Revolution On The Hudson New York City And The Hudson River Valley In The American War Of Independence Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Revolution on the Hudson: New York City and the Hudson River Valley in the American War of Independence
Author: George C. Daughan
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 039324573X
Pages: 432
Year: 2016-06-13
View: 1094
Read: 186
The untold story of the fight for the Hudson River Valley, control of which, both the Americans and the British firmly believed, would determine the outcome of the Revolutionary War. No part of the country was more contested during the American Revolution than New York City, the Hudson River, and the surrounding counties. Political and military leaders on both sides viewed the Hudson River Valley as the American jugular, which, if cut, would quickly bleed the rebellion to death. So in 1776, King George III sent the largest amphibious force ever assembled to seize Manhattan and use it as a base from which to push up the Hudson River Valley for a grand rendezvous at Albany with an impressive army driving down from Canada. George Washington and every other patriot leader shared the king’s fixation with the Hudson. Generations of American and British historians have held the same view. In fact, one of the few things that scholars have agreed upon is that the British strategy, though disastrously executed, should have been swift and effective. Until now, no one has argued that this plan of action was lunacy from the beginning. Revolution on the Hudson makes the bold new argument that Britain’s attempt to cut off New England never would have worked, and that doggedly pursuing dominance of the Hudson ultimately cost the crown her colonies. It unpacks intricate military maneuvers on land and sea, introduces the personalities presiding over each side’s strategy, and reinterprets the vagaries of colonial politics to offer a thrilling response to one of our most vexing historical questions: How could a fledgling nation have defeated the most powerful war machine of the era? George C. Daughan—winner of the prestigious Samuel Eliot Morrison Award for Naval Literature—integrates the war’s naval elements with its political, military, economic, and social dimensions to create a major new study of the American Revolution. Revolution on the Hudson offers a much clearer understanding of our founding conflict, and how it transformed a rebellion that Britain should have crushed into a war they could never win.
Revolution on the Hudson
Author: George C. Daughan
Publisher: W. W. Norton
ISBN: 0393354148
Pages: 432
Year: 2017-06-06
View: 459
Read: 966
The untold story of the fight for the Hudson River Valley, control of which, both the Americans and the British firmly believed, would determine the outcome of the Revolutionary War.
Key to the Northern Country
Author: James M. Johnson , Christopher Pryslopski, Andrew Villani
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 1438448139
Pages: 328
Year: 2013-08-01
View: 1011
Read: 697
Offers nearly forty years of interdisciplinary scholarship on the Hudson River Valley’s role in the American Revolution. The Hudson River Valley, which George Washington referred to as the “Key to the Northern Country,” played a central role in the American Revolution. From 1776 to 1780, with major battles fought at Saratoga, Fort Montgomery, and Stony Point, the region was a central battleground of the Revolution. In addition, it witnessed some of the most dramatic and memorable aspects of the war, such as Benedict Arnold’s failed conspiracy at West Point, the burning of New York’s capital at Kingston, and the more than six-hundred-mile march of Washington and the Continental Army and Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, and his French Expeditionary Corps to Yorktown, Virginia. Compiled from essays that appeared in the Hudson Valley Regional Review and the Hudson River Valley Review, published by the Hudson River Valley Institute, the book illustrates the richly textured history of this supremely important time and place.
George Washington's Westchester Gamble
Author: Richard Borkow
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1625842139
Pages: 192
Year: 2011-05-31
View: 1183
Read: 333
During the summer of 1781, the armies of Generals Washington and Rochambeau were encamped in lower Westchester County at Dobbs Ferry, Ardsley, Hartsdale, Edgemont and White Plains. It was a time of military deadlock and grim prospects for the allied Americans and French. Washington recognized that a decisive victory was needed or America would never achieve independence. In August, he marched these soldiers to Virginia to face General Cornwallis and his redcoats. Washington risked all on this march. Its success required secrecy, and he prepared an elaborate deception to convince the British that Manhattan, not Virginia, was the target of the allied armies. Local historian Richard Borkow presents this exciting story of the Westchester encampment and Washingtons great gamble that saved the United States.
