Orca How We Came To Know And Love The Oceans Greatest Predator Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Orca
Author: Jason Michael Colby, Jason M. Colby
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190673095
Pages: 408
Year: 2018-05-08
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Since the release of the documentary Blackfish in 2013, millions around the world have focused on the plight of the orca, the most profitable and controversial display animal in history. Yet, until now, no historical account has explained how we came to care about killer whales in the first place. Drawing on interviews, official records, private archives, and his own family history, Jason M. Colby tells the exhilarating and often heartbreaking story of how people came to love the ocean's greatest predator. Historically reviled as dangerous pests, killer whales were dying by the hundreds, even thousands, by the 1950s--the victims of whalers, fishermen, and even the US military. In the Pacific Northwest, fishermen shot them, scientists harpooned them, and the Canadian government mounted a machine gun to eliminate them. But that all changed in 1965, when Seattle entrepreneur Ted Griffin became the first person to swim and perform with a captive killer whale. The show proved wildly popular, and he began capturing and selling others, including Sea World's first Shamu. Over the following decade, live display transformed views of Orcinus orca. The public embraced killer whales as charismatic and friendly, while scientists enjoyed their first access to live orcas. In the Pacific Northwest, these captive encounters reshaped regional values and helped drive environmental activism, including Greenpeace's anti-whaling campaigns. Yet even as Northwesterners taught the world to love whales, they came to oppose their captivity and to fight for the freedom of a marine predator that had become a regional icon. This is the definitive history of how the feared and despised "killer" became the beloved "orca"--and what that has meant for our relationship with the ocean and its creatures.
Orca
Author: Jason M. Colby
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190673109
Pages: 368
Year: 2018-05-01
View: 939
Read: 902
Since the release of the documentary Blackfish in 2013, millions around the world have focused on the plight of the orca, the most profitable and controversial display animal in history. Yet, until now, no historical account has explained how we came to care about killer whales in the first place. Drawing on interviews, official records, private archives, and his own family history, Jason M. Colby tells the exhilarating and often heartbreaking story of how people came to love the ocean's greatest predator. Historically reviled as dangerous pests, killer whales were dying by the hundreds, even thousands, by the 1950s--the victims of whalers, fishermen, and even the US military. In the Pacific Northwest, fishermen shot them, scientists harpooned them, and the Canadian government mounted a machine gun to eliminate them. But that all changed in 1965, when Seattle entrepreneur Ted Griffin became the first person to swim and perform with a captive killer whale. The show proved wildly popular, and he began capturing and selling others, including Sea World's first Shamu. Over the following decade, live display transformed views of Orcinus orca. The public embraced killer whales as charismatic and friendly, while scientists enjoyed their first access to live orcas. In the Pacific Northwest, these captive encounters reshaped regional values and helped drive environmental activism, including Greenpeace's anti-whaling campaigns. Yet even as Northwesterners taught the world to love whales, they came to oppose their captivity and to fight for the freedom of a marine predator that had become a regional icon. This is the definitive history of how the feared and despised "killer" became the beloved "orca"--and what that has meant for our relationship with the ocean and its creatures.
Orca
Author: Jason M. Colby
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190673117
Pages: 368
Year: 2018-05-01
View: 884
Read: 191
Since the release of the documentary Blackfish in 2013, millions around the world have focused on the plight of the orca, the most profitable and controversial display animal in history. Yet, until now, no historical account has explained how we came to care about killer whales in the first place. Drawing on interviews, official records, private archives, and his own family history, Jason M. Colby tells the exhilarating and often heartbreaking story of how people came to love the ocean's greatest predator. Historically reviled as dangerous pests, killer whales were dying by the hundreds, even thousands, by the 1950s--the victims of whalers, fishermen, and even the US military. In the Pacific Northwest, fishermen shot them, scientists harpooned them, and the Canadian government mounted a machine gun to eliminate them. But that all changed in 1965, when Seattle entrepreneur Ted Griffin became the first person to swim and perform with a captive killer whale. The show proved wildly popular, and he began capturing and selling others, including Sea World's first Shamu. Over the following decade, live display transformed views of Orcinus orca. The public embraced killer whales as charismatic and friendly, while scientists enjoyed their first access to live orcas. In the Pacific Northwest, these captive encounters reshaped regional values and helped drive environmental activism, including Greenpeace's anti-whaling campaigns. Yet even as Northwesterners taught the world to love whales, they came to oppose their captivity and to fight for the freedom of a marine predator that had become a regional icon. This is the definitive history of how the feared and despised "killer" became the beloved "orca"--and what that has meant for our relationship with the ocean and its creatures.
