Toward A Natural Forest The Forest Service In Transition A Memoir Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Toward a Natural Forest
Author: Jim Furnish
Publisher:
ISBN: 0870718134
Pages: 213
Year: 2015
View: 772
Read: 1096
The Forest Service stumbled in responding to a wave of lawsuits from environmental groups in the late 20th Century—a phenomenon best symbolized by the spotted owl controversy that shut down logging on public forests in the Pacific Northwest in the 1990s. The agency was brought to its knees, pitted between a powerful timber industry that had been having its way with the national forests for decades, and organized environmentalists who believed public lands had been abused and deserved better stewardship. Toward a Natural Forest offers an insider's view of this tumultuous time in the history of the Forest Service, presenting twin tales of transformation, both within the agency and within the author's evolving environmental consciousness. Drawing on the author's personal experience and his broad professional knowledge, Toward a Natural Forest illuminates the potential of the Forest Service to provide strong leadership in global conservation efforts. Those interested in our public lands—environmentalists, natural resource professionals, academics, and historians—will find Jim Furnish's story deeply informed, thought-provoking, and ultimately inspiring.
The U.S. Forest Service in the Pacific Northwest
Author: Gerald W. Williams
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 416
Year: 2009
View: 239
Read: 1242
The Northwest has been at the forefront of forest management and research in the United States for more than one hundred years. In The U.S. Forest Service in the Pacific Northwest, Gerald Williams provides an historical overview of the part the Forest Service has played in managing the Northwest's forests. Emphasizing changes in management policy over the years, Williams discusses the establishment of the national forests in Oregon and Washington, grazing on public land, the Great Depression, World War II, and the rise of multiple-use management policies. He draws on extensive documentation of the post-war development boom to explore its effects on forests and Forest Service workers. Discussing such controversial issues as roadless areas and wilderness designation; timber harvesting; forest planning; ecosystems; and spotted owls, Williams demonstrates the impact of 1970s environmental laws on national forest management. The book is rich in photographs, many drawn from the Gerald W. Williams Collection, housed in University Archives at Oregon State University Libraries. Extensive appendices provide detailed data about Pacific Northwest forests. Chronicling a century of the agency's management of almost 25 million acres of national forests and grasslands for the people of the United States, The U.S. Forest Service in the Pacific Northwest is a welcome and overdue resource.
Forest Dreams, Forest Nightmares
Author: Nancy Langston
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295989688
Pages: 384
Year: 2009-11-23
View: 771
Read: 671
Across the inland West, forests that once seemed like paradise have turned into an ecological nightmare. Fires, insect epidemics, and disease now threaten millions of acres of once-bountiful forests. Yet no one can agree what went wrong. Was it too much management�or not enough�that forced the forests of the inland West to the verge of collapse? Is the solution more logging, or no logging at all? In this gripping work of scientific and historical detection, Nancy Langston unravels the disturbing history of what went wrong with the western forests, despite the best intentions of those involved. Focusing on the Blue Mountains of northeastern Oregon and southeastern Washington, she explores how the complex landscapes that so impressed settlers in the nineteenth century became an ecological disaster in the late twentieth. Federal foresters, intent on using their scientific training to stop exploitation and waste, suppressed light fires in the ponderosa pinelands. Hoping to save the forests, they could not foresee that their policies would instead destroy what they loved. When light fires were kept out, a series of ecological changes began. Firs grew thickly in forests once dominated by ponderosa pines, and when droughts hit, those firs succumbed to insects, diseases, and eventually catastrophic fires. Nancy Langston combines remarkable skills as both scientist and writer of history to tell this story. Her ability to understand and bring to life the complex biological processes of the forest is matched by her grasp of the human forces at work�from Indians, white settlers, missionaries, fur trappers, cattle ranchers, sheep herders, and railroad builders to timber industry and federal forestry managers. The book will be of interest to a wide audience of environmentalists, historians, ecologists, foresters, ranchers, and loggers�and all people who want to understand the changing lands of the West.
