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Understanding Wall Street
Author: Jeffrey Little
Publisher: McGraw Hill Professional
ISBN: 0071442286
Pages: 304
Year: 2003-12-22
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One of history's top-selling investment guides--800,000 copies sold!--is now updated for a new generation of investors Praise for previous editions of Understanding Wall Street: "One of those rare publications that delivers exactly what it promises . . .consistently good." --Barron's "Among the best for the novice investor." --Los Angeles Times "A good practical education on the stock market." --Business Opportunities Digest Over the past quarter century, Understanding Wall Street has helped investors at every level understand exactly how the stock market works, and how they can build strong portfolios while limiting their exposure to risk. Now completely updated to help investors prosper in the new, no-limits market environment, the "little green book" includes: Two all-new chapters, updated charts and graphs, and nearly 40 percent updated, revised, or new material Strategies for uncovering valuable investment information on the Internet Analysis and explanation of the recent market crash, and how to avoid similar disasters
Understanding Wall Street, Fifth Edition
Author: Jeffrey Little
Publisher: McGraw Hill Professional
ISBN: 0071633219
Pages: 320
Year: 2009-10-04
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A fully revised edition of the INVESTING CLASSIC For over 30 years this comprehensive, easy-to-read guide has served well as the definitive reference for successful investing. Now in its fifth edition and completely updated, Understanding Wall Street helps investors prosper in today’s challenging economy—whether you’re just beginning or among the millions soon to retire. Understanding Wall Street, Fifth Edition, has new sections and information on the issues most important to today’s investors, including: How to use the Internet as an investing tool The shift to exchange traded funds (ETFs) The link between Wall Street and Main Street The Risks and rewards of the global economy Praise for previous editions of Understanding Wall Street: “Recommended. An excellent introduction to stock market intricacies.” —Booklist “A lucid guide to those downtown mysteries.” —Newsday “Remarkable . . . it remains as useful as ever . . . Experience may be the best teacher, but this manual runs a close second.” American Library Book Review
The Wall Street Journal Guide to Understanding Money & Investing
Author: Kenneth M. Morris, Virginia B. Morris
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0743266331
Pages: 159
Year: 2004
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Traces the history of money and discusses stocks, bonds, mutual funds, futures, and options.
Modern Security Analysis
Author: Martin J. Whitman, Fernando Diz
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118603389
Pages: 496
Year: 2013-05-07
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A legendary value investor on security analysis for a modern era This book outlines Whitman's approach to business and security analysis that departs from most conventional security analysts. This approach has more in common with corporate finance than it does with the conventional approach. The key factors in appraising a company and its securities: 1) Credit worthiness, 2) Flows—both cash and earnings, 3) Long-term outlook, 4) Salable assets which can be disposed of without compromising the going concern, dynamics, 5) Resource conversions such as changes in control, mergers and acquisitions, going private, and major changes in assets or in liabilities, and 6) Access to capital. Offers the security analysis value approach Martin Whitman has used successfully since 1986 Details Whitman's unconventional approach to security analysis and offers information on the six key factors for appraising a company Contains the three most overemphasized factors used in conventional securities investing Written by Martin J. Whitman and Fernando Diz, Modern Security Analysis meets the challenge of today's marketplace by taking into account changes to regulation, market structures, instruments, and the speed and volume of trading.
The Wall Street Journal Guide to Understanding Personal Finance
Author: Kenneth M. Morris, Virginia B. Morris
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0743266323
Pages: 176
Year: 2004
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Covers banking services, credit, home finance, financial planning, investments, and taxes.
The Wall Street Journal Guide to Understanding Money and Markets
Author: Richard Saul Wurman
Publisher: Prentice Hall
ISBN: 0139526153
Pages: 119
Year: 1992-01-01
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Stock market behavior
Author: Harvey A. Krow
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 241
Year: 1969-07-01
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Liquidated
Author: Karen Ho
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822391376
Pages: 389
Year: 2009-06-22
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Financial collapses—whether of the junk bond market, the Internet bubble, or the highly leveraged housing market—are often explained as the inevitable result of market cycles: What goes up must come down. In Liquidated, Karen Ho punctures the aura of the abstract, all-powerful market to show how financial markets, and particularly booms and busts, are constructed. Through an in-depth investigation into the everyday experiences and ideologies of Wall Street investment bankers, Ho describes how a financially dominant but highly unstable market system is understood, justified, and produced through the restructuring of corporations and the larger economy. Ho, who worked at an investment bank herself, argues that bankers’ approaches to financial markets and corporate America are inseparable from the structures and strategies of their workplaces. Her ethnographic analysis of those workplaces is filled with the voices of stressed first-year associates, overworked and alienated analysts, undergraduates eager to be hired, and seasoned managing directors. Recruited from elite universities as “the best and the brightest,” investment bankers are socialized into a world of high risk and high reward. They are paid handsomely, with the understanding that they may be let go at any time. Their workplace culture and networks of privilege create the perception that job insecurity builds character, and employee liquidity results in smart, efficient business. Based on this culture of liquidity and compensation practices tied to profligate deal-making, Wall Street investment bankers reshape corporate America in their own image. Their mission is the creation of shareholder value, but Ho demonstrates that their practices and assumptions often produce crises instead. By connecting the values and actions of investment bankers to the construction of markets and the restructuring of U.S. corporations, Liquidated reveals the particular culture of Wall Street often obscured by triumphalist readings of capitalist globalization.
