Quentin Tarantino The Man The Myths And The Movies Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Quentin Tarantino
Author: Wensley Clarkson
Publisher: Blake Publishing
ISBN: 1844543668
Pages: 313
Year: 2007
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Examines the personal life, professional work, and success of the director of "Reservoir Dogs," "Pulp Fiction," "Jackie Brown," and "Kill Bill."
Quentin Tarantino
Author: Paul A. Woods
Publisher: Plexus Publishing
ISBN:
Pages: 190
Year: 2005-08-10
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Transcending his reputation as a maker of violent movies, Quentin Tarantino is recognised by his fans and admirers as a spokesman for the obsessions of a media-literate generation. Movies, TV shows, comic strips and old Top Ten records all merge to form the Tarantino popculture aesthetic. In charting his career, Quentin Tarantino: The Film Geek Files provides a colourful guide to the brash, image-saturated world that spawned the premier filmmaker of his generation.
Raised by Wolves
Author: Jerome Charyn
Publisher: Da Capo Press
ISBN: 1560258586
Pages: 240
Year: 2006-05-24
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When Quentin Tarantino was eight years old, and all the regular kids were lining up to see the latest from Disney, Tarantino's mother took him to see Carnal Knowledge. Sound about right? A high-school dropout who never attended film school, Tarantino got all the education he needed while working the register at Los Angeles's fabled Video Archives. His enthusiasms — for pop culture (foreign and domestic), eye-popping aesthetics, and genre films — would become notorious and infectious. The outrageous success of Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction essentially killed off Tarantino the man, and gave birth to Tarantino the myth. Here, from legendary novelist and historian Jerome Charyn, is a portrait of both the man AND the myth — and the mind behind them both. More than a biography, more than a critical study, Raised by Wolves is a feisty and astute reckoning with Tarantino en toto.
Quentin Tarantino
Author: Jami Bernard
Publisher:
ISBN: 0002556448
Pages: 288
Year: 1995
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An exploration of the mythology and philosophies of the Hollywood writer and director of the films "Reservoir dogs", "Pulp fiction" and "Natural born killers".
Renegade Westerns
Author: Kevin Grant, Clark Hodgkiss
Publisher:
ISBN: 1903254930
Pages: 400
Year: 2018-04-26
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The Western is America's definitive contribution to cinema, a bullet-spattered blueprint for the nation's image of itself and its place in the world. To watch a western is to witness the birth of a nation, overseen by square-jawed sheriffs and steel-nerved gunfighters, armed with six-guns and a clear moral vision. Their victories against outlaws and Indians were proof that might was right -- so long as it was in the correct hands. Renegade Westerns shows the shadowy side of this picture, where heroes behaved like villains, where Indians were not always the savages we'd been led to expect. From injustice in The Ox-Bow Incident to racism in The Searchers, numerous films criticised the methods behind the myths and the personalities behind the legends. They questioned the simple belief that the destiny of the United States was to expand right across the continent, regardless of other peoples' claims to the land. The cast of characters includes cynical mercenaries and ageing cowhands, gun-toting cattle queens and teenage outlaws. We encounter western superstars -- John Wayne and Clint Eastwood, Gary Cooper and Robert Mitchum -- and icons of modern film -- Brad Pitt and Samuel L. Jackson, Johnny Depp and Michael Fassbender. More than 100 films are dissected and discussed, from the hidden depths of High Noon and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance to the ferocity of The Wild Bunch. There are skewed biopics of Billy the Kid and Jesse James, acid westerns and Cold War parables. The book ranges over 70 years of movie-making, right up to the biggest westerns of recent times -- The Homesman and Slow West, and a double-barrelled blast of Tarantino: Django Unchained and The Hateful Eight. Complete with a foreword by western expert Edward Buscombe and first-hand accounts by Wild Bunch stars Bo Hopkins and LQ Jones, Renegade Westerns offers a fresh perspective on a genre that continues to attract both large audiences and critical acclaim.