Forestry in the U.S. South
Author: Mason C. Carter, Robert C. Kellison, R. Scott Wallinger
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 0807160563
Pages: 448
Year: 2015-11-09
View: 154
Read: 1274
During the second half of the twentieth century, the forest industry removed more than 300 billion cubic feet of timber from southern forests. Yet at the same time, partnerships between public and private entities improved the inventory, health, and productivity of this vast and resilient resource. A comprehensive and multilayered history, Forestry in the U.S. South explores the remarkable commercial and environmental gains made possible through the collaboration of industry, universities, and other agencies. This authoritative assessment starts by discussing the motives and practices of early lumber companies, which, having exhausted the forests of the Northeast by the turn of the twentieth century, aggressively began to harvest the virgin pine of the South, with production peaking by 1909. The rapidly declining supply of old-growth southern pine triggered a threat of timber famine and inspired efforts to regulate the industry. By mid-century, however, industrial forestry had its own profit incentive to replenish harvested timber. This set the stage for a unique alliance between public and private sectors, which conducted cooperative research on tree improvement, fertilization, seedling production, and other practices germane to sustainable forest management. By the close of the 1990s, concerns about an inadequate timber supply gave way to questions about how to utilize millions of acres of pine plantations approaching maturity. No longer concerned with the future supply of raw material and facing mounting global competition the U.S. pulp and paper industry consolidated, restructured, and sold nearly 20 million acres of forests to Timber Investment Management Organizations (TIMOs) and Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs), resulting in an entirely new dynamic for private forestry in the South. Incomparable in scope, Forestry in the U.S. South spotlights the people and organizations responsible for empowering individual forest owners across the region, tripling the production of pine stands and bolstering the livelihoods of thousands of men and women across the South.
People, Forests, and Change
Author: Deanna H. Olson, Beatrice Van Horne
Publisher: Island Press
ISBN: 1610917677
Pages: 360
Year: 2017-04-20
View: 844
Read: 1211
We owe much of our economic prosperity to the vast forested landscapes that cover the earth. But forests are under more pressure than ever. It is time to forgo the entrenched thinking that forests can be managed outside of human influence, and shift instead to management strategies that consider humans to be part of the forest ecosystem. People, Forests, and Change: Lessons from the Pacific Northwest, considers the nature of forests in flux and how to balance the needs of forests and rural communities. In the US northwest, forest ecosystem management has been underway for two decades, and key lessons are emerging. This book brings together ideas for policy makers, managers, students, and conservationists seeking to manage forests conscientiously and assure their long-term viability.
The U.S. Forest Service
Author: Harold K. Steen
Publisher:
ISBN: 0295983736
Pages: 356
Year: 2004
View: 1071
Read: 606
The U.S. Forest Service celebrates its centennial in 2005. With a new preface by the author, this edition of Harold K. Steen’s classic history (originally published in 1976) provides a broad perspective on the Service’s administrative and policy controversies and successes. Steen updates the book with discussions of a number of recent concerns, among them the spotted owl issue; wilderness and roadless areas; new research on habitat, biodiversity, and fire prevention; below-cost timber sales; and workplace diversity in a male-oriented field.
Our Land Was A Forest
Author: Mark Selden
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0429978162
Pages: 172
Year: 2018-02-07
View: 682
Read: 725
This book is a beautiful and moving personal account of the Ainu, the native inhabitants of Hokkaido, Japan's northern island, whose land, economy, and culture have been absorbed and destroyed in recent centuries by advancing Japanese. Based on the author's own experiences and on stories passed down from generation to generation, the book chronicles the disappearing world?and courageous rebirth?of this little-understood people.Kayano describes with disarming simplicity and frankness the personal conflicts he faced as a result of the tensions between a traditional and a modern society and his lifelong efforts to fortify a living Ainu culture. A master storyteller, he paints a vivid picture of the Ainus' ecologically sensitive lifestyle, which revolved around bear hunting, fishing, farming, and woodcutting.Unlike the few existing ethnographies of the Ainu, this account is the first written by an insider intimately tied to his own culture yet familiar with the ways of outsiders. Speaking with a rare directness to the Ainu and universal human experience, this book will interest all readers concerned with the fate of indigenous peoples.
