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The Television History Book
Author: Michele Hilmes
Publisher: British Film Inst
ISBN: 0851709877
Pages: 163
Year: 2003
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Over the last half century, developments in television broadcasting have exerted an immeasurable influence over our social, cultural, and economic practices. With contributions by leading media scholars, The Television History Book presents an overview of the of history of broadcasting in Great Britain and the United States. With its integrated format, The Television History Book encourages readers to make connections between events and tendencies that both unite and differentiate these national broadcasting traditions. From the origins of the public service and commercial systems of broadcasting to the current period of technological and economic convergence, the book provides an accessible overview of the history of television technology, institutions, polices, programs, and audiences. The numerous "gray box" case studies illustrate the course of television innovation and are accompanied by lists of recommended further reading and an extensive bibliography Over the last half century, developments in television broadcasting have exerted an immeasurable influence over our social, cultural, and economic practices. With contributions by leading media scholars, The Television History Book presents an overview of the of history of broadcasting in Great Britain and the United States. With its integrated format, The Television History Book encourages readers to make connections between events and tendencies that both unite and differentiate these national broadcasting traditions. From the origins of the public service and commercial systems of broadcasting to the current period of technological and economic convergence, the book provides an accessible overview of the history of television technology, institutions, polices, programs, and audiences. The numerous "gray box" case studies illustrate the course of television innovation and are accompanied by lists of recommended further reading and an extensive bibliography
Milwaukee Television History
Author: Dick Golembiewski
Publisher:
ISBN: 0874620554
Pages: 507
Year: 2008
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"Milwaukee - not New York, Chicago or Los Angeleswas the scene of a number of television firsts: The Journal Company filed the very first application for a commercial TV license with the FCC in 1938. The first female program director and news director in a major market were both at Milwaukee stations. The city was a major battleground in the VHF vs. UHF war that began in the 1950s. The battle to put an educational TV station on the air was fought at the national, state and local levels by the Milwaukee Vocational School. WMVS-TV was the first educational TV station to run a regular schedule of colorcasts, and WMVT was the site of the first long-distance rest of a digital over-theair signal." "This detailed story of the rich history of the city's television stations since 1930 is told through facts, anecdotes, and quotations from the on-air talent, engineers, and managers who conceived, constructed, and put the stations on the air. Included are discussions of the many locally-produced shows - often done live - that once made up a large part of a station's broadcast day. Through these stories - some told here for the first time - and the book's extensive photographic images, the history of Milwaukee television comes alive again for the reader." "From the first early tests using mechanical scanning methods in the 1930s, through the first successful digital television tests, the politics, conflicts, triumphs, and failures of Milwaukee's television stations are described in fascinating detail." --Book Jacket.
Science on American Television
Author: Marcel Chotkowski LaFollette
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226922014
Pages: 304
Year: 2013-01-10
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As television emerged as a major cultural and economic force, many imagined that the medium would enhance civic education for topics like science. And, indeed, television soon offered a breathtaking banquet of scientific images and ideas—both factual and fictional. Mr. Wizard performed experiments with milk bottles. Viewers watched live coverage of solar eclipses and atomic bomb blasts. Television cameras followed astronauts to the moon, Carl Sagan through the Cosmos, and Jane Goodall into the jungle. Via electrons and embryos, blood testing and blasting caps, fictional Frankensteins and chatty Nobel laureates, television opened windows onto the world of science. But what promised to be a wonderful way of presenting science to huge audiences turned out to be a disappointment, argues historian Marcel Chotkowski LaFollette in Science on American Television. LaFollette narrates the history of science on television, from the 1940s to the turn of the twenty-first century, to demonstrate how disagreements between scientists and television executives inhibited the medium’s potential to engage in meaningful science education. In addition to examining the content of shows, she also explores audience and advertiser responses, the role of news in engaging the public in science, and the making of scientific celebrities. Lively and provocative, Science on American Television establishes a new approach to grappling with the popularization of science in the television age, when the medium’s ubiquity and influence shaped how science was presented and the scientific community had increasingly less control over what appeared on the air.