Tough Sh*t
Author: Kevin Smith
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 110155424X
Pages: 272
Year: 2012-03-20
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That Kevin Smith? The guy who did “Clerks” a million years ago? Didn’t they bounce his fat ass off a plane once? What could you possibly learn from the director of “Cop Out”? How about this: he changed filmmaking forever when he was twenty-three, and since then, he’s done whatever the hell he wants. He makes movies, writes comics, owns a store, and now he’s built a podcasting empire with his friends and family, including a wife who’s way out of his league. So here’s some tough shit: Kevin Smith has cracked the code. Or, he’s just cracked. Tough Sh*t is the dirty business that Kevin has been digesting for 41 years and now, he’s ready to put it in your hands. Smear this shit all over yourself, because this is your blueprint (or brownprint) for success. Kev takes you through some big moments in his life to help you live your days in as Gretzky a fashion as you can: going where the puck is gonna be. Read all about how a zero like Smith managed to make ten movies with no discernible talent, and how when he had everything he thought he’d ever want, he decided to blow up his own career. Along the way, Kev shares stories about folks who inspired him (like George Carlin), folks who befuddled him (like Bruce Willis), and folks who let him jerk off onto their legs (like his beloved wife, Jen). So make this your daily reader. Hell, read it on the toilet if you want. Just make sure you grab the bowl and push, because you’re about to take one Tough Sh*t.
Peckinpah
Author: Paul Seydor
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252068351
Pages: 410
Year: 1999
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"The book that re-established Peckinpah's reputation-now thoroughly revised and updated! When critics hailed the 1995 re-release of Sam Peckinpah's masterpiece, The Wild Bunch, it was a recognition of Paul Seydor's earlier claim that this was a milestone in American film, perhaps the most important since Citizen Kane. Peckinpah: The Western Films first appeared in 1980, when the director's reputation was at low ebb. The book helped lead a generation of readers and filmgoers to a full and enduring appreciation of Peckinpah's landmark films, locating his work in the central tradition of American art that goes all the way back to Emerson, Hawthorne, and Melville. In addition to a new section on the personal significance of The Wild Bunch to Peckinpah, Seydor has added to this expanded, revised edition a complete account of the successful, but troubled, efforts to get a fully authorized director's cut released. He describes how an initial NC-17 rating of the film by the Motion Picture Association of America's ratings board nearly aborted the entire project. He also adds a great wealth of newly discovered biographical detail that has surfaced since the director's death and includes a new chapter on Noon Wine, credited with bringing Peckinpah's television work to a fitting resolution and preparing his way for The Wild Bunch. This edition stands alone in offering full treatment of all versions of Peckinpah's Westerns. It also includes discussion of all fourteen episodes of Peckinpah's television series, The Westerner, and a full description of the versions of Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid now (or formerly) in circulation, including an argument that the label ""director's cut"" on the version in release by Turner is misleading. Additionally, the book's final chapter has been substantially rewritten and now includes new information about Peckinpah's background and sources. "
The Haunted World of Mario Bava
Author: Troy Howarth
Publisher: BearManor Media
ISBN:
Pages:
Year: 2018-04-09
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In the late 1950s, Mario Bava helped to create and define the Italian horror film. His classic directorial works of the 1960s and 1970s, including Black Sunday, Kill, Baby … Kill! and Lisa and the Devil, remain among the most colorful and imaginative in the history of the genre. Bava’s films are rife with unforgettable images—Barbara Steele’s uncanny beauty being brutally violated in Black Sunday, Christopher Lee returning from the grave marked by his bloody demise in The Whip and the Body, the angelic-looking ghost child of Kill, Baby … Kill!, the brutal murder scenes of Blood and Black Lace and Twitch of the Death Nerve—but they are also thematically rich and inter-connected. For many critics, Bava was a gifted stylist but few have bothered to look beneath the surface to uncover the deeper significance of his work. The Haunted World of Mario Bava was first published in 2002. It has now been updated, revised and expanded by author Troy Howarth to give a better overview of Bava’s remarkable legacy as a director and “cinema magician.” This new edition contains new contributions from Bava’s son, director Lamberto Bava, and genre icon Barbara Steele. The book examines all of Bava’s directorial works in detail while also providing a portrait of the man himself—a man for whom publicity and self-promotion was always shied away from, even as he continued to work himself to the point of exhaustion as he improvised and pushed himself to deliver films which would go on to influence such major filmmakers as William Friedkin, Martin Scorsese, Quentin Tarantino, Tim Burton and Joe Dante. Author Troy Howarth “discovered” Bava’s work as a child on late night TV and has worked hard to help bring more serious attention to his films. In addition to holding down a full-time job in the field of social work, he is also a contributor to We Belong Dead magazine and writes reviews for such websites as AV Maniacs and Eccentric Cinema.
