Sachiko A Nagasaki Bomb Survivors Story Nonfiction Young Adult Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Sachiko
Author: Caren Stelson
Publisher: Carolrhoda Books
ISBN: 1467789038
Pages: 120
Year: 2016-10-01
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This striking work of narrative nonfiction tells the true story of six-year-old Sachiko Yasui's survival of the Nagasaki atomic bomb on August 9, 1945 and the heartbreaking and lifelong aftermath. Having conducted extensive interviews with Sachiko Yasui, Caren Stelson shares the true story of a young girl who survived the atomic bomb and chronicles her long journey to find peace. This special book offers readers a remarkable new perspective on the final moments of World War II and their aftermath.
The War That Saved My Life
Author: Kimberly Brubaker Bradley
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0147510481
Pages: 336
Year: 2016-05-31
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A young disabled girl and her brother are evacuated from London to the English countryside during World War II, where they find life to be much sweeter away from their abusive mother.
Denied, Detained, Deported
Author: Ann Bausum
Publisher: National Geographic Books
ISBN: 1426303327
Pages: 111
Year: 2009
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An award-winning author examines the history of American immigration--a critical topic in 21st century America--particularly those lesser-known stories of immigrants who were denied entrance into the States or detained for security reasons.
Nagasaki
Author: Susan Southard
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0698195558
Pages: 416
Year: 2015-07-28
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“[A] reminder of just how horrible nuclear weapons are.”—The Wall Street Journal “A devastating read that highlights man’s capacity to wreak destruction, but in which one also catches a glimpse of all that is best about people.”—San Francisco Chronicle “A poignant and complex picture of the second atomic bomb’s enduring physical and psychological tolls. Eyewitness accounts are visceral and haunting. . . . But the book’s biggest achievement is its treatment of the aftershocks in the decades since 1945.” —The New Yorker The enduring impact of a nuclear bomb, told through the stories of those who survived: necessary reading as the threat of nuclear war emerges again. On August 9, 1945, three days after the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, the United States dropped a second atomic bomb on Nagasaki, a small port city on Japan’s southernmost island. An estimated 74,000 people died within the first five months, and another 75,000 were injured. Nagasaki takes readers from the morning of the bombing to the city today, telling the first-hand experiences of five survivors, all of whom were teenagers at the time of the devastation. Susan Southard has spent years interviewing hibakusha (“bomb-affected people”) and researching the physical, emotional, and social challenges of post-atomic life. She weaves together dramatic eyewitness accounts with searing analysis of the policies of censorship and denial that colored much of what was reported about the bombing both in the United States and Japan. A gripping narrative of human resilience, Nagasaki will help shape public discussion and debate over one of the most controversial wartime acts in history. WINNER of the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize FINALIST for the Ridenhour Book Prize • Chautauqua Prize • William Saroyan International Prize for Writing • PEN Center USA Literary Award NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The Economist • The Washington Post • American Library Association • Kirkus Reviews
Bomb
Author: Steve Sheinkin
Publisher: Flash Point
ISBN: 1596438614
Pages: 272
Year: 2012-09-04
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In December of 1938, a chemist in a German laboratory made a shocking discovery: When placed next to radioactive material, a Uranium atom split in two. That simple discovery launched a scientific race that spanned 3 continents. In Great Britain and the United States, Soviet spies worked their way into the scientific community; in Norway, a commando force slipped behind enemy lines to attack German heavy-water manufacturing; and deep in the desert, one brilliant group of scientists was hidden away at a remote site at Los Alamos. This is the story of the plotting, the risk-taking, the deceit, and genius that created the world's most formidable weapon. This is the story of the atomic bomb. Bomb is a 2012 National Book Awards finalist for Young People's Literature. Bomb is a 2012 Washington Post Best Kids Books of the Year title. Bomb is a 2013 Newbery Honor book.
A Pale View of Hills
Author: Kazuo Ishiguro
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307829073
Pages: 192
Year: 2012-09-05
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From the winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature and author of the Booker Prize–winning novel The Remains of the Day, here is the story of Etsuko, a Japanese woman now living alone in England, dwelling on the recent suicide of her daughter. In a novel where past and present confuse, she relives scenes of Japan's devastation in the wake of World War II.
A Song for Nagasaki
Author: Paul Glynn
Publisher: Eerdmans Publishing Company
ISBN: 0802804764
Pages: 267
Year: 1988
View: 282
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The story of Takashi Nagai, M.D., professor of radiology at the University of Nagasaki, and of his spiritual pilgrimge from his native Shintoism to atheistic rationalism, and finally to a Christian faith.