The Tinder Box
Author: Christopher Burchfield
Publisher:
ISBN: 0692300376
Pages: 530
Year: 2014-09-16
View: 1290
Read: 508
This second edition of "The Tinder Box," published in September 2014 by Seneca Books, provides readers with greater detail concerning events that occurred within the U.S. Forest Service from 1982 through 2008, and has a far more extensive Index. Since 1990 over 113,000,000 acres of America's timber lands have been consumed by wildfire, one of many disasters the U.S. Forest Service must be held accountable for. Over that same period the timber industry, companies engaged in making wood products, owners of properties adjacent forest lands, and the public at large have become incensed by the agency's ineptitude. To learn more read Christopher Burchfield's "The Tinder Box: How Politically Correct Ideology Destroyed the U.S. Forest Service." The book goes back to the very beginning--33 years ago--when the agency set about destroying itself from within. Readers will finally grasp those terrible events inside the agency, all of which took place entirely outside of public purview. Indeed, this is the first inside look at how--step-by-step, political correctness destroyed an American institution.
Intelligent Courage
Author: Michael E. Fraidenburg
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 203
Year: 2007
View: 1206
Read: 368
Intelligent Courage presents practical, wise, workable ideas to succeed in the real-world work environment of natural resource professionals. It is especially relevant for students nearing completion of their university education. Seasoned professionals tell career stories and analyze these as learning experiences. In doing so these distinguished professionals impart a good deal of the 'street smarts' they learned from their careers that can help any natural resource professional create the career they want.
The Year Yellowstone Burned
Author: Jeff Henry
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1589799046
Pages: 296
Year: 2015-05-01
View: 699
Read: 800
The Yellowstone fires of 1988 consumed nearly 800,000 acres—36 percent of the park. In the years following, spectacular wildflowers rose from the ashes and trees rapidly reclaimed the landscape. In this twenty-five-year look back at the fires, author and photographer Jeff Henry recalls not only the summer of 1988, when he witnessed and photographed nearly every aspect of the fires, but also the years since as nature healed the charred landscape. A beautiful book that depicts nature as simultaneously malevolent and beneficent, The Year Yellowstone Burned demonstrates the resilience of one of our continent’s most dynamic ecosystems.
Gifford Pinchot and the Making of Modern Environmentalism
Author: Char Miller
Publisher: Island Press
ISBN: 1610910745
Pages: 384
Year: 2013-06-17
View: 284
Read: 1257
"...an absorbing, well-researched, and illuminating life of an American leader who now receives the full attention he deserves." -MICHAEL BESCHLOSS, EDITOR OF AMERICAN HERITAGE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF THE PRESIDENTS "Char Miller's lively, insightful account of the life and world of American forester Gifford Pinchot fills a vitally important gap in environmental and conservation history. Anyone captivated by the issues and controversies surrounding the preservation and development of the nation's natural heritage should read this engaging, carefully researched biography." -CAROLYN MERCHANT, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY, AUTHOR OF THE DEATH OF NATURE Gifford Pinchot is known primarily for his work as first chief of the U. S. Forest Service and for his argument that resources should be used to provide the "greatest good for the greatest number of people." But Pinchot was a more complicated figure than has generally been recognized, and more than half a century after his death, he continues to provoke controversy. Gifford Pinchot and the Making of Modern Environmentalism, the first new biography in more than three decades, offers a fresh interpretation of the life and work of the famed conservationist and Progressive politician. In addition to considering Gifford Pinchot's role in the environmental movement, historian Char Miller sets forth an engaging description and analysis of the man -- his character, passions, and personality -- and the larger world through which he moved. Char Miller begins by describing Pinchot's early years and the often overlooked influence of his family and their aspirations for him. He examines Gifford Pinchot's post-graduate education in France and his ensuing efforts in promoting the profession of forestry in the United States and in establishing and running the Forest Service. While Pinchot's twelve years as chief forester (1898-1910) are the ones most historians and biographers focus on, Char Miller also offers an extensive examination of Pinchot's post-federal career as head of The National Conservation Association and as two-term governor of Pennsylvania. In addition, he looks at Pinchot's marriage to feminist Cornelia Bryce and discusses her role in Pinchot's political radicalization throughout the 1920s and 1930s. An epilogue explores Gifford Pinchot's final years and writings. Char Miller offers a provocative reconsideration of key events in Pinchot's life, including his relationship with friend and mentor John Muir and their famous disagreement over damming Hetch Hetchy Valley. The author brings together insights from cultural and social history and recently discovered primary sources to support a new interpretation of Pinchot -- whose activism not only helped define environmental politics in early twentieth century America but remains strikingly relevant today.