Pulp fiction
Author: Dana B. Polan, British Film Institute
Publisher: British Film Institute
ISBN:
Pages: 95
Year: 2000-08-26
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"A BFI book published by Palgrave Macmillan."
Pictures at a Revolution
Author: Mark Harris
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101202858
Pages: 496
Year: 2008-02-14
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The epic human drama behind the making of the five movies nominated for Best Picture in 1967-Guess Who's Coming to Dinner, The Graduate, In the Heat of the Night, Doctor Doolittle, and Bonnie and Clyde-and through them, the larger story of the cultural revolution that transformed Hollywood, and America, forever It's the mid-1960s, and westerns, war movies and blockbuster musicals-Mary Poppins, The Sound of Music-dominate the box office. The Hollywood studio system, with its cartels of talent and its production code, is hanging strong, or so it would seem. Meanwhile, Warren Beatty wonders why his career isn't blooming after the success of his debut in Splendor in the Grass; Mike Nichols wonders if he still has a career after breaking up with Elaine May; and even though Sidney Poitier has just made history by becoming the first black Best Actor winner, he's still feeling completely cut off from opportunities other than the same "noble black man" role. And a young actor named Dustin Hoffman struggles to find any work at all. By the Oscar ceremonies of the spring of 1968, when In the Heat of the Night wins the 1967 Academy Award for Best Picture, a cultural revolution has hit Hollywood with the force of a tsunami. The unprecedented violence and nihilism of fellow nominee Bonnie and Clyde has shocked old-guard reviewers but helped catapult Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway into counterculture stardom and made the movie one of the year's biggest box-office successes. Just as unprecedented has been the run of nominee The Graduate, which launched first-time director Mike Nichols into a long and brilliant career in filmmaking, to say nothing of what it did for Dustin Hoffman, Simon and Garfunkel, and a generation of young people who knew that whatever their future was, it wasn't in plastics. Sidney Poitier has reprised the noble-black-man role, brilliantly, not once but twice, in Guess Who's Coming to Dinner and In the Heat of the Night, movies that showed in different ways both how far America had come on the subject of race in 1967 and how far it still had to go. What City of Nets did for Hollywood in the 1940s and Easy Riders, Raging Bulls for the 1970s, Pictures at a Revolution does for Hollywood and the cultural revolution of the 1960s. As we follow the progress of these five movies, we see an entire industry change and struggle and collapse and grow-we see careers made and ruined, studios born and destroyed, and the landscape of possibility altered beyond all recognition. We see some outsized personalities staking the bets of their lives on a few films that became iconic works that defined the generation-and other outsized personalities making equally large wagers that didn't pan out at all. The product of extraordinary and unprecedented access to the principals of all five films, married to twenty years' worth of insight covering the film industry and a bewitching storyteller's gift, Mark Harris's Pictures at a Revolution is a bravura accomplishment, and a work that feels iconic itself.
Quentin Tarantino
Author: Quentin Tarantino
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 1617038741
Pages: 213
Year: 2013-10-17
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Here, in his own colorful, slangy words, is the true American Dream saga of a self-proclaimed "film geek," with five intense years working in a video store, who became one of the most popular, recognizable, and imitated of all filmmakers. His dazzling, movie-informed work makes Quentin Tarantino's reputation, from his breakout film, Reservoir Dogs (1992), through Kill Bill: Vol. 1 (2003) and Kill Bill: Vol. 2 (2004), his enchanted homages to Asian action cinema, to his rousing tribute to guys-on-a-mission World War II movie, Inglourious Basterds (2009). For those who prefer a more mature, contemplative cinema, Tarantino provided the tender, very touching Jackie Brown (1997). A masterpiece--Pulp Fiction (1994). A delightful mash of unabashed exploitation and felt social consciousness--his latest opus, Django Unchained (2012). From the beginning, Tarantino (b. 1963)--affable, open, and enthusiastic about sharing his adoration of movies--has been a journalist's dream. Quentin Tarantino: Interviews, revised and updated with twelve new interviews, is a joy to read cover to cover because its subject has so much interesting and provocative to say about his own movies and about cinema in general, and also about his unusual life. He is frank and revealing about growing up in Los Angeles with a single, half-Cherokee mother, and dropping out of ninth grade to take acting classes. Lost and confused, he still managed a gutsy ambition: young Quentin decided he would be a filmmaker. Tarantino has conceded that Ordell (Samuel L. Jackson), the homicidal African American con man in Jackie Brown, is an autobiographical portrait. "If I hadn't wanted to make movies, I would have ended up as Ordell," Tarantino has explained. "I wouldn't have been a postman or worked at the phone company. . . . I would have gone to jail."