Lexington and Concord: The Battle Heard Round the World
Author: George C. Daughan
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393245756
Pages: 384
Year: 2018-04-03
View: 1246
Read: 504
An award-winning historian reinterprets the battle that launched the American Revolution. George C. Daughan’s magnificently detailed account of the Battle of Lexington and Concord challenges the prevailing narrative of the American War of Independence. It was, Daughan argues, based as much in economic concerns as political ones. When Massachusetts militiamen turned out in overwhelming numbers to fight the British, they believed they were fighting for their farms and livelihoods, as well as for liberty. Benjamin Franklin was not surprised by this widespread belief. In the years prior to the Revolution, Franklin had toured Great Britain and witnessed the wretched living conditions of the king’s subjects. They wore rags for clothes, went barefoot, and had little to eat. They were not citizens, but serfs. Franklin described the appalling situation in a number of letters home. In the eyes of many American colonists, Britain’s repressive measures were not seen simply as an effort to reestablish political control of the colonies, but also as a means to reduce the prosperous colonists themselves to the serfdom described in the Franklin letters. Another key factor in the outcome of this historic battle, according to Daughan, was the scorn British officers had for colonial fighters. Although the British officers had fought alongside colonial Americans in the ferocious French and Indian War, they failed to anticipate the skill, organization, and sheer numbers of the colonial militias. Daughan explains how British arrogance led them to defeat at the hands of motivated, experienced patriot fighters determined to protect their way of life. Authoritative and immersive, Lexington and Concord gives us a new understanding of a battle that became a template for colonial uprisings in later centuries.
City of Sedition
Author: John Strausbaugh
Publisher: Twelve
ISBN: 1455584193
Pages: 352
Year: 2016-08-02
View: 1210
Read: 1329
WINNER OF THE FLETCHER PRATT AWARD FOR BEST NON-FICTION BOOK OF 2016 In a single definitive narrative, CITY OF SEDITION tells the spellbinding story of the huge-and hugely conflicted-role New York City played in the Civil War. No city was more of a help to Abraham Lincoln and the Union war effort, or more of a hindrance. No city raised more men, money, and materiel for the war, and no city raised more hell against it. It was a city of patriots, war heroes, and abolitionists, but simultaneously a city of antiwar protest, draft resistance, and sedition. Without his New York supporters, it's highly unlikely Lincoln would have made it to the White House. Yet, because of the city's vital and intimate business ties to the Cotton South, the majority of New Yorkers never voted for him and were openly hostile to him and his politics. Throughout the war New York City was a nest of antiwar "Copperheads" and a haven for deserters and draft dodgers. New Yorkers would react to Lincoln's wartime policies with the deadliest rioting in American history. The city's political leaders would create a bureaucracy solely devoted to helping New Yorkers evade service in Lincoln's army. Rampant war profiteering would create an entirely new class of New York millionaires, the "shoddy aristocracy." New York newspapers would be among the most vilely racist and vehemently antiwar in the country. Some editors would call on their readers to revolt and commit treason; a few New Yorkers would answer that call. They would assist Confederate terrorists in an attempt to burn their own city down, and collude with Lincoln's assassin. Here in CITY OF SEDITION, a gallery of fascinating New Yorkers comes to life, the likes of Horace Greeley, Walt Whitman, Julia Ward Howe, Boss Tweed, Thomas Nast, Matthew Brady, and Herman Melville. This book follows the fortunes of these figures and chronicles how many New Yorkers seized the opportunities the conflict presented to amass capital, create new industries, and expand their markets, laying the foundation for the city's-and the nation's-growth.
Other New York, The
Author: Joseph S. Tiedemann
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 0791483681
Pages: 258
Year: 2012-02-01
View: 1144
Read: 534
Essays exploring rural New York during the American Revolution.
