Revolution On The Hudson New York City And The Hudson River Valley In The American War Of Independence Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Revolution on the Hudson: New York City and the Hudson River Valley in the American War of Independence
Author: George C. Daughan
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 039324573X
Pages: 432
Year: 2016-06-13
View: 1238
Read: 877
The untold story of the fight for the Hudson River Valley, control of which, both the Americans and the British firmly believed, would determine the outcome of the Revolutionary War. No part of the country was more contested during the American Revolution than New York City, the Hudson River, and the surrounding counties. Political and military leaders on both sides viewed the Hudson River Valley as the American jugular, which, if cut, would quickly bleed the rebellion to death. So in 1776, King George III sent the largest amphibious force ever assembled to seize Manhattan and use it as a base from which to push up the Hudson River Valley for a grand rendezvous at Albany with an impressive army driving down from Canada. George Washington and every other patriot leader shared the king’s fixation with the Hudson. Generations of American and British historians have held the same view. In fact, one of the few things that scholars have agreed upon is that the British strategy, though disastrously executed, should have been swift and effective. Until now, no one has argued that this plan of action was lunacy from the beginning. Revolution on the Hudson makes the bold new argument that Britain’s attempt to cut off New England never would have worked, and that doggedly pursuing dominance of the Hudson ultimately cost the crown her colonies. It unpacks intricate military maneuvers on land and sea, introduces the personalities presiding over each side’s strategy, and reinterprets the vagaries of colonial politics to offer a thrilling response to one of our most vexing historical questions: How could a fledgling nation have defeated the most powerful war machine of the era? George C. Daughan—winner of the prestigious Samuel Eliot Morrison Award for Naval Literature—integrates the war’s naval elements with its political, military, economic, and social dimensions to create a major new study of the American Revolution. Revolution on the Hudson offers a much clearer understanding of our founding conflict, and how it transformed a rebellion that Britain should have crushed into a war they could never win.
Revolution on the Hudson
Author: George C. Daughan
Publisher: W. W. Norton
ISBN: 0393354148
Pages: 448
Year: 2017-06-06
View: 456
Read: 1312
The untold story of the fight for the Hudson River Valley, control of which, both the Americans and the British firmly believed, would determine the outcome of the Revolutionary War.
Chaining the Hudson
Author: Lincoln Diamant
Publisher: Fordham Univ Press
ISBN: 0823223396
Pages: 233
Year: 2004
View: 379
Read: 1117
Much of the Revolutionary War took was fought along the Hudson River-which for five years was successfully blockaded by American forces by means of a massive chain across the river at West Point. Here is this important story, vividly and dramatically told, from logs, diaries, letters, and with many rare illustrations.In an almost magical sense the reader is drawn back to the time when the country drew its first breath.-The New York TimesBrings to life an extraordinary chapter of the Revolution.-Washington Post[The] best account to date of the Revolutionary War activity in the Valley.-Hudson Valley Regional ReviewMeticulously researched. Reads like good historical fiction.-American History
George Washington's Westchester Gamble
Author: Richard Borkow
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1625842139
Pages: 192
Year: 2011-05-31
View: 1109
Read: 651
During the summer of 1781, the armies of Generals Washington and Rochambeau were encamped in lower Westchester County at Dobbs Ferry, Ardsley, Hartsdale, Edgemont and White Plains. It was a time of military deadlock and grim prospects for the allied Americans and French. Washington recognized that a decisive victory was needed or America would never achieve independence. In August, he marched these soldiers to Virginia to face General Cornwallis and his redcoats. Washington risked all on this march. Its success required secrecy, and he prepared an elaborate deception to convince the British that Manhattan, not Virginia, was the target of the allied armies. Local historian Richard Borkow presents this exciting story of the Westchester encampment and Washingtons great gamble that saved the United States.
