Why Im No Longer Talking To White People About Race The Sunday Times Bestseller Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race
Author: Reni Eddo-Lodge
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1408870576
Pages: 272
Year: 2017-06-01
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THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER FOYLES NON-FICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR BLACKWELL'S NON-FICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR LONGLISTED FOR THE BAILLIE GIFFORD PRIZE FOR NON-FICTION SHORTLISTED FOR A BOOKS ARE MY BAG READERS AWARD SHORTLISTED FOR THE JHALAK PRIZE 'Essential' Marlon James, Man Booker Prize-Winner 2015 'One of the most important books of 2017' Nikesh Shukla, editor of The Good Immigrant 'A wake-up call to a country in denial' Observer In 2014, award-winning journalist Reni Eddo-Lodge wrote about her frustration with the way that discussions of race and racism in Britain were being led by those who weren't affected by it. She posted a piece on her blog, entitled: 'Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race'. Her words hit a nerve. The post went viral and comments flooded in from others desperate to speak up about their own experiences. Galvanised by this clear hunger for open discussion, she decided to dig into the source of these feelings. Exploring issues from eradicated black history to the political purpose of white dominance, whitewashed feminism to the inextricable link between class and race, Reni Eddo-Lodge offers a timely and essential new framework for how to see, acknowledge and counter racism. It is a searing, illuminating, absolutely necessary exploration of what it is to be a person of colour in Britain today.
Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race
Author: Reni Eddo-Lodge
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1635572959
Pages: 272
Year: 2019-03-05
View: 1048
Read: 465
Selected by Emma Watson as the Our Shared Shelf Book Club Pick for January/February 2018 Sunday Times Bestseller Winner of the British Book Awards Non-Fiction Narrative Book of the Year Winner of the Jhalak Prize This is a book that was begging to be written . . . Essential." - Marlon James "The most important book for me this year." - Emma Watson "One of the most important books of 2017." - Nikesh Shukla, editor of The Good Immigrant In 2014, award-winning journalist Reni Eddo-Lodge wrote about her frustration with the way that discussions of race and racism in Britain were being led by those who weren''t affected by it. She posted a piece on her blog, entitled: "Why I''m No Longer Talking to White People About Race."Her words hit a nerve. The post went viral and comments flooded in from others desperate to speak up about their own experiences. Galvanized by this clear hunger for open discussion, she decided to dig into the source of these feelings. Exploring issues from eradicated black history to the political purpose of white dominance, whitewashed feminism to the inextricable link between class and race, Reni Eddo-Lodge offers a timely and essential new framework for how to see, acknowledge and counter racism. It is a searing, illuminating, absolutely necessary exploration of what it is to be a person of color in Britain today. Foyles Nonfiction Book of the Year Blackwell''s Nonfiction Book of the Year Named One of the Best Books of 2017 by: NPR The Guardian The Observer The Brooklyn Rail Cultured Vultures "This is a book that was begging to be written. This is the kind of book that demands a future where we''ll no longer need such a book. Essential." - Marlon James, author of Man Booker Prize-winning A BRIEF HISTORY OF SEVEN KILLINGS"This political, accessible and uncompromising book has got people talking about race and racism in Britain." - Guardian, "Books of the Year" "Searing ? A fresh perspective, offering an Anglocentric alternative to the recent status-quo-challenging successes of Get Out and Dear White People . This book''s probing analysis and sharp wit certainly make us pray she will continue talking to white people about race." - Harper''s Bazaar "A clear and convincing dissection of racism and the white denial that perpetuates it." - Our Best Adult Books of 2017 - Nonfiction, starred review, Shelf Awareness "A plainspoken, hard-hitting take on mainstream British society''s avoidance of race and the complexities and manifestations of racism . . . Eddo-Lodge''s crisp prose and impassioned voice implore white Britain to look beyond obvious racism to acknowledge the more opaque existence of structural racism . . . With this thoughtful and direct book, Eddo-Lodge stokes the very conversation that the title rejects." - Publishers Weekly "In her