This Land Is Your Land
Author: Michael J. Lannoo
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022635850X
Pages: 304
Year: 2018-08-03
View: 1271
Read: 340
Field biology is enjoying a resurgence due to several factors, the most important being the realization that there is no ecology, no conservation, and no ecosystem restoration without an understanding of the basic relationships between species and their environments—an understanding gleaned only through field-based natural history. With this resurgence, modern field biologists find themselves asking fundamental existential questions such as: Where did we come from? What is our story? Are we part of a larger legacy? In This Land Is Your Land, seasoned field biologist Michael J. Lannoo answers these questions and more in a tale rooted in the people and institutions of the Midwest. It is a story told from the ground up, a rubber boot–based natural history of field biology in America. Lannoo illuminates characters such as John Wesley Powell, William Temple Hornaday, and Olaus and Adolph Murie—homegrown midwestern field biologists who either headed east to populate major research centers or went west to conduct their fieldwork along the frontier. From the pioneering work of Victor Shelford, Henry Chandler Cowles, and Aldo Leopold to contemporary insights from biologists such as Jim Furnish and historians such as William Cronon, Lannoo’s unearthing of American—and particularly midwestern—field biologists reveals how these scientists influenced American ecology, conservation biology, and restoration ecology, and in turn drove global conservation efforts through environmental legislation and land set-asides. This Land Is Your Land reveals the little-known legacy of midwestern field biologists, whose ethos and discoveries have enabled us to preserve and understand not just their land, but all lands.
A Geography of Saints
Author: Penny Allen
Publisher: Zoland Books, Incorporated
ISBN: 1581950284
Pages: 263
Year: 2001
View: 424
Read: 809
The filmmaker recounts her first year caretaking an Oregon horse ranch after leaving her job in Portland to live with her new lover, and shares the experiences of modern-day range wars, loggers, water problems, and a love affair.
River Of Time
Author: Jon Swain
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1407072803
Pages: 304
Year: 2010-05-25
View: 586
Read: 663
Between 1970 and 1975 Jon Swain, the English journalist portrayed in David Puttnam's film, The Killing Fields, lived in the lands of the Mekong river. This is his account of those years, and the way in which the tumultuous events affected his perceptions of life and death as Europe never could. He also describes the beauty of the Mekong landscape - the villages along its banks, surrounded by mangoes, bananas and coconuts, and the exquisite women, the odours of opium, and the region's other face - that of violence and corruption.
Environmental Ethics
Author: Joseph R. Des Jardins
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1133710867
Pages: 304
Year: 2012-01-13
View: 759
Read: 623
ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS, FIFTH EDITION offers brief yet wide-ranging introduction to issues of environmental ethics and major schools of thought in the field. A discussion of basic concepts in ethical theory in Part I is followed by an application of these thoughts across a variety of major environmental problems (such as pollution, population, animals) in Part II. Part III introduces students to the major theories of environmental ethics in particular (including biocentrism, ecofeminism, and the land ethic). The final chapter offers a pragmatic approach to reconciling philosophical perspectives as a means to making progress in solving environmental problems. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Recently Visited