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The Christian Imagination
Author: Willie James Jennings
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300163088
Pages: 366
Year: 2010
View: 473
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The Christian Imagination
Author: Willie James Jennings
Publisher:
ISBN: 0300171366
Pages: 366
Year: 2011
View: 1143
Read: 1037
Weaving together the stories of Zurara, the royal chronicler of Prince Henry, the Jesuit theologian Jose de Acosta, the famed Anglican Bishop John William Colenso, and the former slave writer Olaudah Equiano, Jennings narrates a tale of loss, forgetfulness, and missed opportunities for the transformation of Christian communities. Touching on issues of slavery, geography, Native American history, Jewish-Christian relations, literacy, and translation, he brilliantly exposes how the loss of land and the supersessionist ideas behind the Christian missionary movement are both deeply implicated in the invention of race.
The Christian Imagination
Author: Willie James Jennings
Publisher:
ISBN: 0300152116
Pages: 366
Year: 2010
View: 291
Read: 926
Weaving together the stories of Zurara, the royal chronicler of Prince Henry, the Jesuit theologian Jose de Acosta, the famed Anglican Bishop John William Colenso, and the former slave writer Olaudah Equiano, Jennings narrates a tale of loss, forgetfulness, and missed opportunities for the transformation of Christian communities. Touching on issues of slavery, geography, Native American history, Jewish-Christian relations, literacy, and translation, he brilliantly exposes how the loss of land and the supersessionist ideas behind the Christian missionary movement are both deeply implicated in the invention of race.
Race
Author: J. Kameron Carter
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199882371
Pages: 504
Year: 2008-09-02
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In Race: A Theological Account, J. Kameron Carter meditates on the multiple legacies implicated in the production of a racialized world and that still mark how we function in it and think about ourselves. These are the legacies of colonialism and empire, political theories of the state, anthropological theories of the human, and philosophy itself, from the eighteenth-century Enlightenment to the present. Carter's claim is that Christian theology, and the signal transformation it (along with Christianity) underwent, is at the heart of these legacies. In that transformation, Christian anti-Judaism biologized itself so as to racialize itself. As a result, and with the legitimation of Christian theology, Christianity became the cultural property of the West, the religious ground of white supremacy and global hegemony. In short, Christianity became white. The racial imagination is thus a particular kind of theological problem. Not content only to describe this problem, Carter constructs a way forward for Christian theology. Through engagement with figures as disparate in outlook and as varied across the historical landscape as Immanuel Kant, Frederick Douglass, Jarena Lee, Michel Foucault, Cornel West, Albert Raboteau, Charles Long, James Cone, Irenaeus of Lyons, Gregory of Nyssa, and Maximus the Confessor, Carter reorients the whole of Christian theology, bringing it into the twenty-first century. Neither a simple reiteration of Black Theology nor another expression of the new theological orthodoxies, this groundbreaking book will be a major contribution to contemporary Christian theology, with ramifications in other areas of the humanities.
Acts
Author: Willie James Jennings
Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press
ISBN: 161164805X
Pages: 272
Year: 2017-05-05
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In this new commentary for the Belief series, award-winning author and theologian Willie James Jennings explores the relevance of the book of Acts for the struggles of today. While some see Acts as the story of the founding of the Christian church, Jennings argues that it is so much more, depicting revolution—life in the disrupting presence of the Spirit of God. According to Jennings, Acts is like Genesis, revealing a God who is moving over the land, "putting into place a holy repetition that speaks of the willingness of God to invade our every day and our every moment." He reminds us that Acts took place in a time of Empire, when the people were caught between diaspora Israel and the Empire of Rome. The spirit of God intervened, offering new life to both. Jennings shows that Acts teaches how people of faith can yield to the Spirit to overcome the divisions of our present world.
Race and Theology
Author: Elaine A. Robinson
Publisher: Abingdon Press
ISBN: 0687494257
Pages: 104
Year: 2012
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Even in the Church, justice for some is justice for none.
