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Sidon Through the Ages
Author: Nina Jidejian
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 349
Year: 2006
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Sidon, through the ages
Author: Nina Jidejian
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 287
Year: 1971
View: 610
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Isaiah Through the Ages
Author: Johanna Manley
Publisher: St Vladimir's Seminary Press
ISBN: 0962253634
Pages: 1072
Year: 1995
View: 1064
Read: 228
A compilation of previously unavailable translated commentaries by the Church Fathers on the book of Isaiah. Fourth and fifth-century exegetes are featured especially, but there are many excerpts from Sts. Justin Maryr, Irenaeus, Athanasius of Alexandria, Jerome, Ambrose and others. Modern commentary (from 1775 to the present) has been added to enhance our understanding by providing insight into the historical context, poetry and structure. In some chapters, a short Judaic section has been included to point to Messianic passages and assist with some obscure metaphors and references.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
Author: Geoffrey W. Bromiley
Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing
ISBN: 0802837840
Pages: 1230
Year: 1995-01
View: 514
Read: 522
Presents thousands of alphabetized entries on topics and terms related to the Bible and its study, providing biblical references and cross-references, and includes hundreds of drawings, photos, and maps. This volume covers A-D.
Jesus and His World
Author: John J. Rousseau
Publisher: Fortress Press
ISBN: 1451411367
Pages: 392
Year: 1995
View: 163
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Designed for teachers, students, and general readers, this book offers reliable and up-to-date information about important sites, persons, customs, and other facts of life that are important for understanding Jesus and his cultural setting. The 108 entries are arranged alphabetically for easy reference. Also includes tables, charts, glossary, bibliography, indexes, and more.
Journeys on the Silk Road Through Ages—Romance, Legend, Reality
Author: Avijeet Bhattacharya
Publisher: Zorba Books
ISBN: 9386407817
Pages: 250
Year: 2017-10-11
View: 1331
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Journeys on the Silk Road Through Ages—Romance, Legend, Reality is a compelling narrative about the legendary Silk Road, down the ages. It takes us back to the nearly forgotten times when the dusty, long road was discovered by herders and nomads in search of pastures and oases. It was a long trek into the unknown. This gradually turned into the fabled ‘Silk Road’ spanning from China and across Central Asia, with its numerous trade routes, staging posts, caravanserais on the one hand, and the rugged landscape through steppes, across mountains, deserts and nations on the other. The Silk Road stood out like a great artery, that sustained for centuries. The Road with its routes conveyed not only commerce but also ideas and philosophy of the far-east China to the far-flung Roman Empire in the west, drawing from and contributing to other regions and countries that fell along the way – Turkestan, Afghanistan, India, Persia, Mesopotamia, Palestine, Phoenicia and Anatolia, thus, linking the ancient and the medieval worlds. It was an enterprise of gigantic proportions; the great highway witnessed trade in almost all products, with silk, precious stones, porcelain, metals, and horses as chief commodities. Of these, silk was the foremost merchandise that merchants transported on camel caravans and upon mules from the Land of Serica. Slaves too were traded. Monks and warriors also walked along the trodden path. Merchants exchanged goods which made trade possible bringing in a flow of wealth, while monks and warriors exchanged philosophy, ideas, and statecraft, despite conflicts and wars. The narrative travels back to the times when the road started making history by joining imperial Xi’an with imperial Rome – a distance of more than 8,000kms – during the period of China’s Han Dynasty, sometime around 200 BC. This strangely endured till the present days of Communist China and OBOR, deliberating the Chinese Puzzle. The book is an adventurous amalgamation of history, travel and the unanticipated, and not merely a clichéd travel account. It presents a fascinating story of realms, rulers, travellers and merchants, both ancient and modern, with captivating collection of anecdotes, lores and current realities, from far and wide. Its brilliant web makes the book immensely readable.
The Ages of Homer
Author: Jane B. Carter, Sarah P. Morris
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292712081
Pages: 564
Year: 1998-04
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"This is the most exciting and diverse collection of essays on Homer to emerge in the past twenty-five years.... There is no other volume like this in scope or ambition or in the erudition of its contributors. It is one of a kind." —Richard P. Martin, Professor of Classics, Princeton University "Dedicated to the...archaeologist and classical scholar Emily Vermeule, this splendidly illustrated volume takes a special place among the numerous studies devoted to the Homeric past.... To sum it up, this is a valuable collection of penetrating studies about Homer, with interesting insights into early Greek art." —Journal of Indo-European Studies "By any standard an outstanding [collection], and among its thirty-one articles are nearly a dozen that will be appreciated as real advances in the discussion of one Homeric problema or another—perhaps an unprecedented percentage.... The University of Texas Press has produced a volume worthy of its ceremonial function in the career of a tremendously influential scholar and educator. It is lavish, and very attractive." —Bryn Mawr Classical Review "Will be required reading for serious students of the Iliad, the Odyssey, and the Homeric world." —Choice Homer's Iliad and Odyssey have fascinated listeners and readers for over twenty-five centuries. In this volume of original essays, collected to honor the distinguished career of Emily T. Vermeule, thirty-four leading experts in Homeric studies and related fields provide up-to-date, multidisciplinary accounts of the most current issues in the study of Homer. The book is divided into three sections. The first section treats the Bronze Age setting of the poems (around 1200 B.C.), using archaeological evidence to reveal how poetic memory preserves, distorts, and invents the past. The second section explores the early Iron Age, in which the poems were written (c. 800-500 B.C.), using the strategies of comparative philology and mythology, literary theory, historical linguistics, anthropology, and iconography to determine how the poems took shape. The final section traces the use of Homer for literary and artistic inspiration by classical Greece and Rome.
