The Moon And How To Observe It Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

The Moon and How to Observe It
Author: Peter Grego
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1846282438
Pages: 274
Year: 2006-01-27
View: 760
Read: 873
This revolutionary new book is written for practical amateur astronomers who not only want to observe, but want to know the details of exactly what they are looking at. The Moon is the most commonly observed of all astronomical objects. This is the first book to deal equally with the Moon itself - its formation, geology, and history - as well as the practical aspects of observation. The concept of the book - and of the series - is to present an up-to-date detailed description of the Moon, including its origins, history, and geology (part one); and then (part two) to consider how best to observe and record it successfully using commercially-available equipment. The Moon and How to Observe It is a mine of information for all levels of amateur observers, from the beginner to the experienced
The Moon and How to Observe It
Author: Peter Grego
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1852337486
Pages: 274
Year: 2005-09-28
View: 907
Read: 389
This revolutionary new book is written for practical amateur astronomers who not only want to observe, but want to know the details of exactly what they are looking at. The Moon is the most commonly observed of all astronomical objects. This is the first book to deal equally with the Moon itself - its formation, geology, and history - as well as the practical aspects of observation. The concept of the book - and of the series - is to present an up-to-date detailed description of the Moon, including its origins, history, and geology (part one); and then (part two) to consider how best to observe and record it successfully using commercially-available equipment. The Moon and How to Observe It is a mine of information for all levels of amateur observers, from the beginner to the experienced
Mars and How to Observe It
Author: Peter Grego
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461423023
Pages: 238
Year: 2012-06-06
View: 1136
Read: 1299
Mars, popularly known as the Red Planet because of its distinct color, is visible with the naked eye and is one of very few planets in the Solar System in which it is possible to see weather phenomena and surface features and thus is a favorite for amateur and practical astronomers. Commercially made telescopes can reveal its dusty surface markings, brilliant polar ice caps, and atmospheric phenomena. Many of Mars's features appear to change shape and intensity with the seasons: its polar caps grow and shrink cyclically, clouds billow above the Martian surface, and sometimes great dust storms obscure vast sections of the planet. The first part of Mars and How to Observe It sets out our current knowledge of Mars as a planet - its orbit, physical characteristics, evolution over time, and current geology. A planet-wide tour of Mars's topography is featured, along with clearly labeled maps and close-up images of a variety of features. The second part of the book explains how amateur and practical astronomers can observe Mars successfully. Many aspects are considered in depth, including preparing to observe, calculating phase and tilt, and making observational sketches and drawings. There are also plenty of details about how best to make high-resolution CCD images. Since Mars changes in its apparent size in the sky according to its position in relation to Earth, it is best observed during its closest approaches. Future apparitions (appearances of the Red Planet) are therefore featured.
Lunar Meteoroid Impacts and How to Observe Them
Author: Brian Cudnik
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1441903240
Pages: 240
Year: 2010-03-10
View: 1046
Read: 704
The genesis of modern searches for observable meteoritic phenomena on the Moon is the paper by Lincoln La Paz in Popular Astronomy magazine in 1938. In it he argued that the absence of observed fashes of meteoritic impacts on the Moon might be interpreted to mean that these bodies are destroyed as luminous meteors in an extremely rarefed lunar atmosphere. The paper suggested the possibility of systematic searches for such possible lunar meteors. With these concepts in mind, I was surprised to note a transient moving bright speck on the Moon on July 10, 1941. It appeared to behave very much as a lunar meteor would – except that the poorly estimated duration would lead to a strongly hyperbolic heliocentric velocity. Thus, the idea of systematic searches for both p- sible lunar meteors and meteoritic impact fashes was born. It was appreciated that much time might need to be expended to achieve any positive results. Systematic searches were carried out by others and myself chiefy in the years 1945–1965 and became a regular program at the newly founded Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers, or ALPO.
Observing the Moon
Author: Peter T. Wlasuk
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1447104838
Pages: 182
Year: 2013-04-17
View: 681
Read: 958
Why write another guide to observing the Moon? That was the question I was pondering as I began this project, having a fine collection of "classic" lunar guidebooks dating back to 1791 in my own library. As a Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS), member of the American Astronomical Society's Division for Planetary Sciences (AAS DPS), and member of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), I am fortunate to know many pro fessionallunar scientists who keep me up to date with developments in lunar scienc- contrary to public perception, lunar science has definitely not stagnated since the last Apollo, No. 17, left the surface of the Moon in December, 1972. I am also lucky to know many amateur lunar observers, who, like me, enjoy actually looking at the Moon with tele scopes and imaging it with a wide variety of devices ranging from regular 35 mm cameras to video recorders and CCD cameras. My friends who study the Moon, whether in their professions or just for fun, gave me several reasons for doing "another" lunar guidebook. First, the last lunar observer's guide of any length was published over ten years ago, and many reviewers noted that it was badly out of date even then.