Blue Skies
Author: Patrick Parsons
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 1592137067
Pages: 816
Year: 2008-04-05
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Cable television is arguably the dominant mass media technology in the U.S. today. Blue Skies traces its history in detail, depicting the important events and people that shaped its development, from the precursors of cable TV in the 1920s and '30s to the first community antenna systems in the 1950s, and from the creation of the national satellite-distributed cable networks in the 1970s to the current incarnation of "info-structure" that dominates our lives. Author Patrick Parsons also considers the ways that economics, public perception, public policy, entrepreneurial personalities, the social construction of the possibilities of cable, and simple chance all influenced the development of cable TV. Since the 1960s, one of the pervasive visions of "cable" has been of a ubiquitous, flexible, interactive communications system capable of providing news, information, entertainment, diverse local programming, and even social services. That set of utopian hopes became known as the "Blue Sky" vision of cable television, from which the book takes its title. Thoroughly documented and carefully researched, yet lively, occasionally humorous, and consistently insightful, Blue Skies is the genealogy of our media society.
History on Television
Author: Ann Gray, Erin Bell
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0415580382
Pages: 246
Year: 2013
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In recent years non-fiction history programmes have flourished on television. This interdisciplinary study of history programming identifies and examines different genres employed by producers and tracks their commissioning, production, marketing and distribution histories. With comparative references to other European nations and North America, the authors focus on British history programming over the last two decades and analyse the relationship between the academy and media professionals. They outline and discuss often-competing discourses about how to 'do' history and the underlying assumptions about who watches history programmes. History on Television considers recent changes in the media landscape, which have affected to a great degree how history in general, and whose history in particular, appears onscreen. Through a number of case studies, using material from interviews by the authors with academic and media professionals, the role of the 'professional' historian and that of media professionals – commissioning editors and producer/directors - as mediators of historical material and interpretations is analysed, and the ways in which the 'logics of television' shape historical output are outlined and discussed. Building on their analysis, Ann Gray and Erin Bell ask if history on television fulfils its potential to be a form of public history through offering, as it does, a range of interpretations of the past to and originating from or including those not based in the academy. Through consideration of the representation, or absence, of the diversity of British identity – gender, ethnicity and race, social status and regional identities – the authors substantially extend the scope of existing scholarship into history on television History on Television will be essential reading for all those interested in the complex processes involved in the representation of history on television.
The IRA on Film and Television
Author: Mark Connelly
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786489618
Pages: 273
Year: 2012-04-25
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The Irish Republican Army (IRA) has for decades pursued the goal of unifying its homeland into a single sovereign nation, ending British rule in Northern Ireland. Over the years, the IRA has been dramatized in motion pictures directed by John Ford (The Informer), Carol Reed (Odd Man Out), David Lean (Ryan's Daughter), Neil Jordan (Michael Collins), and many others. Such international film stars as Liam Neeson, James Cagney, Richard Gere, James Mason and Anthony Hopkins have portrayed IRA members alternately as heroic patriots, psychotic terrorists and tormented rebels. This work analyzes cellu.
The Columbia History of American Television
Author: Gary R. Edgerton
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231121652
Pages: 493
Year: 2009-01-01
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Richly researched and engaging, The Columbia History of American Television tracks the growth of TV into a convergent technology, a global industry, a social catalyst, a viable art form, and a complex and dynamic reflection of the American mind and character. Renowned media historian Gary R. Edgerton follows the technological progress and increasing cultural relevance of television from its prehistory (before 1947) to the Network Era (1948-1975) and the Cable Era (1976-1994). He considers the remodeling of television's look and purpose during World War II; the gender, racial, and ethnic components of its early broadcasts and audiences; its transformation of postwar America; and its function in the political life of the country. In conclusion, Edgerton takes a discerning look at our current Digital Era and the new forms of instantaneous communication that continue to change America's social, political, and economic landscape.
Re-viewing Television History
Author: Helen Wheatley
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 1845111885
Pages: 245
Year: 2007-12-15
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This title is a reassessment of both current methods and practices in television historiography and of assumptions and critical commonplaces about television history itself. It focuses on debates about the canon, on texts, production and institutions, viewers and the interconnections between these areas.
