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The Making of Modern Korea
Author: Adrian Buzo
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317422775
Pages: 300
Year: 2016-09-08
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This fully updated third edition of The Making of Modern Korea provides a thorough, balanced and engaging history of Korea from 1876 to the present day. The text is unique in analysing domestic developments in the two Koreas in the wider context of regional and international affairs. Key features of the book include: • Comprehensive coverage of Korean history. • Expanded coverage of social and cultural affairs. • A new chapter covering the end of the Choson Dynasty in the context of Japanese imperialist expansionism. • Up-to-date analysis of important contemporary developments in both Koreas, including assessments of the Kim Jong Il and Kim Jong Un administrations and the North’s nuclear weapons program. • Comparative focus on North and South Korea. • An examination of Korea within its regional context. • A detailed chronology and suggestions for further reading. The Making of Modern Korea is a valuable one-volume resource for students of modern Korean history, international politics and Asian Studies.
Religion and the Making of Modern East Asia
Author: Thomas David DuBois
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139499467
Pages:
Year: 2011-04-18
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Religious ideas and actors have shaped Asian cultural practices for millennia and have played a decisive role in charting the course of its history. In this engaging and informative book, Thomas David DuBois sets out to explain how religion has influenced the political, social, and economic transformation of Asia from the fourteenth century to the present. Crossing a broad terrain from Tokyo to Tibet, the book highlights long-term trends and key moments, such as the expulsion of Catholic missionaries from Japan, or the Taiping Rebellion in China, when religion dramatically transformed the political fate of a nation. Contemporary chapters reflect on the wartime deification of the Japanese emperor, Marxism as religion, the persecution of the Dalai Lama, and the fate of Asian religion in a globalized world.
The Park Chung Hee Era
Author: Byung-Kook Kim, Ezra F. Vogel
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674061063
Pages: 744
Year: 2011-04-01
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In 1959 South Korea was mired in poverty. By 1979, it had a powerful industrial economy and a vibrant civil society that led to democracy eight years later. This volume examines the transformation as a study in the politics of modernization, contextualizing many historical ambiguities in South Korea’s trajectory toward sustainable economic growth.
Contemporary Japanese Politics
Author: Tomohito Shinoda
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 023115853X
Pages: 352
Year: 2013-08-27
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Decentralized policy-making power in Japan had developed under the long reign of the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP). In the1990s, institutional changes were introduced, fundamentally altering Japan's modern political landscape. Tomohito Shinoda tracks these slow yet steady changes to today in the operation of and tensions between Japan's political parties and the public's behavior in Japanese elections, as well as in the government's ability to coordinate diverse policy preferences and respond to political crises.Electoral reform in 1994 resulted in the selection of Junichiro Koiz...
East Asian Transformation
Author: Jeffrey Henderson, William Goodwin Aurelio Professor of Greek Language and Literature Jeffrey Henderson
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 113684113X
Pages: 184
Year: 2011-02-25
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This book brings together benchmark essays in the field of global political economy, covering the key political-economic issues of East Asian development: the relation between the state and markets; the changing nature of economic governance and its relation to inequality; and the rise of China and its international consequences.
Popular Culture and the State in East and Southeast Asia
Author: Nissim Otmazgin, Eyal Ben-Ari
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136622950
Pages: 232
Year: 2013-03-01
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This volume examines the relations between popular culture production and export and the state in East and Southeast Asia including the urban centres and middle-classes of Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Singapore, Indonesia, Malaysia, China, Thailand, and the Philippines. It addresses the shift in official thinking toward the role of popular culture in the political life of states brought about by the massive circulation of cultural commodities and the possibilities for attaining "soft power". In contrast to earlier studies, this volume pays particular attention to the role of states and cross-state cultural interactions in these processes. It is the first major attempt to look at these issues comparatively and to provide an important corrective to the limitations of existing scholarship on popular culture in Asia that have usually neglected its political aspects. As part of this move, the essays in this volume suggest a widening of disciplinary perspectives. Hitherto, the preponderance of relevant studies has been in cultural and media fields, anthropology or history. Here the contributors explicitly draw on other disciplinary perspectives – political science and international relations, political economy, law, and policy studies – to explore the complex interrelationships between the state, politics and economics, and popular culture. This book will be of interest to students and scholars of Asian culture, society and politics, the sociology of culture, political science and media studies.