Work in the Spirit
Author: Miroslav Volf
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1579106412
Pages: 268
Year: 2001-04-27
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Since the rise of modern industrial society, work has come to pervade and rule the lives of men and women. Although there have been many popular books and church documents on on the Christian understanding of work, this is the first scholarly effort to articulate a developed Protestant theology of work. In Work in the Spirit, Miroslav Volf interprets work from a new perspective - in terms of the doctrine of the Holy Spirit. He exhaustively explores the nature of work in both capitalist and socialist societies and considers a variety of work, including industrial, agricultural, medical, political, and artistic work. Examining the importance of alienation in work in industrial and information societies (particularly in the relation of workers to management and technology), he analyzes various forms of such alienation, and elucidates the character of humane work. On the basis of the ÒpneumatologicalÓ theology of work that he develops, Volf rejects the traditional Protestant understanding of work as vocation, and takes the concept of charisma as the cornerstone for his theological reflection on work. He denies that one is ÒcalledÓ to do a particular work irrespective of one's inclinations, and asserts, instead, that it is our privilege to do the kind of work for which God's spirit has gifted us. All human work done in accordance with the will of God, Volf argues, is cooperation with God in the preservation and transformation of the world.
One New Man
Author: Jarvis Williams
Publisher: B&H Publishing Group
ISBN: 1433673002
Pages: 208
Year: 2010-10-01
View: 1004
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In the Bible, Paul argues that sin has broken humanity’s relationship with God as well as his fellow man, and he recognizes Jesus as God’s provision for the universal problem of sin. Therefore, Christ’s death for our sin is God’s only solution to racial hostility and the only provision for racial reconciliation. Today, many Christians still allow cultural prejudices to shape their understanding of race instead of scripture. One New Man endeavors to help Christians understand what the gospel says about race and race relations by focusing on selected Pauline texts. Since many churches have either limited their ministry to those within their respective race or homogeneous unit (people within the same ethnic, social, cultural, linguistic, or class context), author Jarvis Williams aims to liberate individual Christians and churches from their bondage to racist ideologies, from a secular model of race relations, and from their disdain toward different races that arise from both the impact of their respective cultures and from the universal impact of sin. Endorsements "Finally. The church has waited too long for an exegetical excavation and application of the Bible's teaching about ethnicity, Christ, the cross, and our new humanity. Jarvis Williams serves us all by helping us to see more clearly the implications of Paul's theology of the cross and reconciliation. Heartily commended." Thabiti Anyabwile Senior Pastor, First Baptist Church of Grand Cayman "The Apostle Paul is clear: our vertical reconciliation with God occurs as he reconciles horizontally those who have been at enmity with one another, who then are reconciled together, as one new man, to God in Christ (Eph 2:14-18) . . . Jarvis Williams demonstrates in a clear and compelling way that racial reconciliation is no nice optional 'extra' to the substance and proclamation of the gospel but is at the heart of that message of the cross itself . . . the practical impact of this book is monumental." Bruce A. Ware Professor of Christian Theology, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary "Williams's book on racial reconciliation is an important contribution to a sadly neglected issue in our churches (and) is characterized by careful study of relevant biblical passages and suggestions for application. Particularly important . . . is the author's distinction between ethnic diversity and racial reconciliation. The church, he argues, must not be content with diversity; it must push forward to a biblically distinctive, Christ-centered and Spirit-led embrace of one another in love." Douglas J. Moo Blanchard Professor of New Testament, Wheaton College "One of the saddest realities of American church life is that too many of our congregations are racially and socially isolated. One of the most joyous realities of the contemporary American church is that God is calling out young leaders who are willing to seek to change this. Jarvis Williams is a brilliant, young New Testament scholar (with) a burning passion for churches that picture the gospel in their racial makeup and witness. Read this book and ask the Spirit to show you your place in helping the church model the 'one new man' of the gospel of Jesus Christ." Russell D. Moore Dean, School of Theology, and Senior Vice President for Academic Administration The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary
Redeeming Mulatto
Author: Brian Bantum
Publisher:
ISBN: 1602584826
Pages: 244
Year: 2014-05-14
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The theological attempts to understand Christ's body have either focused on "philosophical" claims about Jesus' identity or on "contextual" rebuttals--on a culturally transcendent, diesembodied Jesus of the creeds or on a Jesus of color who rescues and saves a particular people because of embodied particularity. But neither of these two attempts has accounted for the world as it is, a world of mixed race of hybridity, of cultural and racial intermixing. By not understanding the true theological problem, that we live in a mulatto world, the right question has not been posed: how can Christ save this mixed world? The answer, Brian Bantum shows, is in the mulattoness of Jesus' own body, which is simultaneously fully God and fully human. --From publisher's description.