David Carradine, The Eye Of My Tornado
Author: Marina Anderson
Publisher: BookBaby
ISBN: 0991365968
Pages: 699
Year: 2015-03-11
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This Marina Anderson is not the same person as the erotic book genre author. This Marina Anderson is an established actress, journalist, publicist, jewelry designer and was wife and personal manager to David Carradine. This NEW EDITION contains added information, photographs and stories. David Carradine, The Eye Of My Tornado has been inducted into the Johnny Grant Hollywood Walk of Fame Library. “...it was one long rollercoaster thrill... Mr. Toad’s wild ride...intense passion and emotion. He was the eye of my tornado." "It became my mission to help empower others through our experiences and maybe others will see how they too can help themselves, confront their demons, issues, seek answers, recognize patterns, listen to their instincts, get clarity, closure and healing." Marina Anderson Marina's writing speaks to readers universally by focusing on their personal journey, revealing the truth about the couple, addresses conquering fear and overcoming obstacles, self discovery, recovery, re-inventing and rebuilding one’s self. It’s her survival of self in the marriage while desperately trying to save it. This is an equalized look at the man both critical and sympathetic. Anderson provides a mature, yet loving viewpoint, at their life together and what made them tick as individuals. There’s candor, humor, encompassing the yin-yang, humor, the delight, light and passion of their love and relationship. This personal account represents Anderson’s final therapy, her way to rid the demons that have haunted her, the struggle to regain her “self” back while trying to save her marriage. It’s her heart rendering, empowering struggle of overcoming obstacles to a healthier life and a complex story of two souls, two spirits intertwined. Two dynamic people merging into a karmic-destined, intense and turbulent love relationship. Each struggling with their own demons including sexual abuse and incest. A real-life version of a "fifty shades of gray," their life was replete with love, passion, erotic pleasure, bondage and sexual experimentation. The marriage was marred by a toxic secret (incest) that could not be ignored With the help of re-known celebrity Dr. Drew Pinsky (Celebrity Rehab, Sober House), issues are addressed with the interview occupying an entire chapter. Anderson was able to exorcise the demons that have haunted her for so long about their relationship and herself that almost destroyed her. Marina Anderson was just starting out taking acting lessons at Warner Bros., when she wandered one afternoon onto the candlelit set of a Shaolin temple and met, for the first time, the volatile, dark, and brilliant personality that was actor David Carradine, an international sensation as Kwai Chang Caine in the 1970s hit TV series "Kung Fu," cult hero in the film "Death Race 2000," portrayed Woody Guthrie in Hal Ashby’s "Bound for Glory" and Bill in Quentin Tarantino’s film "Kill Bill." Carradine received four Golden Globe nominations and was a talented songwriter and musician. Twenty years later, Marina and David became lovers. They were married on the Warner Bros. back lot and their six-year relationship was a whirl of auditions, star-studded parties, exotic locations, red carpets and a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Marina, who was already an established actress, became Carradine’s personal manager and publicist and set about rehabilitating his career and reputation of being known for his heavy drinking. She introduced him to Quentin Tarantino, who cast David in the lead role of Bill in the popular film "Kill Bill," which vaulted Carradine back onto the Hollywood A-list. David Carradine died in a Bangkok hotel room, June 3, 2009, an apparent victim of autoerotic asphyxiation. Amid sensational media speculation, Marina refused to let David’s death remain stigmatized like it was and launched her own investigation into the death of her ex-husband. Suicide? Foul play? A sex act gone wrong? Was there a cover-up? Her conclusions are startling.
Once Upon a Time ... the Western
Author: Thomas Brent Smith, Mary-Dailey Desmarais
Publisher: 5 Continents Editions
ISBN: 8874397658
Pages: 304
Year: 2017-08-08
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The Western is the quintessential American epic--a mythic story of nation building, triumphs, failures, and fantasies. This book accompanies the first major exhibition to examine the Western genre and its evolution from the mid-1800s in fine art, film, and popular culture, exploring gender roles, race relations, and gun violence--a story that is about more than cowboys and American Indians, pursuits and duels, or bandits and barroom brawls. From 19th-century landscape paintings by Albert Bierstadt and Frederic Remington to works by Andy Warhol, Ed Ruscha, and Kent Monkman; from the legends of "Buffalo Bill" Cody and Billy the Kid to John Ford's classic films and Sergio Leone's spaghetti Westerns and recent productions by Quentin Tarantino, Ang Lee, and Joel and Ethan Coen, The Western observes how the mythology of the West spread throughout the world and endures today.