Nation Building in South Korea
Author: Gregg A. Brazinsky
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807867799
Pages: 328
Year: 2009-11-20
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In this ambitious and innovative study Gregg Brazinsky examines American nation building in South Korea during the Cold War. Marshaling a vast array of new American and Korean sources, he explains why South Korea was one of the few postcolonial nations that achieved rapid economic development and democratization by the end of the twentieth century. Brazinsky contends that a distinctive combination of American initiatives and Korean agency enabled South Korea's stunning transformation. On one hand, Americans supported the emergence of a developmental autocracy that spurred economic growth in a highly authoritarian manner. On the other hand, Americans sought to encourage democratization from the bottom up by fashioning new institutions and promoting a dialogue about modernization and development. Expanding the framework of traditional diplomatic history, Brazinsky examines not only state-to-state relations, but also the social and cultural interactions between Americans and South Koreans. He shows how Koreans adapted, resisted, and transformed American influence and promoted socioeconomic change that suited their own aspirations. Ultimately, Brazinsky argues, Koreans' capacity to tailor American institutions and ideas to their own purposes was the most important factor in the making of a democratic South Korea.
The Making of Minjung
Author: Namhee Lee
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801445663
Pages: 349
Year: 2007
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"This book is the best, and virtually the only, political ethnography of South Korean antigovernment political activism by students and intellectuals during the 1980s."—Korean Studies
Park Chung Hee and Modern Korea
Author: Carter J. Eckert
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674659864
Pages: 472
Year: 2016-11-07
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For South Koreans, the early 1960s to late 1970s were the best and worst of times—a period of unprecedented economic growth and deepening political oppression. Carter J. Eckert finds the roots of this dramatic socioeconomic transformation in the country’s long history of militarization, personified in South Korea’s paramount leader, Park Chung Hee.
After Development
Author: Sung Deuk Hahm, L. Christopher Plein
Publisher: Georgetown University Press
ISBN: 0878406603
Pages: 171
Year: 1997
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This book explores the dynamic changes now taking place in the South Korean government as a result of recent social and economic liberalization. Sung Deuk Hahm and L. Christopher Plein trace the emergence in Korea of a post-developmental state, in which both increasingly autonomous capital interests and growing public expectations of a higher quality of life challenge existing authoritarian institutions. Separating out the constituent parts of the Korean state, they then explore the evolving roles of the Korean presidency and bureaucracy in setting national policy. The authors analyze the importance of social and cultural factors, as well as the motives of individual political actors, in shaping institutional change in Korea. They show how shifting socioeconomic conditions have altered the way political decisions are made. Hahm and Plein illustrate these transitions with concrete examples of policy making in the area of technology development and transfer--an area of critical importance to Korea's rapid modernization.
Routledge Handbook of Modern Korean History
Author: Michael J Seth
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317811488
Pages: 396
Year: 2016-01-29
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Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century when Korea became entangled in the world of modern imperialism and the old social, economic and political order began to change; this handbook brings together cutting edge scholarship on major themes in Korean History. Contributions by experts in the field cover the Late Choson and Colonial periods, Korea’s partition and the diverging paths of North and South Korea. Topics covered include: The division of Korea Religion Competing imperialisms Economic change War and rebellions Nationalism Gender North Korea Under Kim Jong Il Global Korea The Handbook provides a stimulating introduction to the most important themes within the subject area, and is an invaluable reference work for any student and researcher of Korean History.