Orca
Author: Peter Knudtson, David Suzuki
Publisher:
ISBN: 1553650344
Pages: 110
Year: 1996
View: 345
Read: 271
The orca, also known as the killer whale, is one of the most intriguing and mysterious animals in the world. This lavishly illustrated portrait of this almost mythical sea mammal offers visions of the orca throughout the ages and across cultures, describing its hunting techniques and refined sonar and communication abilities. Full-color photographs capture whales breaching, playing, hunting, and caring for their young. The book also discusses the ethics of captivity and the environmental threats to whale populations. A foreword by internationally acclaimed scientist and environmentalist David Suzuki is included.
Killer Whales
Author: Michael A Bigg
Publisher: Nanaimo, B.C. : Phantom
ISBN:
Pages: 79
Year: 1987
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Listening to Whales
Author: Alexandra Morton
Publisher: Ballantine Books
ISBN: 0307487547
Pages: 320
Year: 2008-12-30
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Read: 242
In Listening to Whales, Alexandra Morton shares spellbinding stories about her career in whale and dolphin research and what she has learned from and about these magnificent mammals. In the late 1970s, while working at Marineland in California, Alexandra pioneered the recording of orca sounds by dropping a hydrophone into the tank of two killer whales. She recorded the varied language of mating, childbirth, and even grief after the birth of a stillborn calf. At the same time she made the startling observation that the whales were inventing wonderful synchronized movements, a behavior that was soon recognized as a defining characteristic of orca society. In 1984, Alexandra moved to a remote bay in British Columbia to continue her research with wild orcas. Her recordings of the whales have led her to a deeper understanding of the mystery of whale echolocation, the vocal communication that enables the mammals to find their way in the dark sea. A fascinating study of the profound communion between humans and whales, this book will open your eyes anew to the wonders of the natural world. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Wild Orca
Author: Brenda Peterson
Publisher: Henry Holt and Company (BYR)
ISBN: 1250224128
Pages: 40
Year: 2018-09-18
View: 364
Read: 1166
A picture book homage to Granny, the world’s oldest known orca, who lived to be 105 years old! For animal lovers and future environmentalists. “Will Granny and her family come again this year?” Dark fins slice through whitecaps, heading straight toward shore. Told from the perspective of young Mia and her family on a whale-watching excursion in the San Juan Islands, here is a moving homage to Granny, the world’s oldest known orca. This intimate and informative story celebrates the importance of respecting and protecting wildlife. It also sheds light on communication and family connections in both human and orca communities, all while answering essential questions about how these intelligent animals live. A Christy Ottaviano Book
Of Orcas and Men: What Killer Whales Can Teach Us
Author: David Neiwert
Publisher: The Overlook Press
ISBN: 1468312294
Pages: 320
Year: 2015-06-16
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A celebrated journalist’s eye-opening history of orcas, and an exploration of their relationship with human beings--a must-read for anyone who's ever been moved by these remarkable creatures Orcas are one of earth’s most intelligent animals. Benign and gentle, with their own languages and cultures, orcas’ amazing capacity for long-term memory and, arguably, compassion, makes the ugly story of the captive-orca industry especially damning. In Of Orcas and Men, a marvelously compelling mix of cultural history, environmental reporting, and scientific research, David Neiwert explores how this extraordinary species has come to capture our imaginations—and the catastrophic environmental consequences of that appeal. In the tradition of Barry Lopez’s classic Of Wolves and Men, David Neiwert’s book is a powerful tribute to one of the animal kingdom’s most remarkable members.
Spying on Whales
Author: Nick Pyenson
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0735224579
Pages: 336
Year: 2018-06-26
View: 713
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A dive into the secret lives of whales, from their evolutionary past to today's cutting edge of science Whales are among the largest, most intelligent, deepest diving species to have ever lived on our planet. They evolved from land-roaming, dog-sized creatures into animals that move like fish, breathe like us, can grow to 300,000 pounds, live 200 years and travel entire ocean basins. Whales fill us with terror, awe, and affection--yet there is still so much we don't know about them. Why did it take whales over 50 million years to evolve to such big sizes, and how do they eat enough to stay that big? How did their ancestors return from land to the sea--and what can their lives tell us about evolution as a whole? Importantly, in the sweepstakes of human-driven habitat and climate change, will whales survive? Nick Pyenson's research has given us the answers to some of our biggest questions about whales. He takes us deep inside the Smithsonian's unparalleled fossil collections, to frigid Antarctic waters, and to the arid desert in Chile, where scientists race against time to document the largest fossil whale site ever found. Full of rich storytelling and scientific discovery, Spying on Whales spans the ancient past to an uncertain future--all to better understand the most enigmatic creatures on Earth.