probing and personal narrative, Eddo-Lodge offers fresh insight into the way all racism is ultimately a ''white problem'' that must be addressed by commitment to action, no matter how small . . . A sharp, compelling, and impassioned book." - Kirkus Reviews "The provocative title is hard to ignore, and so is the book''s cover. Seen from afar, it appears to be called Why I''m No Longer Talking About Race, which is intriguing enough on its own. You have to look closer to see To White People hiding underneath it in debossed letters. It''s a striking visual representation of white people''s blindness to everyday, structural racism . . . It''s that boldness, that straight talk which makes this book memorable. Eddo-Lodge pushes readers to recognize that racism is a systemic problem that needs to be tackled by those who run the system." - NPR.org "You don''t have to live in the U.K. to recognize the issues of white privilege, class, feminism and structural racism that [Eddo-Lodge] explores in this essential book." - Silvia Vinas, NPR "Why I''m No Longer Talking to White People about Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge is a timely and sparky discussion about a vital subject." - Times Literary Supplement, "Books of the Year" "Her work, which began as a silent scream against white complicity to racism, has shifted the conversation in the U.K. . . . Though she may not be talking to white people about race, she has gotten a lot of people to listen." - Time Magazine "Reni Eddo-Lodge is that rarest of delights - a young, working-class black woman from Tottenham with a voice in public life ? This book is a real eye-opener when it comes to Britain''s hidden history of discrimination ? A book like this matters now." - Refinery29 "Eddo-Lodge explores the nuanced ways in which racial prejudice continues and is ignored." - Vogue "A must-read that expertly reflects the challenges of addressing structural racism." - starred review, Library Journal "A book that''s set to blow apart the understanding of race relations in this country." - Stylist "I found Why I''m No Longer Talking to White People about Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge timely and resonant. The author''s passages on intersectionality are particularly poignant. It''s a powerful and important read, relevant and accessible whatever your race." - Observer, "Books of the Year" "Thought-provoking (and deeply uncomfortable) ? What Eddo-Lodge does is to force her readers to confront their own complicity ? Her books is a call to action ? What makes the book radical is the way it shifts the burden of ending racism on to white people." - Sunday Herald "Offering extraordinary and articulate insights into contemporary race relations, "Why I''m No Longer Talking to White People About Race" is impressively informative, exceptionally well written, organized and presented, and an essential, core addition to both community and academic library Contemporary Social Issues in general, and Race Relations supplemental studies lists in particular." - Midwest Book Review "Why I''m No Longer Talking To White People About Race . . . look[s] at racial dynamics in the UK, and does so with intelligence and poignance. Eddo-Lodge''s journalism background makes the book the perfect mixture of fact and opinion, resulting in a book that will probably teach you a lot about Britain''s racist history." - Cultured Vultures, "10 Best Books of 2017" "Eddo-Lodge is digesting history for those white readers who have had their ears and eyes shut to the violence in Britain''s past ? An important shift that undermines the idea that racism is the BAME community''s burden to carry. The liberation that this book offers is in the reversal of responsibilities." - Arifa Akbar, Financial Times "It''s deep, it''s important and I suggest taking a deep breath, delving in and I promise you will come up for air woke and better equipped to understand the underlying issues of race in our society." - Sharmaine Lovegrove, ELLE "Daring, interrogatory, illuminating. A forensic dissection of race in the UK from one of the country''s most critical young thinkers. Reni''s penetrative voice is like a punch to the jugular. Read it, then tell everyone you know." - Irenosen Okojie, author of BUTTERFLY FISH"One of the most important books of 2017." - Nikesh Shukla, editor of THE GOOD IMMIGRANT"I''ve never been so excited about a book. Thank God somebody finally wrote it ? Blistering ? Absolutely vital writing from one of the most exciting voices in British politics. A stunningly important debut ? Fellow white people: It''s our responsibility as to read this book ? This book is essential reading for anyone even remotely interested in living in a fairer, kinder and more equal world." - Paris Lees"Laying bare the mechanisms by which we internalise the assumptions, false narratives and skewed perceptions that perpetuate racism, Eddo-Lodge enables readers of every ethnicity to look at life with clearer eyes. A powerful, compelling and urgent read." - Ann Morgan, author of A YEAR OF READING THE WORLD"