Was Achilles a Jew?
Author: Larry S. Milner
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 1465333150
Pages: 519
Year: 2008-01-14
View: 1191
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Significant interest has always existed about the origin of Classic Greek culture, but despite the long-standing attention, scholars continue to disagree on where this amazing civilization got its start. The Mycenaeans were the earliest Greek-speaking people on the mainland, but the country entered a Dark Age following the end of the Trojan War, and in the Archaic Age which followed, the fundamentals of Greek political and literary thought suddenly emerged, without a clear source of derivation. Historians have sometimes given credit to the Egyptians, Phoenicians, or other Eastern civilizations for this evolution, but no serious consideration has been given to the ancient Hebrews, despite the fact that the Exodus from Egypt took place during the Late Bronze Age, when Mycenae was at its peak of influence in the Mediterranean Basin. In Was Achilles a Jew? Hebraic Origins to Greek Civilization, Dr. Larry Milner argues that a group of Hebrews devoted to the traditions of the patriarchs left the Exodus following the parricidal reprisals instituted by Moses during the modification of Judaism into a monotheistic faith, and migrated to Mycenae, where they became immersed into Mycenaean culture, taking part in the Trojan War. His analysis provides the most persuasive argument to date about where the Eastern influence in Greece was generated.
The Legacy of Iranian Imperialism and the Individual
Author: John Pairman Brown
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter
ISBN: 3110882396
Pages: 580
Year: 2001-01-01
View: 1329
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The series Beihefte zur Zeitschrift für die alttestamentliche Wissenschaft (BZAW) covers all areas of research into the Old Testament, focusing on the Hebrew Bible, its early and later forms in Ancient Judaism, as well as its branching into many neighboring cultures of the Ancient Near East and the Greco-Roman world.
Sidon
Author: Frederick Carl Eiselen
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 172
Year: 1907
View: 648
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Tyre, Byblos, and Sidon
Author: Charles River Charles River Editors
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 1541159039
Pages: 138
Year: 2016-12-17
View: 214
Read: 1074
*Includes pictures *Includes ancient accounts describing the cities *Includes a bibliography for further reading Of all the peoples of the ancient Near East, the Phoenicians are among the most recognizable but also perhaps the least understood. The Phoenicians never built an empire like the Egyptians and Assyrians; in fact, the Phoenicians never created a unified Phoenician state but instead existed as independent city-state kingdoms scattered throughout the Mediterranean region. However, despite the fact there was never a "Phoenician Empire," the Phoenicians proved to be more prolific in their exploration and colonization than any other peoples in world history until the Spanish during the Age of Discovery. The Phoenicians were well-known across different civilizations throughout the ancient world, and their influence can be felt across much of the West today because they are credited with inventing the forerunner to the Greek alphabet, from which the Latin alphabet was directly derived. Nonetheless, the Phoenicians left behind few written texts, so modern historians have been forced to reconstruct their past through a variety of ancient Egyptians, Assyrian, Babylonian, Greek, and Roman sources. It's not even clear what the Phoenicians called themselves, because the name "Phoenician" is derived from the Greek word "phoinix," which possibly relates to the dyes they produced and traded (Markoe 2000, 10). The mystery of the ancient Phoenicians is further compounded by the fact that archaeologists have only been able to excavate small sections of the three primary Phoenician cities: Byblos, Sidon, and Tyre. A network of this size, with hundreds of colonies and thousands of ships, had to be well-coordinated, and it was thanks to important cities along the Mediterranean coast. One of the most crucial cities in the system was hidden beneath the Greek, Roman, and Crusader ruins of Lebanon: the ancient city of Tyre. "Seated at entrance to the sea," according to the prophet Ezekiel, Tyre was constructed on a purportedly impenetrable island. As one of the oldest cities in the world, Byblos is a fascinating place, with its successive layers of debris representing millennia of human occupation. From the earliest times this coastal strip played a key role in connecting Arabia, Anatolia, Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Aegean. Because of this, the history of the city cannot be told in isolation of its neighbors. From the Bronze Age Byblos had a special connection with Egypt, which ceased only with the invasion of the mysterious Sea Peoples at the end of the 2nd millennium BCE. Between the Phoenicians, Asia Minor, Israel, and Roman Palestine, it is not surprising that many divergent religions have and continue to exist in the region. The history of Sidon, as with other Phoenician cities, constantly fluctuated between freedom and subjection. Its privileged, geographical position on the coast was the source of its commercial development and its openness to foreign cultures, but in doing so the prosperous city became coveted by numerous conquerors. It passed through the successive influence of Egypt, the neighboring Phoenician city-state of Tyre, and eventually flourished under Persian rule as the seat of a satrap for the whole Euphrates region. The Persian king frequently made use of the renowned Sidonian fleet during his military campaigns, and the kings of Sidon were greatly rewarded for their services. However, during the campaigns of Alexander the Great, Sidon opened its doors to the young Macedonian, who chose to depose the long lasting dynasty of Sidonian kings. It later became the battleground between the Arab caliphates and European Crusaders during the Middle Ages in a conflict that in many ways continues to shape the region to this day.
