The Triumph Of Christianity How A Forbidden Religion Swept The World Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

The Triumph of Christianity
Author: Bart D. Ehrman
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1501136720
Pages: 352
Year: 2018-02-13
View: 1310
Read: 470
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER From the bestselling authority on early Christianity, the story of how Christianity grew from a religion of twenty or so peasants in rural Galilee to the dominant religion in the West in less than four hundred years. Christianity didn’t have to become the dominant religion in the West. It easily could have remained a sect of Judaism fated to have the historical importance of the Sadducees or the Essenes. In The Triumph of Christianity, Bart Ehrman, a master explainer of Christian history, texts, and traditions, shows how a religion whose first believers were twenty or so illiterate day laborers in a remote part of the empire became the official religion of Rome, converting some thirty million people in just four centuries. The Triumph of Christianity combines deep knowledge and meticulous research in an eye-opening, immensely readable narrative that upends the way we think about the single most important cultural transformation our world has ever seen—one that revolutionized art, music, literature, philosophy, ethics, economics, and law.
The Triumph of Christianity
Author: Bart D. Ehrman
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1501136704
Pages: 352
Year: 2018-02-13
View: 932
Read: 403
Looks at how Christianity went from being an obscure sect of Judaism followed by a small group of rural peasants to being the dominant religion in the west in less than four hundred years.
The Triumph of Christianity
Author: Bart D. Ehrman
Publisher: Oneworld Publications
ISBN: 1786073021
Pages: 352
Year: 2018-02-22
View: 203
Read: 931
The first Christians were a small group of illiterate peasants from the backwaters of the Roman Empire, who proclaimed that an executed enemy of the state was God’s messiah. Less than 400 years later it would be the official religion of Rome with some 30 million followers. How did this happen? From Jesus’s death in the early first century to the conversion of Emperor Constantine and its aftermath in the fourth century, Bart Ehrman chronicles the epic historical narrative of Christianity’s rise. Through meticulous research and luminous prose, he reveals why people took heed of accounts of Jesus’s miracles amidst a plethora of such tales in the ancient world, and examines what was unique about the Christian message that converts found so compelling. The Triumph of Christianity upends the way we think about one of the most important cultural transformations our world has ever seen – that which has shaped the art, music, literature, philosophy, ethics, economics and law of modern Western civilization.
The Darkening Age
Author: Catherine Nixey
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0544800931
Pages: 384
Year: 2018-04-17
View: 1314
Read: 1182
A bold new history of the rise of Christianity, showing how its radical followers ravaged vast swathes of classical culture, plunging the world into an era of dogma and intellectual darkness “Searingly passionate…Nixey writes up a storm. Each sentence is rich, textured, evocative, felt…[A] ballista-bolt of a book.” —New York Times Book Review In Harran, the locals refused to convert. They were dismembered, their limbs hung along the town’s main street. In Alexandria, zealots pulled the elderly philosopher-mathematician Hypatia from her chariot and flayed her to death with shards of broken pottery. Not long before, their fellow Christians had invaded the city’s greatest temple and razed it—smashing its world-famous statues and destroying all that was left of Alexandria’s Great Library. Today, we refer to Christianity’s conquest of the West as a “triumph.” But this victory entailed an orgy of destruction in which Jesus’s followers attacked and suppressed classical culture, helping to pitch Western civilization into a thousand-year-long decline. Just one percent of Latin literature would survive the purge; countless antiquities, artworks, and ancient traditions were lost forever. As Catherine Nixey reveals, evidence of early Christians’ campaign of terror has been hiding in plain sight: in the palimpsests and shattered statues proudly displayed in churches and museums the world over. In The Darkening Age, Nixey resurrects this lost history, offering a wrenching account of the rise of Christianity and its terrible cost.