Religious Transformation in Modern Asia
Author:
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004289712
Pages: 340
Year: 2015-03-27
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Religious Transformation in Modern Asia offers phenomenological glimpses of the religious transition in 18th to 20th centuries. The colonial experience of indigenous Asian people, as case studies, will be expounded in relation to the emergence of a new religion, Christianity.
Echoes of the Past, Epics of Dissent
Author: Nancy Abelmann
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520917480
Pages: 467
Year: 1996-11-14
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Echoes of the Past, Epics of Dissent, the story of a South Korean social movement, offers a window to a decade of tumultuous social protest in a postcolonial, divided nation. Abelmann brings a dramatic chapter of modern Korean history to life—a period in which farmers, student activists, and organizers joined to protest the corporate ownership of tenant plots never distributed in the 1949 Land Reform. From public sites of protest to backstage meetings and negotiations, from farming villages to university campuses, Abelmann's highly original study explores this movement as a complex process always in the making. Her discussion moves fluently between past and present, local and national, elites and dominated, and urban and rural. Touching on major historical issues, this ethnography of dissent explores contemporary popular nationalism and historical consciousness.
Korea: The Impossible Country
Author: Daniel Tudor
Publisher: Tuttle Publishing
ISBN: 146291022X
Pages: 336
Year: 2012-11-10
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South Korea's amazing rise from the ashes: the inside story of an economic, political, and cultural phenomenon Long overshadowed by Japan and China, South Korea is a small country that happens to be one of the great national success stories of the postwar period. From a failed state with no democratic tradition, ruined and partitioned by war, and sapped by a half-century of colonial rule, South Korea transformed itself in just fifty years into an economic powerhouse and a democracy that serves as a model for other countries. With no natural resources and a tradition of authoritarian rule, Korea managed to accomplish a second Asian miracle. Daniel Tudor is a journalist who has lived in and written about Korea for almost a decade. In Korea: The Impossible Country, Tudor examines Korea's cultural foundations; the Korean character; the public sphere in politics, business, and the workplace as well as the family, dating, and marriage. In doing so, he touches on topics as diverse as shamanism, clan-ism, the dilemma posed by North Korea, the myths about doing business in Korea, the Koreans' renowned hard-partying ethos, and why the infatuation with learning English is now causing huge social problems. South Korea has undergone two miracles at once: economic development and complete democratization. The question now is, will it become as some see Japan, a rich yet aging society, devoid of energy and momentum? Or will the dynamism of Korean society and its willingness to change—as well as the opportunity it has now to welcome outsiders into its fold—enable it to experience a third miracle that will propel it into the ranks of the world's leading nations in terms of human culture, democracy, and wealth? More than just one journalist's account, Korea: The Impossible Country also draws on interviews with many of the people who made South Korea what it is today. These include: Choi Min-sik, the star of "Old Boy". Park Won-soon, Mayor of Seoul. Soyeon Yi, Korea's first astronaut Hong Myung-bo, legendary captain of Korea's 2002 FIFA World Cup team. Shin Joong-hyun, the 'Godfather of Korean Rock'. Ko Un, poet. Hong Seok-cheon, restaurateur, and the first Korean celebrity to 'come out'. And many more, including a former advisor to President Park Chung-hee; a Shaman priestess ('mudang'); the boss of Korea's largest matchmaking agency; a 'room salon' hostess; an architect; as well as chefs, musicians, academics, entrepreneurs, homemakers, and chaebol conglomerate employees.
Japan's Quiet Transformation
Author: Jeff Kingston
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134478275
Pages: 384
Year: 2004-08-02
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The 1990s have been termed as 'Japan's lost decade' to describe how the phenomenal growth in the Japanese economy ground to a halt and the country was crippled by enormous and ongoing political, economic and social problems. In responding to these unprecedented difficulties, wide-ranging reforms have been adopted including NPO, information disclosure and judicial reform legislation. Controversially, this book argues that such reforms are creating a more robust civil society and demonstrate that Japan is far more dynamic than is generally recognized.