Every Falling Star
Author: Sungju Lee, Susan Elizabeth McClelland
Publisher: Abrams
ISBN: 161312340X
Pages: 344
Year: 2016-09-13
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Every Falling Star, the first book to portray contemporary North Korea to a young audience, is the intense memoir of a North Korean boy named Sungju who is forced at age twelve to live on the streets and fend for himself. To survive, Sungju creates a gang and lives by thieving, fighting, begging, and stealing rides on cargo trains. Sungju richly re-creates his scabrous story, depicting what it was like for a boy alone to create a new family with his gang, his “brothersâ€?; to be hungry and to fear arrest, imprisonment, and even execution. This riveting memoir allows young readers to learn about other cultures where freedoms they take for granted do not exist.
Black Potatoes
Author: Susan Campbell Bartoletti
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0547530854
Pages: 192
Year: 2014-07-29
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In 1845, a disaster struck Ireland. Overnight, a mysterious blight attacked the potato crops, turning the potatoes black and destroying the only real food of nearly six million people. Over the next five years, the blight attacked again and again. These years are known today as the Great Irish Famine, a time when one million people died from starvation and disease and two million more fled their homeland. Black Potatoes is the compelling story of men, women, and children who defied landlords and searched empty fields for scraps of harvested vegetables and edible weeds to eat, who walked several miles each day to hard-labor jobs for meager wages and to reach soup kitchens, and who committed crimes just to be sent to jail, where they were assured of a meal. It’s the story of children and adults who suffered from starvation, disease, and the loss of family and friends, as well as those who died. Illustrated with black and white engravings, it’s also the story of the heroes among the Irish people and how they held on to hope.
We Will Not Be Silent
Author: Russell Freedman
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0544826582
Pages: 112
Year: 2016-09-06
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The dramatic, disturbing story of the small group of university students who dared to distribute leaflets condemning Hitler and his policies. Several paid with their lives. It's also an inspiring story of the profound effect young people can create on a nation's history by taking action based on their fervent beliefs.
The Orbis Pictus of John Amos Comenius
Author: Johann Amos Comenius
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 194
Year: 1887
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The Last Cherry Blossom
Author: Kathleen Burkinshaw
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
ISBN: 1634506944
Pages: 240
Year: 2016-08-02
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Following the seventieth anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, this is a new, very personal story to join Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes. Yuriko was happy growing up in Hiroshima when it was just her and Papa. But her aunt Kimiko and her cousin Genji are living with them now, and the family is only getting bigger with talk of a double marriage! And while things are changing at home, the world beyond their doors is even more unpredictable. World War II is coming to an end, and since the Japanese newspapers don’t report lost battles, the Japanese people are not entirely certain of where Japan stands. Yuriko is used to the sirens and the air-raid drills, but things start to feel more real when the neighbors who have left to fight stop coming home. When the bombs hit Hiroshima, it’s through Yuriko’s twelve-year-old eyes that we witness the devastation and horror. This is a story that offers young readers insight into how children lived during the war, while also introducing them to Japanese culture. Based loosely on author Kathleen Burkinshaw’s mother’s firsthand experience surviving the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, The Last Cherry Blossom hopes to warn readers of the immense damage nuclear war can bring, while reminding them that the “enemy” in any war is often not so different from ourselves.
Leaving Glorytown
Author: Eduardo F. Calcines
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR)
ISBN: 1429948310
Pages: 240
Year: 2009-03-31
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Eduardo F. Calcines was a child of Fidel Castro's Cuba; he was just three years old when Castro came to power in January 1959. After that, everything changed for his family and his country. When he was ten, his family applied for an exit visa to emigrate to America and he was ridiculed by his schoolmates and even his teachers for being a traitor to his country. But even worse, his father was sent to an agricultural reform camp to do hard labor as punishment for daring to want to leave Cuba. During the years to come, as he grew up in Glorytown, a neighborhood in the city of Cienfuegos, Eduardo hoped with all his might that their exit visa would be granted before he turned fifteen, the age at which he would be drafted into the army. In this absorbing memoir, by turns humorous and heartbreaking, Eduardo Calcines recounts his boyhood and chronicles the conditions that led him to wish above all else to leave behind his beloved extended family and his home for a chance at a better future.
The tooth race
Author: Caren Stelson
Publisher:
ISBN: 0395903017
Pages: 16
Year: 1999
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Tom and Tim are friends who love to race. Both have a loose tooth. Both want to be the first to loose his tooth. A race to see who does.
Touching Spirit Bear
Author: Ben Mikaelsen
Publisher:
ISBN: 0786263512
Pages: 308
Year: 2004-02-01
View: 803
Read: 698
Winner of the Nautilus AwardInterest Level: Middle/High SchoolReading Grade Level: 3rd & 4thLexile Level: Not AvailableTheme: Emotions/Growing Up

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