Raising White Kids Bringing Up Children In A Racially Unjust America Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Raising White Kids
Author: Jennifer Harvey
Publisher: Abingdon Press
ISBN: 150185643X
Pages:
Year: 2018-01-16
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With a foreword by Tim Wise, Raising White Kids is for families, churches, educators, and communities who want to equip their children to be active and able participants in a society that is becoming one of the most racially diverse in the world while remaining full of racial tensions. For white people who are committed to equity and justice, living in a nation that remains racially unjust and deeply segregated creates unique conundrums. These conundrums begin early in life and impact the racial development of white children in powerful ways. What can we do within our homes, communities and schools? Should we teach our children to be “colorblind”? Or, should we teach them to notice race? What roles do we want to equip them to play in addressing racism when they encounter it? What strategies will help our children learn to function well in a diverse nation? Talking about race means naming the reality of white privilege and hierarchy. How do we talk about race honestly, then, without making our children feel bad about being white? Most importantly, how do we do any of this in age-appropriate ways? While a great deal of public discussion exists in regard to the impact of race and racism on children of color, meaningful dialogue about and resources for understanding the impact of race on white children are woefully absent. Raising White Kids steps into that void.
Raising White Kids
Author: Jennifer Harvey
Publisher:
ISBN: 1501878077
Pages: 320
Year: 2019-02-05
View: 1175
Read: 1069
With a foreword by Tim Wise, Raising White Kids is for families, churches, educators, and communities who want to equip their children to be active and able participants in a society that is becoming one of the most racially diverse in the world while remaining full of racial tensions. For white people who are committed to equity and justice, living in a nation that remains racially unjust and deeply segregated creates unique conundrums. These conundrums begin early in life and impact the racial development of white children in powerful ways. What can we do within our homes, communities and schools? Should we teach our children to be "colorblind"? Or, should we teach them to notice race? What roles do we want to equip them to play in addressing racism when they encounter it? What strategies will help our children learn to function well in a diverse nation? Talking about race means naming the reality of white privilege and hierarchy. How do we talk about race honestly, then, without making our children feel bad about being white? Most importantly, how do we do any of this in age-appropriate ways? While a great deal of public discussion exists in regard to the impact of race and racism on children of color, meaningful dialogue about and resources for understanding the impact of race on white children are woefully absent. Raising White Kids steps into that void.
Raising White Kids
Author: Jennifer Harvey
Publisher:
ISBN: 1501856421
Pages: 320
Year: 2018
View: 372
Read: 846
Help children function well in a diverse nation.
White Kids
Author: Margaret A. Hagerman
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479803685
Pages: 280
Year: 2018-09-04
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Riveting stories of how affluent, white children learn about race American kids are living in a world of ongoing public debates about race, daily displays of racial injustice, and for some, an increased awareness surrounding diversity and inclusion. In this heated context, sociologist Margaret A. Hagerman zeroes in on affluent, white kids to observe how they make sense of privilege, unequal educational opportunities, and police violence. In fascinating detail, Hagerman considers the role that they and their families play in the reproduction of racism and racial inequality in America. White Kids, based on two years of research involving in-depth interviews with white kids and their families, is a clear-eyed and sometimes shocking account of how white kids learn about race. In doing so, this book explores questions such as, “How do white kids learn about race when they grow up in families that do not talk openly about race or acknowledge its impact?” and “What about children growing up in families with parents who consider themselves to be ‘anti-racist’?” Featuring the actual voices of young, affluent white kids and what they think about race, racism, inequality, and privilege, White Kids illuminates how white racial socialization is much more dynamic, complex, and varied than previously recognized. It is a process that stretches beyond white parents’ explicit conversations with their white children and includes not only the choices parents make about neighborhoods, schools, peer groups, extracurricular activities, and media, but also the choices made by the kids themselves. By interviewing kids who are growing up in different racial contexts—from racially segregated to meaningfully integrated and from politically progressive to conservative—this important book documents key differences in the outcomes of white racial socialization across families. And by observing families in their everyday lives, this book explores the extent to which white families, even those with anti-racist intentions, reproduce and reinforce the forms of inequality they say they reject.
