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The First Punic War
Author: John Lazenby
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134214227
Pages: 224
Year: 2016-04-29
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First Published in 1996. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Hannibal's War
Author: John Francis Lazenby
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806130040
Pages: 340
Year: 1998
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Hannibal is acknowledged to be one of history's greatest generals, and his crossing of the Alps - complete with elephants - to make war against Rome on its home soil is legendary. But even Hannibal met his match in Scipio, and ultimately Carthage was defeated by the rising power of Rome. In Hannibal's War, J. F. Lazenby provides the first scholarly account in English since 1886 solely devoted to the Second Punic War - what some have called the first "world war" for mastery of the Mediterranean world. By closely examining the accounts of Livy and Polybius, supplemented with the fruits of modern research, Lazenby provides a detailed military history of the entire war as it was fought in Italy, Spain, Greece, and North Africa. This edition includes a new preface covering recent research on Hannibal's war against Rome.
A Critical History of Early Rome
Author: Gary Forsythe
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520249917
Pages: 400
Year: 2006
View: 162
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Traces the history of early Rome, covering such topics as religion, language, and culture.
Early Roman Warfare
Author: Jeremy Armstrong
Publisher: Pen and Sword
ISBN: 1473880165
Pages: 192
Year: 2016-09-19
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While copious amounts have been written about the Roman army, most study has focussed on the later Republic or the Imperial period when the legionary system was already well-developed. Here Dr Jeremy Armstrong traces the development of Rome's military might from its earliest discernible origins down to the First Punic War. He shows how her armies evolved from ad-hoc forces of warriors organized along clan lines and assembled for the city's survival, to the sophisticated organization of the legions that went on to dominate all of Italy and then (after the period covered) the entire Mediterranean world. The author reviews both the literary sources and the latest archaeological evidence to provide a fresh analysis of Roman military organization, equipment, tactics and strategy. He shows how Rome's military apparatus adapted to meet the changing strategic needs of new enemies and broader ambitions. This study of the origins of the Classical world's most formidable war machine will be welcomed by anyone with an interest in Classical, and especially Roman, military history.

Hannibal
Author: Theodore Ayrault Dodge
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 682
Year: 1891
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Cannae
Author: Gregory Daly
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134507127
Pages: 280
Year: 2005-08-18
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On a hot and dusty summer's day in 216 BC, the forces of the Carthaginian general Hannibal faced the Roman army in a dramatic encounter at Cannae. Massively outnumbered, the Carthaginians nevertheless won an astonishing victory - one that left more than 50,000 men dead. Gregory Daly's enthralling study considers the reasons that led the two armies to the field of battle, and why each followed the course that they did when they got there. It explores in detail the composition of the armies, and the tactics and leadership methods of the opposing generals. Finally, by focusing on the experiences of those who fought, Daly gives an unparalleled portrait of the true horror and chaos of ancient warfare. This striking and vivid account is the fullest yet of the bloodiest battle in ancient history.
Rome Spreads Her Wings
Author: Gareth Sampson
Publisher: Pen and Sword
ISBN: 1473874548
Pages: 304
Year: 2016-06-19
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The two decades between the end of the First Punic War and the beginning of the Second represent a key period in the development of Rome’s imperial ambitions, both within Italy and beyond. Within Italy, Rome faced an invasion of Gauls from Northern Italy, which threatened the very existence of the Roman state. This war culminated at the Battle of Telamon and the final Roman victory against the Gauls of Italy, giving Rome control of the peninsula up to the Alps for the first time in her history. Beyond the shores of Italy, Rome acquired her first provinces, in the form of Sardinia and Corsica, established footholds in Sicily and Spain and crossed the Adriatic to establish a presence on the Greek mainland, bringing Rome into the orbit of the Hellenistic World. Yet this period is often treated as nothing more than an intermission between the two better known Punic Wars, with each Roman campaign being made seemingly in anticipation of a further conflict with Carthage. Such a view overlooks two key factors that emerge from these decades: firstly, that Rome faced a far graver threat in the form of the Gauls of Northern Italy than she had faced at the hands of the Carthaginians in the First Punic War; secondly, that the foundations for Rome’s overseas empire were laid in these very decades. This work seeks to redress the balance and view these wars in their own right, analyse how close Rome came to being defeated in Italy and asses the importance of these decades as a key period in the foundation of Rome’s future empire.
Hannibal
Author: Richard A. Gabriel
Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.