Natives
Author: Akala
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 1473661242
Pages: 352
Year: 2018-05-17
View: 974
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'My book of the year. It's personal, historical, political, and it speaks to where we are now. This is the book I've been waiting for - for years' Benjamin Zephaniah 'A potent combination of autobiography and political history which holds up a mirror to contemporary Britain' Independent 'A history lesson of the kind you should get in school, but don't' Stylist 'Powerful ... The kind of disruptive, aggressive intellect that a new generation is closely watching' Afua Hirsch, Guardian 'Part biography, part polemic, this powerful, wide-ranging study picks apart the British myth of meritocracy' David Olusoga, Guardian 'Inspiring' Madani Younis, Observer A searing modern polemic and Sunday Times bestseller from the BAFTA- and MOBO-award-winning musician and political commentator, Akala. From the first time he was stopped and searched as a child, to the day he realised his mum was white, to his first encounters with racist teachers - race and class have shaped Akala's life and outlook. In this unique book he takes his own experiences and widens them out to look at the social, historical and political factors that have left us where we are today. Covering everything from the police, education and identity to politics, sexual objectification and the far right, Natives will speak directly to British denial and squeamishness when it comes to confronting issues of race and class that are at the heart of the legacy of Britain's racialised empire.
Brit(ish)
Author: Afua Hirsch
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1473546893
Pages: 384
Year: 2018-02-01
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The Sunday Times bestseller that reveals the uncomfortable truth about race and identity in Britain today You’re British. Your parents are British. Your partner, your children and most of your friends are British. So why do people keep asking where you’re from? We are a nation in denial about our imperial past and the racism that plagues our present. Brit(ish) is Afua Hirsch’s personal and provocative exploration of how this came to be – and an urgent call for change. ‘The book for our divided and dangerous times’ David Olusoga
The Good Immigrant
Author: Nikesh Shukla, Chimene Suleyman
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 0316524298
Pages: 320
Year: 2019-02-19
View: 693
Read: 844
An urgent collection of essays by first and second-generation immigrants, exploring what it's like to be othered in an increasingly divided America. From Trump's proposed border wall and travel ban to the marching of White Supremacists in Charlottesville, America is consumed by tensions over immigration and the question of which bodies are welcome. In this much-anticipated follow-up to the bestselling UK edition, hailed by Zadie Smith as "lively and vital," editors Nikesh Shukla and Chimene Suleyman hand the microphone to an incredible range of writers whose humanity and right to be here is under attack. Chigozie Obioma unpacks an Igbo proverb that helped him navigate his journey to America from Nigeria. Jenny Zhang analyzes cultural appropriation in 90s fashion, recalling her own pain and confusion as a teenager trying to fit in. Fatimah Asghar describes the flood of memory and emotion triggered by an encounter with an Uber driver from Kashmir. Alexander Chee writes of a visit to Korea that changed his relationship to his heritage. These writers, and the many others in this singular collection, share powerful personal stories of living between cultures and languages while struggling to figure out who they are and where they belong. By turns heartbreaking and hilarious, troubling and uplifting, the essays in The Good Immigrant come together to create a provocative, conversation-sparking, multivocal portrait of America now.
Theatre and Race
Author: Harvey Young
Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education
ISBN: 0230390978
Pages: 96
Year: 2013-05-24
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The theatre has always been a place where conceptions of race and racism have been staged, shared and perpetuated. Harvey Young introduces key ideas about race, before tracing its relationship with theatre and performance - from Ancient Athens to the present day.