A History of the Inquisition of the Middle Ages
Author: Henry Charles Lea
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages:
Year: 1888
View: 1090
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The coasts of Tyre and Sidon
Author: Solomon Caesar Malan
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 87
Year: 1858
View: 856
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Sidon
Author: Charles River Charles River Editors
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 1541157869
Pages: 62
Year: 2016-12-17
View: 1124
Read: 428
*Includes pictures *Includes ancient accounts of Sidon *Includes a bibliography for further reading Of all the peoples of the ancient Near East, the Phoenicians are among the most recognizable but also perhaps the least understood. The Phoenicians never built an empire like the Egyptians and Assyrians; in fact, the Phoenicians never created a unified Phoenician state but instead existed as independent city-state kingdoms scattered throughout the Mediterranean region. However, despite the fact there was never a "Phoenician Empire," the Phoenicians proved to be more prolific in their exploration and colonization than any other peoples in world history until the Spanish during the Age of Discovery. The Phoenicians were well-known across different civilizations throughout the ancient world, and their influence can be felt across much of the West today because they are credited with inventing the forerunner to the Greek alphabet, from which the Latin alphabet was directly derived. Nonetheless, the Phoenicians left behind few written texts, so modern historians have been forced to reconstruct their past through a variety of ancient Egyptians, Assyrian, Babylonian, Greek, and Roman sources. It's not even clear what the Phoenicians called themselves, because the name "Phoenician" is derived from the Greek word "phoinix," which possibly relates to the dyes they produced and traded (Markoe 2000, 10). The mystery of the ancient Phoenicians is further compounded by the fact that archaeologists have only been able to excavate small sections of the three primary Phoenician cities: Byblos, Sidon, and Tyre. For centuries, the port city of Sidon served as the capital of the Phoenician homeland, the administrative center of their maritime trading network, and the holy center of one of the most popular Levantine religious cults. Located in southern Phoenicia about 30 miles south of the present-day Lebanese capital of Beirut, the settlement has a narrative that stretches far into the depths of prehistory. The oldest archaeological remains date from the second half of the 4th millennium BCE. The history of Sidon, as with other Phoenician cities, constantly fluctuated between freedom and subjection. Its privileged geographical position on the coast was the source of its commercial development and its openness to foreign cultures, but in doing so the prosperous city became coveted by numerous conquerors. It passed through the successive influence of Egypt, the neighboring Phoenician city-state of Tyre, and eventually flourished under Persian rule as the seat of a satrap for the whole Euphrates region. The Persian king frequently made use of the renowned Sidonian fleet during his military campaigns, and the kings of Sidon were greatly rewarded for their services. During the campaigns of Alexander the Great, Sidon opened its doors to the young Macedonian, who chose to depose the long lasting dynasty of Sidonian kings. It later became the battleground between the Arab caliphates and European Crusaders during the Middle Ages in a conflict that in many ways continues to shape the region to this day. Like many other cities in the Levant, Sidon has been continuously inhabited over the centuries, and despite the transformations brought by multiple civilizations that succeeded the Phoenicians, the city maintained a thoroughly ancient identity and original character into the modern period. Nonetheless, much of its ancient history remains shrouded in mystery, not only by a lack of systematic archaeological excavation but also because much of its heritage has been lost through conflict and looting by treasure hunters throughout the 19th and 20th centuries. To this day a great amount of Sidon's archaeological assets are the property of foreign museum collections.
A Dissertation Upon the Phoenician Numeral Characters Antiently Used at Sidon
Author: John Swinton
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 9
Year: 1758
View: 1147
Read: 859

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