Saratoga
Author: Richard M. Ketchum
Publisher: Henry Holt and Company
ISBN: 1466879521
Pages: 545
Year: 2014-08-26
View: 622
Read: 677
In the summer of 1777 (twelve months after the Declaration of Indepence) the British launched an invasion from Canada under General John Burgoyne. It was the campaign that was supposed to the rebellion, but it resulted in a series of battles that changed America's history and that of the world. Stirring narrative history, skillfully told through the perspective of those who fought in the campaign, Saratoga brings to life as never before the inspiring story of Americans who did their utmost in what seemed a lost cause, achieving what proved to be the crucial victory of the Revolution. A New York Times Notable Book, 1997 Winner of the Fraunces Tavern Museum Award, 1997
Chaining the Hudson
Author: Lincoln Diamant
Publisher: Fordham Univ Press
ISBN: 0823223396
Pages: 233
Year: 2004
View: 484
Read: 270
Much of the Revolutionary War took was fought along the Hudson River-which for five years was successfully blockaded by American forces by means of a massive chain across the river at West Point. Here is this important story, vividly and dramatically told, from logs, diaries, letters, and with many rare illustrations.In an almost magical sense the reader is drawn back to the time when the country drew its first breath.-The New York TimesBrings to life an extraordinary chapter of the Revolution.-Washington Post[The] best account to date of the Revolutionary War activity in the Valley.-Hudson Valley Regional ReviewMeticulously researched. Reads like good historical fiction.-American History
Washington's Spies
Author: Alexander Rose
Publisher: Bantam
ISBN: 0307418707
Pages: 384
Year: 2007-12-18
View: 544
Read: 563
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • Turn: Washington’s Spies, now an original series on AMC Based on remarkable new research, acclaimed historian Alexander Rose brings to life the true story of the spy ring that helped America win the Revolutionary War. For the first time, Rose takes us beyond the battlefront and deep into the shadowy underworld of double agents and triple crosses, covert operations and code breaking, and unmasks the courageous, flawed men who inhabited this wilderness of mirrors—including the spymaster at the heart of it all. In the summer of 1778, with the war poised to turn in his favor, General George Washington desperately needed to know where the British would strike next. To that end, he unleashed his secret weapon: an unlikely ring of spies in New York charged with discovering the enemy’s battle plans and military strategy. Washington’s small band included a young Quaker torn between political principle and family loyalty, a swashbuckling sailor addicted to the perils of espionage, a hard-drinking barkeep, a Yale-educated cavalryman and friend of the doomed Nathan Hale, and a peaceful, sickly farmer who begged Washington to let him retire but who always came through in the end. Personally guiding these imperfect everyday heroes was Washington himself. In an era when officers were gentlemen, and gentlemen didn’ t spy, he possessed an extraordinary talent for deception—and proved an adept spymaster. The men he mentored were dubbed the Culper Ring. The British secret service tried to hunt them down, but they escaped by the closest of shaves thanks to their ciphers, dead drops, and invisible ink. Rose’s thrilling narrative tells the unknown story of the Revolution–the murderous intelligence war, gunrunning and kidnapping, defectors and executioners—that has never appeared in the history books. But Washington’s Spies is also a spirited, touching account of friendship and trust, fear and betrayal, amid the dark and silent world of the spy. From the Hardcover edition.
