The Suffering Of God An Old Testament Perspective Overtures To Biblical Theology Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

The Suffering of God
Author: Terence E. Fretheim
Publisher: Fortress Press
ISBN: 1451418841
Pages: 203
Year: 1984
View: 424
Read: 815
In this comprehensive and thought-provoking study, Terence Fretheim focuses on the theme of divine suffering, an aspect of our understanding of God which both the church and scholarship have neglected. Maintaining that "metaphors matter," Fretheim carefully examines the ruling and anthropomorphic metaphors of the Old Testament and discusses them in the context of current biblical-theological scholarship. His aim is to broaden our understanding of the God of the Old Testament by showing that "suffering belongs to the person and purpose of God".
God and World in the Old Testament
Author: Terence E. Fretheim
Publisher: Abingdon Press
ISBN: 1426719450
Pages: 351
Year: 2010-08-01
View: 444
Read: 331
Fretheim presents here the Old Testament view of the Creator God, the created world, and our role in creation. Beginning with "The Beginning," he demonstrates that creation is open-ended and connected. Then, from every part of the Old Testament, Fretheim explores the fullness and richness of Israel's thought regarding creation: from the dynamic created order to human sin, from judgment and environmental devastation to salvation, redemption, and a new creation.
Creation Untamed
Author: Terence E. Fretheim
Publisher: Baker Academic
ISBN: 0801038936
Pages: 176
Year: 2010-09-01
View: 1126
Read: 339
A leading Old Testament theologian addresses one of the most vexing questions in Christian life and theology: What is God's role in natural disasters?
The Concept of Biblical Theology
Author: James Barr
Publisher: Fortress Press
ISBN: 1451410255
Pages: 715
Year: 2009-12-01
View: 1011
Read: 294
A major overview and provocative analysis from a premier Old Testament scholar.
A Biblical Theology of Exile
Author: Daniel L. Smith-Christopher
Publisher: Fortress Press
ISBN: 1451405790
Pages: 209
Year:
View: 737
Read: 866
The Christian church continues to seek ethical and spiritual models from the period of Israel's monarchy and has avoided the gravity of the Babylonian exile. Against this tradition, the author argues that the period of focus for the canonical construction of biblical thought is precisely the exile. Here the voices of dissent arose and articulated words of truth in the context of failed power.
The Descent of God
Author: Joseph M. Hallman
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1592444830
Pages: 166
Year: 2004-01-20
View: 773
Read: 159

Texts of Terror
Author: Phyllis Trible
Publisher:
ISBN: 0334029007
Pages: 128
Year: 2002
View: 689
Read: 449
In this book, Phyllis Trible examines four Old Testament narratives of suffering in ancient Israel: Hagar, Tamar, an unnamed concubine and the daughter of Jephthah. These stories are for Trible the "substance of life", which may imspire new beginnings and by interpreting these stories of outrage and suffering on behalf of their female victims, the author recalls a past that is all to embodied in the present, and prays that these terrors shall not come to pass again. "Texts of Terror" is perhaps Trible's most readable book, that brings biblical scholarship within the grasp of the non-specialist. These "sad stories" about women in the Old Testament prompt much refelction on contemporary misuse of the Bible, and therefore have considerable relevance today.
What Does the Bible Say About Suffering?
Author: Brian Han Gregg
Publisher: InterVarsity Press
ISBN: 0830893539
Pages:
Year: 2016-09-09
View: 572
Read: 1269
The quest for an answer to the problem of suffering is universal. People often treat Scripture like a manual, looking for a single clear response that explains the presence of evil and suffering. Brian Han Gregg thinks we should take a different approach. The Bible does not have one but many responses to suffering. To pick out one theme is to hear the sopranos but miss the choir. We need to listen to the whole biblical narrative to appreciate its multifaceted handling of the problem. What Does the Bible Say About Suffering? explores twelve themes related to the issue of human suffering and reflects on what we can learn from the diversity of the biblical witness. Readable and informed by biblical scholarship, this book is a timely resource for students, small groups and anyone looking for a fresh approach to a topic of perennial interest.
The Bible as Word of God
Author: Terence Fretheim, Karlfried Froehlich
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1579108466
Pages: 144
Year: 2001-12-26
View: 491
Read: 276

Creation, Fall, and Flood
Author: Terence E. Fretheim
Publisher: Augsburg Books
ISBN: 0806693592
Pages: 127
Year: 1969
View: 1008
Read: 687

Prayer in the Hebrew Bible
Author: Samuel Eugene Balentine
Publisher: Fortress Press
ISBN: 1451418078
Pages: 311
Year:
View: 288
Read: 290
Balentine invites the reader to consider several aspects of prayer in the Hebrew Bible: prayer and the depiction of character, prayer and the characterization of God, prayers for divine justice, the lament tradition, sensible praise, prayer in Old Testament theology, and the motif of the church as "a house of prayer".
The Love of God
Author: John C. Peckham
Publisher: InterVarsity Press
ISBN: 0830898808
Pages: 295
Year: 2015-08-28
View: 284
Read: 633
2015 Readers' Choice Award Winner "For God so loved the world . . ." We believe these words, but what do they really mean? Does God choose to love, or does God love necessarily? Is God's love emotional? Does the love of God include desire or enjoyment? Is God's love conditional? Can God receive love from human beings? Attempts to answer these questions have produced sharply divided pictures of God's relationship to the world. One widely held position is that of classical theism, which understands God as necessary, self-sufficient, perfect, simple, timeless, immutable and impassible. In this view, God is entirely unaffected by the world and his love is thus unconditional, unilateral and arbitrary. In the twentieth century, process theologians replaced classical theism with an understanding of God as bound up essentially with the world and dependent on it. In this view God necessarily feels all feelings and loves all others, because they are included within himself. In The Love of God, John Peckham offers a comprehensive canonical interpretation of divine love in dialogue with, and at times in contrast to, both classical and process theism. God's love, he argues, is freely willed, evaluative, emotional and reciprocal, given before but not without conditions. According to Peckham's reading of Scripture, the God who loves the world is both perfect and passible, both self-sufficient and desirous of reciprocal relationships with each person, so that "whoever believes in him shall not perish, but have eternal life."
The Message of Jonah
Author: Terence Fretheim
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1579103456
Pages: 142
Year: 2000-04-12
View: 1066
Read: 872
Examining the theological conflict at the heart of the Book of Jonah, Dr. Fretheim carefully expresses Jonah's powerful message, bringing a fresh perspective of God's mercy and forgiveness and its application in today's world.
The Suffering of God
Author: Terence E. Fretheim
Publisher: Fortress Press
ISBN: 1451418841
Pages: 203
Year: 1984
View: 1293
Read: 186
In this comprehensive and thought-provoking study, Terence Fretheim focuses on the theme of divine suffering, an aspect of our understanding of God which both the church and scholarship have neglected. Maintaining that "metaphors matter," Fretheim carefully examines the ruling and anthropomorphic metaphors of the Old Testament and discusses them in the context of current biblical-theological scholarship. His aim is to broaden our understanding of the God of the Old Testament by showing that "suffering belongs to the person and purpose of God".
From Creation to New Creation
Author: Bernhard W. Anderson
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 159752039X
Pages: 272
Year: 2005-01-26
View: 389
Read: 220
Princeton theologian Bernhard Anderson explores the historical, mythopoeic, and theological dimensions of classic Old Restament reflections on the motif of creation. The result is an abundance of fresh insight and compelling exegesis that have implications for human life and thought today.

Recently Visited