So You Want to Talk About Race
Author: Ijeoma Oluo
Publisher: Seal Press
ISBN: 1580056784
Pages: 256
Year: 2018-01-16
View: 1248
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In this breakout book, Ijeoma Oluo explores the complex reality of today's racial landscape--from white privilege and police brutality to systemic discrimination and the Black Lives Matter movement--offering straightforward clarity that readers need to contribute to the dismantling of the racial divide In So You Want to Talk About Race, Editor at Large of The Establishment Ijeoma Oluo offers a contemporary, accessible take on the racial landscape in America, addressing head-on such issues as privilege, police brutality, intersectionality, micro-aggressions, the Black Lives Matter movement, and the "N" word. Perfectly positioned to bridge the gap between people of color and white Americans struggling with race complexities, Oluo answers the questions readers don't dare ask, and explains the concepts that continue to elude everyday Americans. Oluo is an exceptional writer with a rare ability to be straightforward, funny, and effective in her coverage of sensitive, hyper-charged issues in America. Her messages are passionate but finely tuned, and crystalize ideas that would otherwise be vague by empowering them with aha-moment clarity. Her writing brings to mind voices like Ta-Nehisi Coates and Roxane Gay, and Jessica Valenti in Full Frontal Feminism, and a young Gloria Naylor, particularly in Naylor's seminal essay "The Meaning of a Word."
Posh Boys
Author: Robert Verkaik
Publisher: Oneworld Publications
ISBN: 1786073846
Pages: 304
Year: 2018-07-05
View: 155
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Imagine a world where leaders are able to pass power directly to their children. These children are plucked from their nurseries and sent to beautiful compounds far away from all the other children. They are provided with all the teachers they need, the best facilities, doctors and food. Every day they are told this is because they are the brightest and most important children in the world. Years later they are presented with the best jobs, the grandest houses and most of the money. Through their networks of friends and family they control the government, the army, the police and the country’s finances. They claim everyone is equal, that each person has a chance to become a leader. But this isn’t true. If such a world existed today wouldn’t we say it was unfair, even corrupt? With Posh Boys Robert Verkaik issues a searing indictment of the public school system and outlines how, through meaningful reform, we can make society fairer for all.
How to Be Black
Author: Baratunde Thurston
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062098047
Pages: 272
Year: 2012-01-31
View: 208
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New York Times Bestseller Baratunde Thurston’s comedic memoir chronicles his coming-of-blackness and offers practical advice on everything from “How to Be the Black Friend” to “How to Be the (Next) Black President”. Have you ever been called “too black” or “not black enough”? Have you ever befriended or worked with a black person? Have you ever heard of black people? If you answered yes to any of these questions, this book is for you. It is also for anyone who can read, possesses intelligence, loves to laugh, and has ever felt a distance between who they know themselves to be and what the world expects. Raised by a pro-black, Pan-Afrikan single mother during the crack years of 1980s Washington, DC, and educated at Sidwell Friends School and Harvard University, Baratunde Thurston has more than over thirty years' experience being black. Now, through stories of his politically inspired Nigerian name, the heroics of his hippie mother, the murder of his drug-abusing father, and other revelatory black details, he shares with readers of all colors his wisdom and expertise in how to be black. “As a black woman, this book helped me realize I’m actually a white man.”—Patton Oswalt
Little Black Book: The Sunday Times bestseller
Author: Otegha Uwagba
Publisher: HarperCollins UK
ISBN: 000824510X
Pages: 128
Year: 2017-06-15
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‘Little Black Book is THE book of the year for working women with drive’ Refinery 29 The essential career handbook for creative working women. ‘A compact gem’ Stylist
White Rage
Author: Carol Anderson
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 1632864142
Pages: 256
Year: 2016-05-31
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National Book Critics Circle Award Winner New York Times Bestseller A New York Times Notable Book of the Year A Washington Post Notable Nonfiction Book of the Year A Boston Globe Best Book of 2016 A Chicago Review of Books Best Nonfiction Book of 2016 From the Civil War to our combustible present, acclaimed historian Carol Anderson reframes our continuing conversation about race, chronicling the powerful forces opposed to black progress in America. As Ferguson, Missouri, erupted in August 2014, and media commentators across the ideological spectrum referred to the angry response of African Americans as "black rage,†? historian Carol Anderson wrote a remarkable op-ed in The Washington Post suggesting that this was, instead, "white rage at work. With so much attention on the flames," she argued, "everyone had ignored the kindling." Since 1865 and the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, every time African Americans have made advances towards