Lexington and Concord: The Battle Heard Round the World
Author: George C. Daughan
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393245756
Pages: 384
Year: 2018-04-03
View: 189
Read: 1320
An award-winning historian reinterprets the battle that launched the American Revolution. George C. Daughan’s magnificently detailed account of the Battle of Lexington and Concord challenges the prevailing narrative of the American War of Independence. It was, Daughan argues, based as much in economic concerns as political ones. When Massachusetts militiamen turned out in overwhelming numbers to fight the British, they believed they were fighting for their farms and livelihoods, as well as for liberty. Benjamin Franklin was not surprised by this widespread belief. In the years prior to the Revolution, Franklin had toured Great Britain and witnessed the wretched living conditions of the king’s subjects. They wore rags for clothes, went barefoot, and had little to eat. They were not citizens, but serfs. Franklin described the appalling situation in a number of letters home. In the eyes of many American colonists, Britain’s repressive measures were not seen simply as an effort to reestablish political control of the colonies, but also as a means to reduce the prosperous colonists themselves to the serfdom described in the Franklin letters. Another key factor in the outcome of this historic battle, according to Daughan, was the scorn British officers had for colonial fighters. Although the British officers had fought alongside colonial Americans in the ferocious French and Indian War, they failed to anticipate the skill, organization, and sheer numbers of the colonial militias. Daughan explains how British arrogance led them to defeat at the hands of motivated, experienced patriot fighters determined to protect their way of life. Authoritative and immersive, Lexington and Concord gives us a new understanding of a battle that became a template for colonial uprisings in later centuries.
Other New York, The
Author: Joseph S. Tiedemann
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 0791483681
Pages: 258
Year: 2012-02-01
View: 668
Read: 721
Essays exploring rural New York during the American Revolution.
The Politically Incorrect Guide to the American Revolution
Author: Larry Schweikart, Dave Dougherty
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1621576507
Pages: 256
Year: 2017-06-26
View: 1274
Read: 655
The truth about the American Revolution is under attack. Despite what you may have learned in school, it wasn't a rich slaveholder's war fought to "maintain white privilege." In fact, the War of Independence wasn't about maintaining any status quo—it was the world's first successful bottom-up revolution by the people, ushering in a new dawn of liberty that history had never seen before. But with left-wingers dominating the teaching of history, where can you go for the true story of the unprecedented events that made the United States the worlds greatest nation? Now bestselling historian Larry Schweikart has teamed up with author Dave Dougherty to write the ground-breaking patriotic history you've always wanted to read about the foundation of our unique nation. The Politically Incorrect Guide to the American Revolution reveals: Four key factors that applied only in America, making it impossible to replicate the Revolution anywhere else Why it matters that the Patriot ghting force was overwhelmingly Scotch-Irish The key role of Protestantism: which denominations tended to become Patriots, and which Tories How Americans were different from the Europeans and English even at the outset of the Revolution How the casualties of the deadliest war in American history are routinely underreported How our Revolution became a model for hundreds of others—that all failed Schweikart and Dougherty take on the left-wing myths—starting with the Marxist narrative of the Revolution in Howard Zinn's nearly ubiquitous A People's History of the United States—and uncover the truth about America's beginning.
1777
Author: Dean Snow
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190618779
Pages: 480
Year: 2016-09-09
View: 997
Read: 1122
In the autumn of 1777, near Saratoga, New York, an inexperienced and improvised American army led by General Horatio Gates faced off against the highly trained British and German forces led by General John Burgoyne. The British strategy in confronting the Americans in upstate New York was to separate rebellious New England from the other colonies. Despite inferior organization and training, the Americans exploited access to fresh reinforcements of men and materiel, and ultimately handed the British a stunning defeat. The American victory, for the first time in the war, confirmed that independence from Great Britain was all but inevitable. Assimilating the archaeological remains from the battlefield along with the many letters, journals, and memoirs of the men and women in both camps, Dean Snow's 1777 provides a richly detailed narrative of the two battles fought at Saratoga over the course of thirty-three tense and bloody days. While the contrasting personalities of Gates and Burgoyne are well known, they are but two of the many actors who make up the larger drama of Saratoga. Snow highlights famous and obscure participants alike, from the brave but now notorious turncoat Benedict Arnold to Frederika von Riedesel, the wife of a British major general who later wrote an important eyewitness account of the battles. The author, an archaeologist who excavated on the Saratoga battlefield, combines a vivid sense of time and place-with details on weather, terrain, and technology-and a keen understanding of the adversaries' motivations, challenges, and heroism into a suspenseful, novel-like account. A must-read for anyone with an interest in American history, 1777 is an intimate retelling of the campaign that tipped the balance in the American War of Independence.