Exploring the Moon Through Binoculars and Small Telescopes
Author: Ernest H. Cherrington
Publisher: Courier Corporation
ISBN: 0486150771
Pages: 240
Year: 2013-01-18
View: 1328
Read: 1096
DIVInformative, profusely illustrated guide to locating and identifying craters, rills, seas, mountains, other lunar features. Newly revised and updated with special section of new photos. Over 100 photos and diagrams. /div
Discover the Moon
Author: Jean Lacroux, Christian Legrand
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521535557
Pages: 143
Year: 2003
View: 346
Read: 703
Guide to discovering lunar sites, for beginners.
Observing the Moon
Author: Gerald North
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139464949
Pages:
Year: 2007-07-05
View: 636
Read: 1215
Written by an experienced and well-known lunar observer, this is a hands-on primer for the aspiring observer of the Moon. Whether you are a novice or are already experienced in practical astronomy, you will find plenty in this book to help you raise your game to the next level and beyond. In this thoroughly updated second edition, the author provides extensive practical advice and sophisticated background knowledge of the Moon and of lunar observation. It incorporates the latest developments in lunar imaging techniques, including digital photography, CCD imaging and webcam observing, and essential advice on collimating all common types of telescope. Learn what scientists have discovered about our Moon, and what mysteries remain still to be solved. Find out how you can take part in the efforts to solve these mysteries, as well as enjoying the Moon's spectacular magnificence for yourself!
Observing the Solar System
Author: Gerald North
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139576690
Pages:
Year: 2012-10-25
View: 233
Read: 1146
Written by a well-known and experienced amateur astronomer, this is a practical primer for all aspiring observers of the planets and other Solar System objects. Whether you are a beginner or more advanced astronomer, you will find all you need in this book to help develop your knowledge and skills and move on to the next level of observing. This up-to-date, self-contained guide provides a detailed and wide-ranging background to Solar System astronomy, along with extensive practical advice and resources. Topics covered include: traditional visual observing techniques using telescopes and ancillary equipment; how to go about imaging astronomical bodies; how to conduct measurements and research of scientifically useful quality; the latest observing and imaging techniques. Whether your interests lie in observing aurorae, meteors, the Sun, the Moon, asteroids, comets, or any of the major planets, you will find all you need here to help you get started.
Saturn and How to Observe It
Author: Julius Benton
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1846280451
Pages: 182
Year: 2007-04-03
View: 1230
Read: 955
Modern comprehensive review of the formation, astronomy, and structure of Saturn and its ring system, and observing techniques for amateurs Very latest detailed theories and physical descriptions How to observe and image the Saturn, its moon and ring, using a variety of telescope apertures and magnifications
Moon Observer's Guide
Author: Peter Grego
Publisher: Firefly Books
ISBN: 1552978885
Pages: 192
Year: 2004-01-01
View: 643
Read: 1045
A practical introduction to viewing the Moon offers detailed maps and images of lunar features, tips on choosing equipment, and advice on observing and photographing lunar eclipses.
The Moon and How to Observe It
Author: Peter Grego
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1846282438
Pages: 274
Year: 2006-01-27
View: 1331
Read: 598
This revolutionary new book is written for practical amateur astronomers who not only want to observe, but want to know the details of exactly what they are looking at. The Moon is the most commonly observed of all astronomical objects. This is the first book to deal equally with the Moon itself - its formation, geology, and history - as well as the practical aspects of observation. The concept of the book - and of the series - is to present an up-to-date detailed description of the Moon, including its origins, history, and geology (part one); and then (part two) to consider how best to observe and record it successfully using commercially-available equipment. The Moon and How to Observe It is a mine of information for all levels of amateur observers, from the beginner to the experienced
What's Hot on the Moon Tonight?
Author: W. Andrew Planck
Publisher:
ISBN: 099087690X
Pages: 294
Year: 2014-11-10
View: 1080
Read: 222
This book takes you by the hand and introduces you to the most interesting objects that can be seen through a telescope as they are revealed night by night through the lunar month. The descriptions of the craters, mountains, rilles and domes that you can see are accompanied by brief explanations of the geologic processes that formed them. The book is designed to increase your enjoyment by increasing your understanding of how the Moon and its many fascinating features came to be.
Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto and How to Observe Them
Author: Richard Schmude, Jr.
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 0387766022
Pages: 232
Year: 2009-06-29
View: 798
Read: 566
This book is for two groups of people: those who want to study the remote planets with amateur astronomical equipment, and those who are just interested in learning about our knowledge of the remote planets. The Remote Planets, and How to Observe them is unique in that it gives a completely up-to-date summary of our current knowledge of the remote planets, and also explains how amateur astronomers can contribute to our knowledge of the remote planets. Readers are given some inspiring examples of people who, with modest commercially-made equipment, have made important contributions to our scientific knowledge. The observational section goes into great detail, including optical and CCD photometry, occultation measurements, imaging (including stacking and enhancement techniques) and polarization measurements. There are finder charts (from 2010 to 2026), complete with two sets of star-magnitudes in an appendix (one set of magnitudes are for photoelectric photometry and the other set is for visual photometry)
The Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas
Author: Alan Chu, Wolfgang Paech, Mario Weigand
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107019737
Pages: 192
Year: 2012-09-28
View: 167
Read: 684
Featuring 388 high-resolution photographs and concise descriptions of the Moon's topography, this atlas is an indispensable guide for amateur astronomers and astrophotographers.

Recently Visited