full participation in our democracy, white reaction has fueled a deliberate and relentless rollback of their gains. The end of the Civil War and Reconstruction was greeted with the Black Codes and Jim Crow; the Supreme Court's landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision was met with the shutting down of public schools throughout the South while taxpayer dollars financed segregated white private schools; the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965 triggered a coded but powerful response, the so-called Southern Strategy and the War on Drugs that disenfranchised millions of African Americans while propelling presidents Nixon and Reagan into the White House, and then the election of America's first black President, led to the expression of white rage that has been as relentless as it has been brutal. Carefully linking these and other historical flashpoints when social progress for African Americans was countered by deliberate and cleverly crafted opposition, Anderson pulls back the veil that has long covered actions made in the name of protecting democracy, fiscal responsibility, or protection against fraud, rendering visible the long lineage of white rage. Compelling and dramatic in the unimpeachable history it relates, White Rage will add an important new dimension to the national conversation about race in America.
Everything But the Burden
Author: Greg Tate
Publisher: Broadway Books
ISBN: 0767911261
Pages: 272
Year: 2003-01-14
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White kids from the ’burbs are throwing up gang signs. The 2001 Grammy winner for best rap artist was as white as rice. And blond-haired sorority sisters are sporting FUBU gear. What is going on in American culture that’s giving our nation a racial-identity crisis? Following the trail blazed by Norman Mailer’s controversial essay “The White Negro,” Everything but the Burden brings together voices from music, popular culture, the literary world, and the media speaking about how from Brooklyn to the Badlands white people are co-opting black styles of music, dance, dress, and slang. In this collection, the essayists examine how whites seem to be taking on, as editor Greg Tate’s mother used to tell him, “everything but the burden”–from fetishizing black athletes to spinning the ghetto lifestyle into a glamorous commodity. Is this a way of shaking off the fear of the unknown? A flattering indicator of appreciation? Or is it a more complicated cultural exchange? The pieces in Everything but the Burden explore the line between hero-worship and paternalism. Among the book’s twelve essays are Vernon Reid’s “Steely Dan Understood as the Apotheosis of ‘The White Negro,’” Carl Hancock Rux’s “The Beats: America’s First ‘Wiggas,’” and Greg Tate’s own introductory essay “Nigs ’R Us.” Other contributors include: Hilton Als, Beth Coleman, Tony Green, Robin Kelley, Arthur Jafa, Gary Dauphin, Michaela Angela Davis, dream hampton, and Manthia diAwara. From the Hardcover edition.
Stamped from the Beginning
Author: Ibram X. Kendi
Publisher: Nation Books
ISBN: 1568584644
Pages: 592
Year: 2016-04-12
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A searing history of how racist ideas were created, disseminated, and entrenched in America Winner of the 2016 National Book Award for Nonfiction A New York Times Bestseller A Washington Post Bestseller Finalist for the 2016 National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction Named one of the Best Books of the Year by the Boston Globe, Washington Post, Chicago Review of Books, The Root, Buzzfeed, Bustle, and Entropy "The most ambitious book of 2016."-The Washington Post Some Americans cling desperately to the myth that we are living in a post-racial society, that the election of the first black president spelled the doom of racism. But racist thought is not just alive and well in America--it is more sophisticated and more insidious than ever. And as award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues in Stamped from the Beginning, if we have any hope of grappling with this stark reality, we must first understand how racist ideas were developed, disseminated, and enshrined in American society. In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti-black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. Stamped from the Beginning uses the life stories of five major American intellectuals to offer a window into the contentious debates between assimilationists and segregationists and between racists and antiracists. From Puritan minister Cotton Mather to Thomas Jefferson, from fiery abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison to brilliant scholar W.E.B. Du Bois to legendary anti-prison activist Angela Davis, Kendi shows how and why some of our leading pro-slavery and pro-civil rights thinkers have challenged or helped cement racist ideas in America. Contrary to popular conceptions, racist ideas did not arise from ignorance or hatred. Instead, they were devised and honed by some of the most brilliant minds of each era. These intellectuals used their brilliance to justify and rationalize deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and the nation's racial disparities in everything from wealth to health. And while racist ideas are easily produced and easily consumed, they can also be discredited. In shedding much-needed light on the murky history of racist ideas, Stamped from the Beginning offers us the tools we need to expose them--and in the process, gives us reason to hope.