A New History of Early Christianity
Author: Charles Freeman
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 030012581X
Pages: 377
Year: 2009
View: 389
Read: 913
The relevance of Christianity is as hotly contested today as it has ever been. A New History of Early Christianity shows how our current debates are rooted in the many controversies surrounding the birth of the religion and the earliest attempts to resolve them. Charles Freeman’s meticulous historical account of Christianity from its birth in Judaea in the first century A.D. to the emergence of Western and Eastern churches by A.D. 600 reveals that it was a distinctive, vibrant, and incredibly diverse movement brought into order at the cost of intellectual and spiritual vitality. Against the conventional narrative of the inevitable “triumph” of a single distinct Christianity, Freeman shows that there was a host of competing Christianities, many of which had as much claim to authenticity as those that eventually dominated. Looking with fresh eyes at the historical record, Freeman explores the ambiguities and contradictions that underlay Christian theology and the unavoidable compromises enforced in the name of doctrine. Tracing the astonishing transformation that the early Christian church underwent—from sporadic niches of Christian communities surviving in the wake of a horrific crucifixion to sanctioned alliance with the state—Charles Freeman shows how freedom of thought was curtailed by the development of the concept of faith. The imposition of "correct belief," religious uniformity, and an institutional framework that enforced orthodoxy were both consolidating and stifling. Uncovering the difficulties in establishing the Christian church, he examines its relationship with Judaism, Gnosticism, Greek philosophy and Greco-Roman society, and he offers dramatic new accounts of Paul, the resurrection, and the church fathers and emperors.
God's Problem
Author: Bart D. Ehrman
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0061744409
Pages: 304
Year: 2009-10-13
View: 515
Read: 446
One Bible, Many Answers In God's Problem, the New York Times bestselling author of Misquoting Jesus challenges the contradictory biblical explanations for why an all-powerful God allows us to suffer.
Jesus, Interrupted
Author: Bart D. Ehrman
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0061173932
Pages: 292
Year: 2009-03-03
View: 695
Read: 719
Examines contradictions and discrepancies that come to light when the New Testament is studied from a historical perspective, including varying views of Jesus and salvation and forgeries in the names of the apostles.
Misquoting Jesus
Author: Bart D. Ehrman
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0061977020
Pages: 272
Year: 2009-10-06
View: 1141
Read: 989
When world-class biblical scholar Bart Ehrman first began to study the texts of the Bible in their original languages he was startled to discover the multitude of mistakes and intentional alterations that had been made by earlier translators. In Misquoting Jesus, Ehrman tells the story behind the mistakes and changes that ancient scribes made to the New Testament and shows the great impact they had upon the Bible we use today. He frames his account with personal reflections on how his study of the Greek manuscripts made him abandon his once ultraconservative views of the Bible. Since the advent of the printing press and the accurate reproduction of texts, most people have assumed that when they read the New Testament they are reading an exact copy of Jesus's words or Saint Paul's writings. And yet, for almost fifteen hundred years these manuscripts were hand copied by scribes who were deeply influenced by the cultural, theological, and political disputes of their day. Both mistakes and intentional changes abound in the surviving manuscripts, making the original words difficult to reconstruct. For the first time, Ehrman reveals where and why these changes were made and how scholars go about reconstructing the original words of the New Testament as closely as possible. Ehrman makes the provocative case that many of our cherished biblical stories and widely held beliefs concerning the divinity of Jesus, the Trinity, and the divine origins of the Bible itself stem from both intentional and accidental alterations by scribes -- alterations that dramatically affected all subsequent versions of the Bible.
Jesus Before the Gospels
Author: Bart D. Ehrman
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 0062285238
Pages: 336
Year: 2016-03-01
View: 622
Read: 588
The bestselling author of Misquoting Jesus, one of the most renowned and controversial Bible scholars in the world today examines oral tradition and its role in shaping the stories about Jesus we encounter in the New Testament—and ultimately in our understanding of Christianity. Throughout much of human history, our most important stories were passed down orally—including the stories about Jesus before they became written down in the Gospels. In this fascinating and deeply researched work, leading Bible scholar Bart D. Ehrman investigates the role oral history has played in the New Testament—how the telling of these stories not only spread Jesus’ message but helped shape it. A master explainer of Christian history, texts, and traditions, Ehrman draws on a range of disciplines, including psychology and anthropology, to examine the role of memory in the creation of the Gospels. Explaining how oral tradition evolves based on the latest scientific research, he demonstrates how the act of telling and retelling impacts the story, the storyteller, and the listener—crucial insights that challenge our typical historical understanding of the silent period between when Jesus lived and died and when his stories began to be written down. As he did in his previous books on religious scholarship, debates on New Testament authorship, and the existence of Jesus of Nazareth, Ehrman combines his deep knowledge and meticulous scholarship in a compelling and eye-opening narrative that will change the way we read and think about these sacred texts.