Television
Author: Francis Wheen, Peter Fiddick
Publisher: Century
ISBN:
Pages: 252
Year: 1985
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Arts TV
Author: John Albert Walker
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0861964357
Pages: 245
Year: 1993
View: 560
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"From Monitor to The Late Show, British television programs featuring the visual arts are profiled here. The various types or genres of arts programs are identified, including review programs, strand series, drama-documentaries, and artists profiles, and a chronological account of their evolution from 1936 to the 1990s is provided. Major series such as Civilization, Ways of Seeing, Shock of the New, State of the Art, and Relative Values are examined in detail."
A European Television History
Author: Jonathan Bignell, Andreas Fickers
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN: 1405163402
Pages: 288
Year: 2008-12-15
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European Television History brings together television historians and media scholars to chart the development of television in Europe since its inception. The volume interrogates the history of the medium in divergent political, economic, cultural and ideological national contexts Taking a comparative approach to the topic, the volume is organized around a set of common questions, themes, and methodological reflections Deals with European television in the context of television historiography and transnational traditions Case study chapters written by scholars from different European countries to reflect their specific areas of expertise
The History of Television, 1942 to 2000
Author: Albert Abramson
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786412208
Pages: 309
Year: 2003
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Albert Abramson published (with McFarland) in 1987 a landmark volume titled The History of Television, 1880-1941 (massive...research--Library Journal; voluminous documentation--Choice; many striking old photos--The TV Collector). At last he has produced the follow-up volume; the reader may be assured there is no other book in any language that is remotely comparable to it. Together, these two volumes provide the definitive technical history of the medium. Upon the development in the mid-1940s of new cameras and picture tubes that made commercial television possible worldwide, the medium rose rapidly to prominence. Perhaps even more important was the invention of the video tape recorder in 1956, allowing editing, re-shooting and rebroadcasting. This second volume, 1942 to 2000 covers these significant developments and much more. Chapters are devoted to television during World War II and the postwar era, the development of color television, Ampex Corporation's contributions, television in Europe, the change from helical to high band technology, solid state cameras, the television coverage of Apollo II, the rise of electronic journalism, television entering the studios, the introduction of the camcorder, the demise of RCA at the hands of GE, the domination of Sony and Matsushita, and the future of television in e-cinema and the 1080 P24 format. The book is heavily illustrated (as is the first volume).
Honolulu Television
Author: A.J. McWhorter
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1467127582
Pages: 128
Year: 2017-12
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Honolulu Television celebrates 65 years of local broadcasting in the islands. Test patterns first appeared on local station KONA, and soon after, KGMB broadcast Carl "Kini Popo" Hebenstreit's first words on air on December 1, 1952. Honolulu has had a wealth of colorful personalities grace its airwaves. Sheriff Ken, Lucky Luck, Chubby Roland, Captain Honolulu, and Checkers & Pogo are just some of the names and shows that entertained island viewers back in the day, when there were few choices on the dial. Some Honolulu television personalities would get their start here and move on to national and network television stardom, like famed sports broadcaster Al Michaels; Ken Kashiwahara, the last journalist remaining on scene at the Fall of Saigon; and Doug Bruckner, a longtime correspondent for Hard Copy, A Current Affair, and Extra syndicated entertainment and television news magazine shows.
Television, History, and American Culture
Author: Mary Beth Haralovich, Lauren Rabinovitz
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 082232394X
Pages: 222
Year: 1999
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A collection of essays exemplifying feminist approaches to television history.
Transnational Television History
Author: Andreas Fickers, Catherine Johnson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113576039X
Pages: 184
Year: 2013-09-13
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Although television has developed into a major agent of the transnational and global flow of information and entertainment, television historiography and scholarship largely remains a national endeavour, partly due to the fact that television has been understood as a tool for the creation of national identity. But the breaking of the quasi-monopoly of public service broadcasters all over Europe in the 1980s has changed the television landscape, and cross-border television channels - with the help of satellite and the Internet - have catapulted the relatively closed television nations into the universe of globalized media channels. At least, this is the picture painted by the popular meta-narratives of European television history. Transnational Television History asks us to re-evaluate the function of television as a medium of nation-building in its formative years and to reassess the historical narrative that insists that European television only became transnational with the emergence of more commercial services and new technologies from the 1980s. It also questions some common assumptions in television historiography by offering some alternative perspectives on the complex processes of transnational circulation of television technology, professionals, programmes and aesthetics. This book was originally published as a special issue of Media History.

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