Alexander Hamilton's Revolution
Author: Phillip Thomas Tucker
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
ISBN: 1510716602
Pages: 376
Year: 2017-08-22
View: 1106
Read: 688
Despite his less-than-promising beginnings as the only key Founding Father not born and raised on American soil, Hamilton was one of the best and brightest of his generation. His notoriety has rested almost entirely on his role as Secretary of the Treasury in Washington's administration, yet few realize that Washington and Hamilton's bond was forged during the Revolutionary War. Alexander Hamilton's Revolution is the first book to explore Hamilton's critical role during the battle for independence. New information presents a little-known and underpublished aspect of Hamilton's life: that he was not only Washington's favorite staff officer, but also his right-hand man for most of the Revolution, serving as Chief of Staff from 1777 to early 1781. While he found this position rewarding, Hamilton continually asked Washington for a field command. Hamilton's wish was granted at the decisive battle of Yorktown, where his Infantry Battalion charged on the defensive bastion on Cornwallis's left flank. Hamilton's capture of this position, while French forced captured the adjacent position, sealed Cornwallis's fate and forced his surrender and ultimate colonial victory. The entire patriotic cause benefited immeasurably from the advice and strategies provided to Washington by his youngest staff officer, Alexander Hamilton. Now, those critical contributions are brought to light in Hamilton's Revolution.
The War Before Independence
Author: Derek W. Beck
Publisher: Sourcebooks, Inc.
ISBN: 1492633100
Pages: 480
Year: 2016-05-03
View: 848
Read: 1046
The United States was creeping ever closer to independence. The shot heard round the world still echoed in the ears of Parliament as impassioned revolutionaries took up arms for and against King and country. In this captivating blend of careful research and rich narrative, Derek W. Beck continues his exploration into the period preceding the Declaration of Independence, just days into the new Revolutionary War. The War Before Independence transports readers into the violent years of 1775 and 1776, with the infamous Battle of Bunker Hill a turning point in the Revolution and the snowy, wind-swept march to the frozen ground at the Battle of Quebec, ending with the exciting conclusion of the Boston Campaign. Meticulous research and new material drawn from letters, diaries, and investigative research throws open the doors not only to familiar figures and faces, but also little-known triumphs and tribulations of America's greatest military leaders, including George Washington. Wonderfully detailed and stunningly layered, The War Before Independence brings America's early upheaval to a ferocious boil on both sides of the battlefield, and vividly captures the spirit of a fight that continues to inspire brave hearts today.