The Triumph of Christianity
Author: Rodney Stark
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062098705
Pages: 512
Year: 2011-10-25
View: 538
Read: 1169
Celebrated religious and social historian Rodney Starktraces the extraordinary rise of Christianity through its most pivotal andcontroversial moments to offer fresh perspective on the history of the world’slargest religion. In The Triumph of Christianity, the author of God’sBattalions and The Rise of Christianity gathers and refines decadesof powerful research and discovery into one concentrated, concise, and highlyreadable volume that explores Christianity’s most crucial episodes. The uniqueformat of Triumph of Christianity allows Stark to avoid densechronologies and difficult back stories, bringing readers right to the heart ofChristian history’s most vital controversies and enduring lessons.
CHRISTIANITY AT THE CROSSROADS
Author: MICHAEL J. KRUGER
Publisher: InterVarsity Press
ISBN: 0830887512
Pages:
Year: 2018-01-29
View: 488
Read: 630

Peter, Paul, and Mary Magdalene
Author: Bart D Ehrman
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0195343506
Pages: 285
Year: 2008-04-24
View: 632
Read: 258
From the Publisher: Bart Ehrman, author of the bestsellers Misquoting Jesus and Truth and Fiction in The Da Vinci Code, here takes readers on another engaging tour of the early Christian church, illuminating the lives of three of Jesus' most intriguing followers: Simon Peter, Paul of Tarsus, and Mary Magdalene.
The Orthodox Corruption of Scripture
Author: Bart D. Ehrman
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199746281
Pages: 328
Year: 1996-02-29
View: 827
Read: 861
Victors not only write history: they also reproduce the texts. Bart Ehrman explores the close relationship between the social history of early Christianity and the textual tradition of the emerging New Testament, examining how early struggles between Christian "heresy" and "orthodoxy" affected the transmission of the documents over which many of the debates were waged. He makes a crucial contribution to our understanding of the social and intellectual history of early Christianity and raises intriguing questions about the relationship of readers to their texts, especially in an age when scribes could transform the documents they reproduced. This edition includes a new afterword surveying research in biblical interpretation over the past twenty years.
Jesus
Author: Bart D. Ehrman
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199839433
Pages: 288
Year: 1999-09-23
View: 985
Read: 765
In this highly accessible discussion, Bart Ehrman examines the most recent textual and archaeological sources for the life of Jesus, along with the history of first-century Palestine, drawing a fascinating portrait of the man and his teachings. Ehrman shows us what historians have long known about the Gospels and the man who stands behind them. Through a careful evaluation of the New Testament (and other surviving sources, including the more recently discovered Gospels of Thomas and Peter), Ehrman proposes that Jesus can be best understood as an apocalyptic prophet--a man convinced that the world would end dramatically within the lifetime of his apostles and that a new kingdom would be created on earth. According to Ehrman, Jesus' belief in a coming apocalypse and his expectation of an utter reversal in the world's social organization not only underscores the radicalism of his teachings but also sheds light on both the appeal of his message to society's outcasts and the threat he posed to Jerusalem's established leadership.
How Jesus Became God
Author: Bart D. Ehrman
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062252194
Pages: 416
Year: 2014-03-25
View: 656
Read: 485
New York Times bestselling author and Bible expert Bart Ehrman reveals how Jesus’s divinity became dogma in the first few centuries of the early church. The claim at the heart of the Christian faith is that Jesus of Nazareth was, and is, God. But this is not what the original disciples believed during Jesus’s lifetime—and it is not what Jesus claimed about himself. How Jesus Became God tells the story of an idea that shaped Christianity, and of the evolution of a belief that looked very different in the fourth century than it did in the first. A master explainer of Christian history, texts, and traditions, Ehrman reveals how an apocalyptic prophet from the backwaters of rural Galilee crucified for crimes against the state came to be thought of as equal with the one God Almighty, Creator of all things. But how did he move from being a Jewish prophet to being God? In a book that took eight years to research and write, Ehrman sketches Jesus’s transformation from a human prophet to the Son of God exalted to divine status at his resurrection. Only when some of Jesus’s followers had visions of him after his death—alive again—did anyone come to think that he, the prophet from Galilee, had become God. And what they meant by that was not at all what people mean today. Written for secular historians of religion and believers alike, How Jesus Became God will engage anyone interested in the historical developments that led to the affirmation at the heart of Christianity: Jesus was, and is, God.

Recently Visited