Battle Of Brooklyn 1776
Author: John J. Gallagher, J Gallagher
Publisher: Da Capo Press
ISBN: 0786751320
Pages: 222
Year: 2009-08-05
View: 1227
Read: 1095
This popular 1995 work is now available in trade paperback for all those who have still not read a vivid, exciting account of the largest battle of the American Revolution (albeit a crushing American defeat) and for all those who continue to refer to the clash as “The Battle of Long Island.” At Brooklyn, George Washington commanded the largest army that he would handle throughout the Revolution, and though he did not at first succeed, the fighting that day set the stage for victories to come. “In his shot-by-shot account of the largest and bloodiest battle of the American Revolution, Gallagher recreates the fierce encounter of 27 August 1776 in which twenty thousand British, Hessian and Loyalist troops defeated ten thousand patriot soldiers. . . . the book offers many perceptive observations and the author succinctly summarizes the lessons derived . . . this book is recommended reading for those who cherish the heritage of the gallant ‘rabble in arms’ that risked all for American independence.” —Long Island Historical Journal“Long neglected . . . the Battle of Brooklyn is given comprehensive coverage . . . using a lively writing style Gallagher makes it easy to visualize the actual skirmishes by providing interesting details.” —Flintlock and Powderhorn
If By Sea
Author: George C. Daughan
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0786731931
Pages: 568
Year: 2008-05-13
View: 299
Read: 663
The American Revolution-and thus the history of the United States-began not on land but on the sea. Paul Revere began his famous midnight ride not by jumping on a horse, but by scrambling into a skiff with two other brave patriots to cross Boston Harbor to Charlestown. Revere and his companions rowed with muffled oars to avoid capture by the British warships closely guarding the harbor. As they paddled silently, Revere's neighbor was flashing two lanterns from the belfry of Old North Church, signaling patriots in Charlestown that the redcoats were crossing the Charles River in longboats. In every major Revolutionary battle thereafter the sea would play a vital, if historically neglected, role. When the American colonies took up arms against Great Britain, they were confronting the greatest sea-power of the age. And it was during the War of Independence that the American Navy was born. But following the British naval model proved crushingly expensive, and the Founding Fathers fought viciously for decades over whether or not the fledgling republic truly needed a deep-water fleet. The debate ended only when the Federal Navy proved indispensable during the War of 1812. Drawing on decades of prodigious research, historian George C. Daughan chronicles the embattled origins of the U.S. Navy. From the bloody and gunpowder-drenched battles fought by American sailors on lakes and high seas to the fierce rhetorical combat waged by the Founders in Congress, If By Sea charts the course by which the Navy became a vital and celebrated American institution.
Bunker Hill
Author: Nathaniel Philbrick
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0670025445
Pages: 398
Year: 2013
View: 467
Read: 508
The best-selling author of Mayflower presents a book inspired by the Boston battle that ignited the American Revolution, tracing the experiences of Patriot leader Dr. Joseph Warren, a newly recruited George Washington and British General William Howe.
Joe Gould's Teeth
Author: Jill Lepore
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 1101971797
Pages: 235
Year: 2017-04-18
View: 476
Read: 594
"A "New Yorker" staff writer and Harvard historian chronicles the discovery of Joe Gould's long-lost manuscript, "The Oral History of Our Time," and of the violence, betrayals, and madness that led to its concealment,"--NoveList.
The Politically Incorrect Guide to the American Revolution
Author: Larry Schweikart, Dave Dougherty
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1621576507
Pages: 256
Year: 2017-06-26
View: 534
Read: 1285
The truth about the American Revolution is under attack. Despite what you may have learned in school, it wasn't a rich slaveholder's war fought to "maintain white privilege." In fact, the War of Independence wasn't about maintaining any status quo—it was the world's first successful bottom-up revolution by the people, ushering in a new dawn of liberty that history had never seen before. But with left-wingers dominating the teaching of history, where can you go for the true story of the unprecedented events that made the United States the worlds greatest nation? Now bestselling historian Larry Schweikart has teamed up with author Dave Dougherty to write the ground-breaking patriotic history you've always wanted to read about the foundation of our unique nation. The Politically Incorrect Guide to the American Revolution reveals: Four key factors that applied only in America, making it impossible to replicate the Revolution anywhere else Why it matters that the Patriot ghting force was overwhelmingly Scotch-Irish The key role of Protestantism: which denominations tended to become Patriots, and which Tories How Americans were different from the Europeans and English even at the outset of the Revolution How the casualties of the deadliest war in American history are routinely underreported How our Revolution became a model for hundreds of others—that all failed Schweikart and Dougherty take on the left-wing myths—starting with the Marxist narrative of the Revolution in Howard Zinn's nearly ubiquitous A People's History of the United States—and uncover the truth about America's beginning.

Recently Visited