Inequality in the Promised Land
Author: R. L’Heureux Lewis-McCoy
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804792453
Pages: 232
Year: 2014-06-25
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Nestled in neighborhoods of varying degrees of affluence, suburban public schools are typically better resourced than their inner-city peers and known for their extracurricular offerings and college preparatory programs. Despite the glowing opportunities that many families associate with suburban schooling, accessing a district's resources is not always straightforward, particularly for black and poorer families. Moving beyond class- and race-based explanations, Inequality in the Promised Land focuses on the everyday interactions between parents, students, teachers, and school administrators in order to understand why resources seldom trickle down to a district's racial and economic minorities. Rolling Acres Public Schools (RAPS) is one of the many well-appointed suburban school districts across the United States that has become increasingly racially and economically diverse over the last forty years. Expanding on Charles Tilly's model of relational analysis and drawing on 100 in-depth interviews as well participant observation and archival research, R. L'Heureux Lewis-McCoy examines the pathways of resources in RAPS. He discovers that—due to structural factors, social and class positions, and past experiences—resources are not valued equally among families and, even when deemed valuable, financial factors and issues of opportunity hoarding often prevent certain RAPS families from accessing that resource. In addition to its fresh and incisive insights into educational inequality, this groundbreaking book also presents valuable policy-orientated solutions for administrators, teachers, activists, and politicians.
London Is the Place for Me
Author: Kennetta Hammond Perry
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190240202
Pages: 336
Year: 2016-01-04
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Black people in the British Empire have long challenged the notion that "there ain't no black in the Union Jack." For the post-World War II wave of Afro-Caribbean migrants, many of whom had long been subjects of the Empire, claims to a British identity and imperial citizenship were considered to be theirs by birthright. However, while Britain was internationally touted as a paragon of fair play and equal justice, they arrived in a nation that was frequently hostile and unwilling to incorporate Black people into its concept of what it meant to be British. Black Britons therefore confronted the racial politics of British citizenship and became active political agents in challenging anti-Black racism. In a society with a highly racially circumscribed sense of identity-and the laws, customs, and institutions to back it up-Black Britons had to organize and fight to assert their right to belong. In London Is The Place for Me, Kennetta Hammond Perry explores how Afro-Caribbean migrants navigated the politics of race and citizenship in Britain and reconfigured the boundaries of what it meant to be both Black and British at a critical juncture in the history of Empire and twentieth century transnational race politics. She situates their experience within a broader context of Black imperial and diasporic political participation, and examines the pushback-both legal and physical-that the migrants' presence provoked. Bringing together a variety of sources including calypso music, photographs, migrant narratives, and records of grassroots Black political organizations, London Is the Place for Me positions Black Britons as part of wider public debates both at home and abroad about citizenship, the meaning of Britishness and the politics of race in the second half of the twentieth century. The United Kingdom's postwar discriminatory curbs on immigration and explosion of racial violence forced White Britons as well as Black to question their perception of Britain as a racially progressive society and, therefore, to question the very foundation of their own identities. Perry's examination expands our understanding of race and the Black experience in Europe and uncovers the critical role that Black people played in the formation of contemporary British society.