The Lampshade
Author: Mark Jacobson
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1416566309
Pages: 368
Year: 2010-09-14
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Few growing up in the aftermath of World War II will ever forget the horrifying reports that Nazi concentration camp doctors had removed the skin of prisoners to makes common, everyday lampshades. In The Lampshade, bestselling journalist Mark Jacobson tells the story of how he came into possession of one of these awful objects, and of his search to establish the origin, and larger meaning, of what can only be described as an icon of terror. Jacobson’s mind-bending historical, moral, and philosophical journey into the recent past and his own soul begins in Hurricane Katrina–ravaged New Orleans. It is only months after the storm, with America’s most romantic city still in tatters, when Skip Henderson, an old friend of Jacobson’s, purchases an item at a rummage sale: a very strange looking and oddly textured lampshade. When he asks what it’s made of, the seller, a man covered with jailhouse tattoos, replies, “That’s made from the skin of Jews.” The price: $35. A few days later, Henderson sends the lampshade to Jacobson, saying, “You’re the journalist, you find out what it is.” The lampshade couldn’t possibly be real, could it? But it is. DNA analysis proves it. This revelation sends Jacobson halfway around the world, to Yad Vashem in Jerusalem and to the Buchenwald concentration camp in Germany, where the lampshades were supposedly made on the order of the infamous “Bitch of Buchenwald,” Ilse Koch. From the time he grew up in Queens, New York, in the 1950s, Jacobson has heard stories about the human skin lampshade and knew it to be the ultimate symbol of Nazi cruelty. Now he has one of these things in his house with a DNA report to prove it, and almost everything he finds out about it is contradictory, mysterious, shot through with legend and specious information. Through interviews with forensic experts, famous Holocaust scholars (and deniers), Buchenwald survivors and liberators, and New Orleans thieves and cops, Jacobson gradually comes to see the lampshade as a ghostly illuminator of his own existential status as a Jew, and to understand exactly what that means in the context of human responsibility. One question looms as his search goes on: what to do with the lampshade—this unsettling thing that used to be someone? It is a difficult dilemma to be sure, but far from the last one, since once a lampshade of human skin enters your life, it is very, very hard to forget.
The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley
Author: Hannah Tinti
Publisher: Dial Press
ISBN: 0812989899
Pages: 416
Year: 2017-03-28
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“A gripping American-on-the-run thriller . . . a brilliant coming-of-age tale and a touching exploration of father-daughter relationships.”—Newsweek “One part Quentin Tarantino, one part Scheherazade, and twelve parts wild innovation.”—Ann Patchett, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Commonwealth NATIONAL BESTSELLER • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY NPR • The Washington Post • Paste Samuel Hawley isn’t like the other fathers in Olympus, Massachusetts. A loner who spent years living on the run, he raised his beloved daughter, Loo, on the road, moving from motel to motel, always watching his back. Now that Loo’s a teenager, Hawley wants only to give her a normal life. In his late wife’s hometown, he finds work as a fisherman, while Loo struggles to fit in at the local high school. Growing more and more curious about the mother she never knew, Loo begins to investigate. Soon, everywhere she turns, she encounters the mysteries of her parents’ lives before she was born. This hidden past is made all the more real by the twelve scars her father carries on his body. Each scar is from a bullet Hawley took over the course of his criminal career. Each is a memory: of another place on the map, another thrilling close call, another moment of love lost and found. As Loo uncovers a history that’s darker than she could have known, the demons of her father’s past spill over into the present—and together both Hawley and Loo must face a reckoning yet to come. Praise for The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley “A master class in literary suspense.”—The Washington Post “Tinti depicts brutality and compassion with exquisite sensitivity, creating a powerful overlay of love and pain.”—The New Yorker “Hannah Tinti’s beautifully constructed second novel . . . uses the scars on Hawley’s body—all twelve bullet wounds, one by one—to show who he is, what he’s done, and why the past chases and clings to him with such tenacity.”—The Boston Globe “The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley is an adventure epic with the deeper resonance of myth. . . . Tinti exhibits an aptitude for shining a piercing light into the corners of her characters’ hearts and minds.”—O: The Oprah Magazine

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