Dear White Christians
Author: Jennifer Harvey
Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing
ISBN: 0802872077
Pages: 272
Year: 2014-11-26
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In this provocative book Jennifer Harvey argues for a radical shift in how justice-committed white Christians think about race. She calls for moving away from the reconciliation paradigm that currently dominates interracial relations and embracing instead a reparations paradigm. Harvey presents an insightful historical analysis of the painful fissures that emerged among activist Christians toward the end of the Civil Rights movement, and she shows the necessity of bringing "white" racial identity into clear view in order to counter today's oppressive social structures. A deeply constructive, hopeful work, Dear White Christians will help readers envision new racial possibilities, including concrete examples of contemporary reparations initiatives. This book is for any who care about the gospel call to justice but feel stuck trying to get there, given the ongoing prevalence of deep racial divisions in the church and society at large. W atch a 2015 interview with the author:
Disrupting White Supremacy from Within
Author: Jennifer Harvey, Karin A. Case, Robin Hawley Gorsline
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 291
Year: 2004
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The contributors to Disrupting White Supremacy from Within, an all-white group of theologians, ethicists, teachers, ministers, and activists, propose that a fundamental part of the answer to these two questions lies in white peoples' unwillingness to admit, understand, and confront the power of white supremacy in their own lives. Through careful, thoughtful examination of the nature and workings of race, racism, and white supremacy, the contributors have provided a resource that will help white people do their own work of confronting and understanding the impact of white supremacy in the malformation of their own souls, acknowledging its devastating effects on people of color, and taking their own steps toward its abolishment.
White Parents, Black Children
Author: Darron T. Smith, Cardell K. Jacobson, Brenda G. Juárez
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442207620
Pages: 162
Year: 2011-11-16
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Looks at the difficult issues of race in transracial adoptions -- particularly the most common adoption demographic of white parents with children from other racial and ethnic groups.
Everyday White People Confront Racial and Social Injustice
Author: Eddie Moore, Marguerite W. Penick-Parks, Ali Michael
Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC
ISBN: 1620362104
Pages: 206
Year: 2015-03-10
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While we are all familiar with the lives of prominent Black civil rights leaders, few of us have a sense of what is entailed in developing a White anti-racist identity. Few of us can name the White activists who joined the struggle against discrimination, let alone understand the complexities, stresses and contradictions of doing this work while benefiting from the privileges they enjoyed as Whites. This book fills that gap by vividly presenting – in their own words – the personal stories, experiences and reflections of fifteen prominent White anti-racists. They recount the circumstances that led them to undertake this work, describe key moments and insights along their journeys, and frankly admit their continuing lapses and mistakes. They make it clear that confronting oppression (including their own prejudices) – whether about race, sexual orientation, ability or other differences – is a lifelong process of learning. The chapters in this book are full of inspirational and lesson-rich stories about the expanding awareness of White social justice advocates and activists who grappled with their White privilege and their early socialization and decided to work against structural injustice and personal prejudice. The authors are also self-critical, questioning their motivations and commitments, and acknowledging that – as Whites and possessors of other privileged identities – they continue to benefit from White privilege even as they work against it. This is an eye-opening book for anyone who wants to understand what it means to be White and the reality of what is involved in becoming a White anti-racist and social justice advocate; is interested in the paths taken by those who have gone before; and wants to engage reflectively and critically in this difficult and important work. Contributing Authors Warren J. Blumenfeld Abby L. Ferber Jane K. Fernandes Michelle Fine Diane J. Goodman Paul C. Gorski Heather W. Hackman Gary R. Howard Kevin Jennings Frances E. Kendall Paul Kivel James W. Loewen Peggy McIntosh Julie O’Mara Alan Rabinowitz Andrea Rabinowitz Christine E. Sleeter
Anxious to Talk about It
Author: Carolyn B. Helsel
Publisher: Chalice Press
ISBN: 0827200730
Pages: 136
Year: 2018-02-13
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"Wait... We're talking about what? I'm not so sure I want to do that." When it comes to discussing racism, many white people are overwhelmed with anxiety, leading to a fight-or-flight response. In Anxious to Talk About It, pastor and professor Carolyn B. Helsel draws on her successful experiences with white congregations to offer us tools to embrace and explore these anxious feelings. Through the sharing of our stories, new insights on racial identity, and spiritual practices to help you engage racial justice concerns prayerfully, you'll begin to overcome your anxiety and learn to join conversations with less fear, more compassion, and more knowledge of self, others, and the important issues at stake. Helsel's words and guidance will inspire you to receive the gifts that come through these difficult conversations and point to how you can get further involved in the important work around race relations. While Anxious to Talk About It can be read alone, reading it with a group is strongly recommended to help deepen and broaden the discussion, integrate the material and practice with others. Free Study Guide available at www.chalicepress.com.
No Religion but Social Religion
Author: Joerg Rieger, Paulo Ayres Mattos, Helmut Renders, Jose Carlos Souza
Publisher: BookBaby
ISBN: 1945935170
Pages: 129
Year: 2018-04-24
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In the Wesleyan traditions, social religion is more interesting and more challenging. Social religion is a matter of being in relationship with God and with others, and it is a public matter, as religion, in John Wesley's words, "cannot subsist at all without society, without living and conversing" with other people.3 These others—and this is crucial—include not only other Christians but also those whom most Christians would rather avoid, like people who, according to Wesley, "do not obey, perhaps do not believe, the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ" and others who are hungry and naked.4 This insight is a major contribution of Wesleyan theology picked up by liberation theologies (many of them Wesleyan, as we shall see), and it turns many dominant understandings of the church upside down.5 Without such relationships there would be no real religion, and the gospel would make no difference. Pulling all stops, Wesley concludes that those who do not care about others "shall go away into everlasting fire."