The Wall Street Journal Complete Money and Investing Guidebook
Author: Dave Kansas
Publisher: Crown Business
ISBN: 0307498867
Pages: 224
Year: 2010-12-08
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Unravel the Mysteries of the Financial Markets—the Language, the Players, and the Strategies for Success Understanding money and investing has never been more important than it is today, as many of us are called upon to manage our own retirement planning, college savings funds, and health-care costs. Up-to-date and expertly written, The Wall Street Journal Complete Money and Investing Guidebook provides investors with a simple—but not simplistic—grounding in the world of finance. It breaks down the basics of how money and investing work, explaining: • What must-have information you need to invest in stocks, bonds, and mutual funds • How to see through the inscrutable theories and arcane jargon of financial insiders and advisers • What market players, investing strategies, and money and investing history you should know • Why individual investors should pay attention to the economy Written in a clear, engaging style by Dave Kansas, one of America’s top business journalists and editor of The Wall Street Journal Money & Investing section, this straightforward book is full of helpful charts, graphs, and illustrations and is an essential source for novice and experienced investors alike. Get your financial life in order with help from The Wall Street Journal. Look for: • The Wall Street Journal Complete Personal Finance Guidebook • The Wall Street Journal Personal Finance Workbook • The Wall Street Journal Complete Real Estate Investing Guidebook From the Trade Paperback edition.
The Wall Street Journal Guide to Understanding Your Taxes
Author: Scott R. Schmedel, Kenneth M. Morris, Alan M. Siegel
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0671502352
Pages: 125
Year: 1994
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Provides information on types of taxes, recent changes in IRS tax code, tax planning, and more
Understanding Occupy from Wall Street to Portland
Author: Renee Guarriello Heath, Courtney Vail Fletcher, Ricardo Munoz
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739183222
Pages: 268
Year: 2013-08-29
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The book provides a comprehensive analysis of the Occupy movement using various communication theory perspectives. It considers global and local contexts of the movement from its cultural and economic roots to the views of participants, city officials, newspapers and social media. It grapples with how these perspectives represent romantic, practical, and critical understandings of the movement.
The Wall Street Journal. Complete Personal Finance Guidebook
Author: Jeff D. Opdyke
Publisher: Crown Business
ISBN: 0307498875
Pages: 256
Year: 2010-05-05
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From America’s most authoritative source: the quintessential primer on understanding and managing your money Money courses through just about every corner of our lives and has an impact on the way we live today and how we’ll be able to live in the future. Understanding your money, and getting it to work for you, has never been more important than it is today, as more and more of us are called upon to manage every aspect of our financial lives, from managing day-to-day living expenses to planning a college savings fund and, ultimately, retirement. From The Wall Street Journal, the most trusted name in financial and money matters, this indispensable book takes the mystery out of personal finance. Start with the basics, learn how they work, and you’ll become a better steward of your own money, today and in the future. Consider The Wall Street Journal Complete Personal Finance Guidebook your cheat sheet to the finances of your life. This book will help you: • Understand the nuts and bolts of managing your money: banking, investing, borrowing, insurance, credit cards, taxes, and more • Establish realistic budgets and savings plans • Develop an investment strategy that makes sense for you • Make the right financial decisions about real estate • Plan for retirement intelligently Also available—the companion to this guidebook: The Wall Street Journal Personal Finance Workbook, by Jeff D. Opdyke Get your financial life in order with help from The Wall Street Journal. Look for: • The Wall Street Journal Complete Money and Investing Guidebook • The Wall Street Journal Complete Identity Theft Guidebook • The Wall Street Journal Complete Real Estate Investing Guidebook From the Trade Paperback edition.