Why Narrative?
Author: Stanley Hauerwas, L. Gregory Jones
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1579100651
Pages: 376
Year: 1997-10-28
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Narrative Theology is still with us, to the delight of some and to the chagrin of others. 'Why Narrative?Ó is in reprint because it represents what is still a very important question. This diverse collection of essays on narrative theology has proven very useful in university and seminary theology classes. It is also of great use as a primer for the educated layperson or church study group. Jones and Hauerwas have done an excellent job of selecting representative essays that deal with appeals to narrative in areas such as personal identity and human action, biblical hermeneutics, epistemology, and theological and ethical method.
A Theology of Race and Place
Author: Andrew T. Draper
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1498280838
Pages: 346
Year: 2016-08-26
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In a world marked by the effects of colonial displacements, slavery's auction block, and the modern observatory stance, can Christian theology adequately imagine racial reconciliation? What factors have created our society's racialized optic--a view by which nonwhite bodies are objectified, marginalized, and destroyed--and how might such a gaze be resisted? Is there hope for a church and academy marked by difference rather than assimilation? This book pursues these questions by surveying the works of Willie James Jennings and J. Kameron Carter, who investigate the genesis of the racial imagination to suggest a new path forward for Christian theology. Jennings and Carter both mount critiques of popular contemporary ways of theologically imagining Christian identity as a return to an ethic of virtue. Through fresh reads of both the "tradition" and liberation theology, these scholars point to the particular Jewish flesh of Jesus Christ as the ground for a new body politic. By drawing on a vast array of biblical, theological, historical, and sociological resources, including communal experiments in radical joining, A Theology of Race and Place builds upon their theological race theory by offering an ecclesiology of joining that resists the aesthetic hegemony of whiteness. .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }
Why This New Race
Author: Denise Kimber Buell
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231133359
Pages: 257
Year: 2008-08
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Denise Kimber Buell radically rethinks the origins of Christian identity, arguing that race and ethnicity played a central role in early Christian theology. Focusing on texts written before the legalization of Christianity in 313 C.E., including Greek apologetic treatises, martyr narratives, and works by Clement of Alexandria, Origen, Justin Martyr, and Tertullian, Buell shows how philosophers and theologians defined Christians as a distinct group within the Roman world, characterizing Christianness as something both fixed in its essence and fluid in its acquisition through conversion. Buell demonstrates how this view allowed Christians to establish boundaries around the meaning of Christianness and to develop the kind of universalizing claims aimed at uniting all members of the faith. Her arguments challenge generations of scholars who have refused to acknowledge ethnic reasoning in early Christian discourses. They also provide crucial insight into the historical legacy of Christian anti-Semitism and contemporary issues of race.
Toward a Womanist Ethic of Incarnation
Author: Eboni Marshall Turman
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137373881
Pages: 214
Year: 2013-12-18
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The Black Church is an institution that emerged in rebellion against injustice perpetrated upon black bodies. How is it, then, that black women's oppression persists in black churches? This book engages the Chalcedonian Definition as the starting point for exploring the body as a moral dilemma.
A Native American Theology
Author: Clara Sue Kidwell, Homer Noley, George E. Tinker
Publisher: Maryknoll, N.Y. : Orbis Books c2001.
ISBN: 157075361X
Pages: 204
Year: 2001-01-01
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This collaborative work represents a pathbreaking exercise in Native American theology. While observing traditional categories of Christian systematic theology (Creation, Deity, Christology, etc.), each of these is reimagined consistent with Native experience, values, and worldview. At the same time the authors introduce new categories from Native thought-worlds, such as the Trickster (eraser of boundaries, symbol of ambiguity), and Land. Finally, the authors address issues facing Native Americans today, including racism, poverty, stereotyping, cultural appropriation, and religious freedom. Book jacket.
The Color of Christ
Author: Edward J. Blum, Paul Harvey
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807835722
Pages: 340
Year: 2012
View: 521
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Explores the dynamic nature of Christ worship in the U.S., addressing how his image has been visually remade to champion the causes of white supremacists and civil rights leaders alike, and why the idea of a white Christ has endured.

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