Waking Up White, and Finding Myself in the Story of Race
Author: Debby Irving
Publisher:
ISBN: 0991331303
Pages: 273
Year: 2014-01
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For twenty-five years, Debby Irving sensed inexplicable racial tensions in her personal and professional relationships. As a colleague and neighbor, she worried about offending people she dearly wanted to befriend. As an arts administrator, she didn't understand why her diversity efforts lacked traction. As a teacher, she found her best efforts to reach out to students and families of color left her wondering what she was missing. Then, in 2009, one "aha!" moment launched an adventure of discovery and insight that drastically shifted her worldview and upended her life plan. In Waking Up White, Irving tells her often cringe-worthy story with such openness that readers will turn every page rooting for her-and ultimately for all of us.
The Black-White Test Score Gap
Author: Christopher Jencks, Meredith Phillips
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press
ISBN: 0815746113
Pages: 536
Year: 2011-01-01
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The test score gap between blacks and whites--on vocabulary, reading, and math tests, as well as on tests that claim to measure scholastic aptitude and intelligence--is large enough to have far-reaching social and economic consequences. In their introduction to this book, Christopher Jencks and Meredith Phillips argue that eliminating the disparity would dramatically reduce economic and educational inequality between blacks and whites. Indeed, they think that closing the gap would do more to promote racial equality than any other strategy now under serious discussion. The book offers a comprehensive look at the factors that contribute to the test score gap and discusses options for substantially reducing it. Although significant attempts have been made over the past three decades to shrink the test score gap, including increased funding for predominantly black schools, desegregation of southern schools, and programs to alleviate poverty, the median black American still scores below 75 percent of American whites on most standardized tests. The book brings together recent evidence on some of the most controversial and puzzling aspects of the test score debate, including the role of test bias, heredity, and family background. It also looks at how and why the gap has changed over the past generation, reviews the educational, psychological, and cultural explanations for the gap, and analyzes its educational and economic consequences. The authors demonstrate that traditional explanations account for only a small part of the black-white test score gap. They argue that this is partly because traditional explanations have put too much emphasis on racial disparities in economic resources, both in homes and in schools, and on demographic factors like family structure. They say that successful theories will put more emphasis on psychological and cultural factors, such as the way black and white parents teach their children to deal with things they do not know or understand, and the way black and white children respond to the same classroom experiences. Finally, they call for large-scale experiments to determine the effects of schools' racial mix, class size, ability grouping, and other policies. In addition to the editors, the contributors include Claude Steele, Ronald Ferguson, William G. Bowen, Philip Cook, and William Julius Wilson.
Spare the Kids
Author: Stacey Patton
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807061042
Pages: 238
Year: 2017
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"Spare the Kids examines the cultural tradition of corporal punishment in Black homes and its connections to racial violence in America. The impact on child rearing among so many black families of Stacey Patton's Spare the Kids may well prove as powerfully corrective as Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin was upon the acceptance of chattel slavery. David Levering Lewis, two-time Pulitzer Prize winner for biographies on W. E. B. Du Bois"--NoveList.
Whiteness and Morality
Author: J. Harvey
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230604943
Pages: 264
Year: 2007-06-14
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This book considers how white U.S.-Americans may participate in racial justice-making, and shows how 'white' identities embody problematic moral realities, arguing that reparations for people of African descent and sovereignty for Native peoples are critical for racial justice and transformation of what it means to be white in the United States.
Raising Mixed Race
Author: Sharon H Chang
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317330501
Pages: 264
Year: 2015-12-11
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Research continues to uncover early childhood as a crucial time when we set the stage for who we will become. In the last decade, we have also seen a sudden massive shift in America’s racial makeup with the majority of the current under-5 age population being children of color. Asian and multiracial are the fastest growing self-identified groups in the United States. More than 2 million people indicated being mixed race Asian on the 2010 Census. Yet, young multiracial Asian children are vastly underrepresented in the literature on racial identity. Why? And what are these children learning about themselves in an era that tries to be ahistorical, believes the race problem has been “solved,” and that mixed race people are proof of it? This book is drawn from extensive research and interviews with sixty-eight parents of multiracial children. It is the first to examine the complex task of supporting our youngest around being “two or more races” and Asian while living amongst “post-racial” ideologies.