Wall Street Lingo
Author: Nora Peterson
Publisher: Atlantic Publishing Company
ISBN:
Pages: 288
Year: 2007
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The exchanges : at home and abroad -- Exchange operations : bringing order to the markets -- Playing fair : rules and regulations -- The big wheels : Wall Street professionals -- The money machines : bankers, economists and world trade -- The money makers : corporations at home and abroad -- Investors, big and small -- The industry guard dogs : regulators, enforcers and safety nets -- Economics for investors : the ups and downs of business the business cycle -- Economic indicators : taking the business cycle temperature -- The long and short of trends, cycles and crashes : market movement and the indexes that track them -- Stocks : owning a piece of something big -- Funds : letting a professional make the decisions -- Bonds : loaning corporations and governments money -- Options and futures : taking bigger chances -- Initial public offerings : the darling of the 90s -- Fundamental analysis : cheap or undervalued? -- Decoding financial statements : seeing beyond the numbers -- Equity valuations : it's all relative -- Bond valuations : all debt is not created equal -- Technical analysis : using the past to predict the future -- Charting : more than pretty pictures -- Tools that match your style : starting with the right broker -- Orders, quotes and fills : getting the price you want -- Recordkeeping and taxes : paying the piper -- Investor resources : getting help when you need it -- Acronyms : alphabet soup
Uninvested
Author: Bobby Monks
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0698406281
Pages: 192
Year: 2015-08-04
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Bobby Monks is blowing the whistle on Wall Street, giving middle class Americans the low down on how they’re being fleeced of their retirement money—and what they can do about it Every month our financial statements arrive, and every month we glance at them, trying to understand, hoping that we’ll come out ahead. But most of us have no idea what’s really going on or the costs involved. According to Bobby Monks—who has been a banker and borrower, investor and entrepreneur—financial firms and money managers have complicated the investing process to keep us in the dark, profiting from our ignorance. Having dealt with the financial sector throughout his career, Monks has seen it all. In Uninvested, he reveals how, when, and why the relationship between us and our money managers became corrupted—and what we can do to fix it. Monks shows how the system works not only against us as individuals but also against society at large. Without our knowledge or approval, our money is diverted into the pockets of CEOs and misappropriated, promoting business practices that contribute to economic inequality, political dysfunction, and environmental woe. Monks’ experiences give him a unique perspective on how we got to this point. Drawing on original research and interviews with key figures such as Vanguard founder Jack Bogle, legendary investor Carl Icahn, and former congressman Barney Frank of the Dodd-Frank Act, Monks teaches us how to take back ownership and control of our money. As he writes: Even in the decades preceding the most recent downturn, very few investors enjoyed financial success equal to that of their money managers. Given this, I have long wondered why investors don’t pull their money out of the system en masse. I suspect that it is because most feel powerless. Unaware of the implications of their investments and unable to penetrate the excruciating complexity of the system that facilitates them, many seem to seek refuge in their money managers’ aura of sophistication, pretense of competence, and projection of certainty. It seems to me that most investors are simply sleepwalking through the investing process. They have become uninvested. When we outsource our investing, we sacrifice control—but not responsibility. My goal in writing this book is to convince you that the best (and only) way to fix this broken system is to awaken a critical mass of engaged investors and recruit them to participate more fully in the investing process. From the Hardcover edition.
Why Wall Street Matters
Author: William D. Cohan
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 0399590706
Pages: 192
Year: 2017-02-28
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A timely, counterintuitive defense of Wall Street and the big banks as the invisible—albeit flawed—engines that power our ideas, and should be made to work better for all of us Maybe you think the banks should be broken up and the bankers should be held accountable for the financial crisis in 2008. Maybe you hate the greed of Wall Street but know that it’s important to the proper functioning of the world economy. Maybe you don’t really understand Wall Street, and phrases such as “credit default swap” make your eyes glaze over. Maybe you are utterly confused by the fact that after attacking Wall Street mercilessly during his campaign, Donald Trump has surrounded himself with Wall Street veterans. But if you like your smart phone or your widescreen TV, your car or your morning bacon, your pension or your 401(k), then—whether you know it or not—you are a fan of Wall Street. William D. Cohan is no knee-jerk advocate for Wall Street and the big banks. He’s one of America’s most respected financial journalists and the progressive bestselling author of House of Cards. He has long been critical of the bad behavior that plagued much of Wall Street in the years leading up to the 2008 financial crisis, and because he spent seventeen years as an investment banker on Wall Street, he is an expert on its inner workings as well. But in recent years he’s become alarmed by the cheap shots and ceaseless vitriol directed at Wall Street’s bankers, traders, and executives—the people whose job it is to provide capital to those who need it, the grease that keeps our economy humming. In this brisk, no-nonsense narrative, Cohan reminds us of the good these institutions do—and the dire consequences for us all if the essential role they play in making our lives better is carelessly curtailed. Praise for William D. Cohan “Cohan writes with an insider’s knowledge of the workings of Wall Street, a reporter’s investigative instincts and a natural storyteller’s narrative command.”—The New York Times “[Cohan is] one of our most able financial journalists.”—Los Angeles Times “A former Wall Street man and a talented writer, [Cohan] has the rare gift not only of understanding the fiendishly complicated goings-on, but also of being able to explain them in terms the lay reader can grasp.”—The Observer (London)