ISBN: 1597976865
Pages: 288
Year: 2011-02-28
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The Romans' destruction of Carthage after the Third Punic War erased any Carthaginian historical record of Hannibal's life. What we know of him comes exclusively from Roman historians who had every interest in minimizing his success, exaggerating his failures, and disparaging his character. The charges leveled against Hannibal include greed, cruelty and atrocity, sexual indulgence, and even cannibalism. But even these sources were forced to grudgingly admit to Hannibal's military genius, if only to make their eventual victory over him appear greater. Yet there is no doubt that Hannibal was the greatest Carthaginian general of the Second Punic War. When he did not defeat them outright, he fought to a standstill the best generals Rome produced, and he sustained his army in the field for sixteen long years without mutiny or desertion. Hannibal was a first-rate tactician, only a somewhat lesser strategist, and the greatest enemy Rome ever faced. When he at last met defeat at the hands of the Roman general Scipio, it was against an experienced officer who had to strengthen and reconfigure the Roman legion and invent mobile tactics in order to succeed. Even so, Scipio's victory at Zama was against an army that was a shadow of its former self. The battle could easily have gone the other way. If it had, the history of the West would have been changed in ways that can only be imagined. Richard A. Gabriel's brilliant new biography shows how Hannibal's genius nearly unseated the Roman Empire.
The First Punic War
Author: Polybius
Publisher: Classic Comic Store Ltd.
ISBN: 1681003449
Pages: 36
Year: 2014-01-13
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The First Punic War (264 to 241 BC) was the first of three wars fought between Ancient Carthage and the Roman Republic. For nearly 20 years, the two powers struggled for supremacy in the western Mediterranean Sea and has been called "the longest and most severely contested war in history".
The Punic Wars
Author: Adrian Keith Goldsworthy
Publisher: Weidenfeld & Nicolson
ISBN: 030435967X
Pages: 412
Year: 2000
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The struggle between Rome and Carthage in the Punic Wars was arguably the greatest and most desperate conflict of Antiquity. The forces involved and the casualties suffered by both sides were far greater than in any wars fought before the modern era, while the eventual outcome had far reaching consequences for the history of the Western World, namely the ascendancy of Rome. An epic of war and battle, this is also the story of famous generals and leaders: Hannibal, Fabius Maximus, Scipio Africanus, and his grandson Scipio Aemilianus who would finally bring down the walls of Carthage.
The Ghosts of Cannae
Author: Robert L. O'Connell
Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks
ISBN: 0812978676
Pages: 310
Year: 2011-09
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A dramatic account of the violent ancient battle traces the massive defeat of the huge but inexperienced Roman army by Hannibal's forces, interpreting the larger course of the Second Punic War and the often-disastrous ways in which the battle has been imitated throughout history.
The Roman Army of the Punic Wars 264–146 BC
Author: Nic Fields
Publisher: Osprey Publishing
ISBN: 1846031451
Pages: 96
Year: 2007-05-22
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Long before the Second Punic War (218 - 201 BC), Rome's influence extended no further than the Alps, and the wars that it fought consisted of small-scale raids and cattle rustling, with perhaps the occasional battle between armies. Nevertheless, within a century the seeds of an empire had been sown in Iberia, Africa, and the Greek east, and the Roman Republican army became the most successful of its day, establishing standards of discipline, organization, and efficiency that set a bench mark for the later armies of Rome. With the evolution of the Roman Republic came the adoption of the Manipular legion, a formation taken from the hoplite phalanx and first used in mass deployment against the North African nation of Carthage, during the Punic Wars. In this book Nic Fields examines the evolution of the Roman army from its defeat at Cannae through to their final success at Zama which saw a small city-based force evolve into a Mediterranean powerhouse, demonstrating how and why it became the most highly organized, sophisticated force in the ancient world.
Hannibal's campaigns
Author: Tony Bath
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 143
Year: 1992
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Hannibal Crosses The Alps
Author: John Prevas
Publisher: Da Capo Press
ISBN: 0786731214
Pages: 256
Year: 2009-03-05
View: 357
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When he left his Spanish base one spring day in 218 B.C. with his 100,000-man army of mercenaries, officers, and elephants, Hannibal was launching not just the main offensive of the Second Punic War but also one of the great military journeys in ancient history. His masterful advance through rough terrain and fierce Celtic tribes proved his worth as a leader, but it was his extraordinary passage through the Alps—still considered treacherous even by modern climbers—that made him a legend. John Prevas combines rigorous research of ancient sources with his own excursions through the icy peaks to bring to life this awesome trek, solving the centuries-old question of Hannibal's exact route and shedding fresh light on the cultures of Rome and Carthage along the way. Here is the finest kind of history, sure to appeal to readers of Steven Pressfield's Gates of Fire: alive with grand strategy, the clash of empires, fabulous courage, and the towering figure of Hannibal Barca.

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