Swimming with Orca
Author: Ingrid Visser
Publisher: Penguin Global
ISBN: 014301983X
Pages: 240
Year: 2006-04
View: 472
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Meet the woman whose life revolves around orca, or killer whales. This book tells the fascinating story of Dr Ingrid Visser, a marine scientist who has spent the past ten years studying these creatures. During this time she has got to know many New Zealand orca intimately; she calls them her friends and can identify some by sight. Ingrid has a hands-on approach to her study - getting into the water with them, watching them hunt and interacting in any way she can. Ingrid is the only person to work with orca in the South Pacific and has discovered many differences between their behaviour here and in the northern hemisphere. The book is packed with interesting facts about orca in New Zealand and also tells Ingrid's own personal story and the inspiring encounters she has had with these intriguing animals.
Killer Whales of the World
Author: Robert W. Baird, Robin W. Baird
Publisher: Voyageur Press
ISBN: 0760326541
Pages: 132
Year: 2006
View: 264
Read: 937
An in-depth introduction to a popular species of marine mammal and the various habitats in which it can be found. Annotation. Killer Whales of the World is an in-depth introduction to a ubiquitous, easily recognized, and popular species of marine mammal. Those interested in marine biology, marine animals, coastal conservation issues and animal lovers in general are sure to appreciate this book. This comprehensive and highly informative book explains the origin of the name "Killer Whale," where they can be found, their traveling behaviors and feeding habits, and some of the threats they face as a species. It also examines this well-known whale's place in popular culture. For those who just cannot seem to get enough of this hugely popular mammal, the book offers places to find additional information about killer whales and also gives some locations where readers can go to see the animal first hand. Annotation. Baird, a US biologist expert on killer whales (aka: orcas), helped relocate Keiko (of fame) to Iceland. He presents facts and research on these Cetaceans, where to see them, a conservation case study, and current thinking on whether there is more than one species. Includes color photos, distribution maps, and websites for further information. Oversize landscape format. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Operation Orca
Author: Daniel Francis, Gil Hewlett
Publisher: Harbour Publishing Company
ISBN:
Pages: 280
Year: 2007
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Killer whales once had a reputation that was even fiercer than their name. But in 1964 the Vancouver Aquarium obtained its first killer whale, Moby Doll, and discovered that they were not the vicious man-eaters of legend. In January 2002, scientists reunited "Springer," a young orphaned whale found in Puget Sound, with her family in BC. At the same time another lone whale turned up on the west coast of Vancouver Island. The people of Nootka Sound adopted "Luna" as their own. Another rescue was planned to return Luna to his family but this time there so no happy ending. In OPERATION ORCA, award-winning author Daniel Francis gives breadth to the political debate of whether to interfere or let nature take its course.
Namu, quest for the killer whale
Author: Ted Griffin, Val Paul Taylor
Publisher: Gryphon West Pub
ISBN: 0943482003
Pages: 237
Year: 1982-10
View: 959
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When the Last Lion Roars
Author: Sara Evans
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1472916115
Pages: 320
Year: 2018-06-14
View: 898
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The illegal killing of Cecil – a famous and magnificent black-maned Zimbabwean lion – by an American big-game hunter in 2015 sparked international outrage. More significantly, it drew the world's attention to the devastating plight of Africa's lions. A century ago, there were more than 200,000 wild lions living in Africa. Today, with that population reduced by more than 90 per cent, many experts believe that without effective conservation plans, Africa's remaining wild lions could be completely wiped out by the mid-half of this century. When the Last Lion Roars explores the historic rise and fall of the lion as a global species, and examines the reasons behind its catastrophic decline. Interwoven with vivid personal encounters of Africa's last lions, Sara Evans questions what is being done to reverse (or at least stem) this population collapse, and she considers the importance of human responsibility in this decline and, more crucially, in their conservation. From the Lion Guardians in Kenya to the Living Walls of Tanzania, and the Hwange Lion Research Project in Zimbabwe, Sara meets both lions and their champions, people who are fighting to bring this iconic species back from the brink of extinction.
Puget Sound Whales for Sale
Author: Sandra Pollard
Publisher: History Press
ISBN: 1626196028
Pages: 192
Year: 2014-06-24
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In November 2005, Washington's iconic killer whales, known as Southern Resident orcas, were placed on the endangered species list. It was a victory long overdue for a fragile population of fewer than one hundred whales. Author and certified marine naturalist Sandra Pollard traces the story and destinies of the many Southern Resident orcas captured for commercial purposes in or near the Puget Sound between 1964 and 1976. During this time, these highly intelligent members of the dolphin family lost nearly one-third of their population. Drawing on original archive material, this important volume outlines the history of orca captivity while also recounting the harrowing struggle--and ultimate triumph--for the Puget Sound orcas' freedom.

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