If By Sea
Author: George C. Daughan
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0786731931
Pages: 568
Year: 2008-05-13
View: 690
Read: 483
The American Revolution-and thus the history of the United States-began not on land but on the sea. Paul Revere began his famous midnight ride not by jumping on a horse, but by scrambling into a skiff with two other brave patriots to cross Boston Harbor to Charlestown. Revere and his companions rowed with muffled oars to avoid capture by the British warships closely guarding the harbor. As they paddled silently, Revere's neighbor was flashing two lanterns from the belfry of Old North Church, signaling patriots in Charlestown that the redcoats were crossing the Charles River in longboats. In every major Revolutionary battle thereafter the sea would play a vital, if historically neglected, role. When the American colonies took up arms against Great Britain, they were confronting the greatest sea-power of the age. And it was during the War of Independence that the American Navy was born. But following the British naval model proved crushingly expensive, and the Founding Fathers fought viciously for decades over whether or not the fledgling republic truly needed a deep-water fleet. The debate ended only when the Federal Navy proved indispensable during the War of 1812. Drawing on decades of prodigious research, historian George C. Daughan chronicles the embattled origins of the U.S. Navy. From the bloody and gunpowder-drenched battles fought by American sailors on lakes and high seas to the fierce rhetorical combat waged by the Founders in Congress, If By Sea charts the course by which the Navy became a vital and celebrated American institution.
Washington's Spies
Author: Alexander Rose
Publisher: Bantam
ISBN: 055339259X
Pages: 369
Year: 2014
View: 673
Read: 348
In 1778, George Washington unleashed an unlikely ring of spies in New York to discover British battle plans.
The Struggle for Sea Power: A Naval History of the American Revolution
Author: Sam Willis
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393248836
Pages: 672
Year: 2016-02-15
View: 658
Read: 711
A fascinating naval perspective on one of the greatest of all historical conundrums: How did thirteen isolated colonies, which in 1775 began a war with Britain without a navy or an army, win their independence from the greatest naval and military power on earth? The American Revolution involved a naval war of immense scope and variety, including no fewer than twenty-two navies fighting on five oceans—to say nothing of rivers and lakes. In no other war were so many large-scale fleet battles fought, one of which was the most strategically significant naval battle in all of British, French, and American history. Simultaneous naval campaigns were fought in the English Channel, the North and Mid-Atlantic, the Mediterranean, off South Africa, in the Indian Ocean, the Caribbean, the Pacific, the North Sea and, of course, off the eastern seaboard of America. Not until the Second World War would any nation actively fight in so many different theaters. In The Struggle for Sea Power, Sam Willis traces every key military event in the path to American independence from a naval perspective, and he also brings this important viewpoint to bear on economic, political, and social developments that were fundamental to the success of the Revolution. In doing so Willis offers valuable new insights into American, British, French, Spanish, Dutch, and Russian history. This unique account of the American Revolution gives us a new understanding of the influence of sea power upon history, of the American path to independence, and of the rise and fall of the British Empire.
American Revolution 100
Author: Michael Lanning
Publisher: Sourcebooks, Inc.
ISBN: 1402241704
Pages: 384
Year: 2009-11-01
View: 839
Read: 813
Experience the defining moments of the war that gave birth to America The American Revolution 100 brings to life the monumental moments, bloody battles, and influential leaders who gave birth to a great nation. In comprehensive fashion, decorated veteran and military expert Michael Lee Lanning ranks and analyzes the war's most significant events, showing how each affected the outcome. Relive the memorable battles, when a country of citizen-farmers prepared themselves to take on the mightiest army in the world. Learn about the remarkable figures and forces of the time, and decide for yourself: Who influenced the revolution more—John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, or John Paul Jones? Was the Battle of Yorktown more pivotal than the Battle of Trenton? Was The Declaration of Independence more important to the revolution than Thomas Paine's Common Sense? Read the stories of Henry Knox, Thomas Sumter, American militias, and December 26, 1776, and let your own debates begin… Praise for Michael Lee Lanning's history books: "Easily accessible…Recommended reference for the aficionado and the uninitiated alike." ForeWord magazine "Unusual and even witty insights also abound." Publishers Weekly
Bunker Hill
Author: Nathaniel Philbrick
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0670025445
Pages: 398
Year: 2013
View: 668
Read: 665
The best-selling author of Mayflower presents a book inspired by the Boston battle that ignited the American Revolution, tracing the experiences of Patriot leader Dr. Joseph Warren, a newly recruited George Washington and British General William Howe.

Recently Visited