New Zealand Slavonic Journal Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

New Zealand Slavonic Journal
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Year: 2008
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Turgenev and England
Author: Patrick Waddington
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1349034312
Pages: 382
Year: 1980-06-18
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Reference Guide to Russian Literature
Author: Neil Cornwell, Nicole Christian
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1884964109
Pages: 972
Year: 1998-01-01
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"This guide provides informative essays and selective bibliographies on the main writers of Russian for students and general readers. Covering all of Russian literature, this handbook emphasizes 19th- and 20th-century authors. The guide uses the Western alphabet, so anonymous works appear under their English title and are interfiled in alphabetical order with author entries. Entries for writers include a brief biography, a list of the writer's primary works in chronological order, a selected list of bibliographies, and critical studies. The guide begins with 13 detailed essays that cover most periods, topics, and genres of Russian literature. This reference source belongs in all libraries with large literature collections".--"Outstanding Reference Sources : the 1999 Selection of New Titles", American Libraries, May 1999. Comp. by the Reference Sources Committee, RUSA, ALA.
Russia's Greatest Enemy?
Author: Charlotte Alston
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 0857716581
Pages: 278
Year: 2007-03-30
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A remarkably talented linguist, foreign correspondant in Russia from 1904-1921 and Foreign Editor for 'The Times', 'Russia's Greatest Enemy?' traces the fascinating life and career of Harold Williams. This quiet and modest New Zealander played a central role in informing and influencing British opinion on Russia from the twilight of the Tsars, through War and Revolution, to the rise of the Soviet Union. The career of this keen Russophile and fierce opponent of Bolshevism illuminates the pre-World War One movement towards rapprochement with the Tsar, as well as the drive for intervention and isolation in the Soviet period. In this fascinating study Charlotte Alston explores the role of Williams as the interpreter of Russia to the British and the British to Russia in this turbulent period in the history of both countries _x000D_ _x000D_ Introduction_x000D_ 1. New Zealand, 1876-1900_x000D_ 2. Journalism, 1900-1914_x000D_ 3. Britain, Russia, War and Revolution, 1907-1917_x000D_ 4. From Revolution to Intervention, 1917-1921_x000D_ 5. The Times, 1921-1928_x000D_ Conclusion_x000D_ Bibliography
D.S. Mirsky
Author: Gerald Stanton Smith
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 0198160062
Pages: 398
Year: 2000
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This is the first biography in any language of 'Comrade Prince' D. S. Mirsky (1890-1939), who uniquely participated in three distinctive episodes of modern European culture. In late imperial St Petersburg he was a poet, a student of Oriental languages and ancient history, and also a Guards officer. After fighting in World War I and the Russian Civil War, Mirsky emigrated, taught at London University, and became a literary critic and historian, writing prolifically in English, and also inRussian for the Paris-centred emigration, especially as a leading member of the Eurasian movement. His closest literary relationships were with Marina Tsvetaeva and Aleksei Remizov, and later with Maksim Gorky. In 1926-7 he published A History of Russian Literature, written in English, which remains the standard introduction to the subject. While in London he lived in Bloomsbury and knew the Woolfs; he also knew T. S. Eliot, and was the first Russian critic to write about him. Mirsky became aCommunist in 1931 and returned to Stalin's Moscow the following year, becoming a prominent Soviet critic, and in particular championing Boris Pasternak. In 1937 he was arrested, and died in the Gulag. This biography draws on much unpublished material, including Mirsky's NKVD files.
From Pushkin to Palisandriia
Author: Arnold McMillin
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 134921065X
Pages: 255
Year: 1990-10-24
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The Russians and Australia
Author: Glynn Barratt
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 0774843160
Pages: 347
Year: 2011-11-01
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Known for his pioneering work on Russia's early exploits in Australia and the Pacific, historian Glynn Barratt again breaks new ground in presenting the first comprehensive study of Russian naval, social, mercantile, and scientific enterprise in New South Wales between 1807 and 1835.
Stalin
Author: Stephen Kotkin
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0698170105
Pages: 976
Year: 2014-11-06
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A magnificent new biography that revolutionizes our understanding of Stalin and his world It has the quality of myth: a poor cobbler’s son, a seminarian from an oppressed outer province of the Russian empire, reinvents himself as a top leader in a band of revolutionary zealots. When the band seizes control of the country in the aftermath of total world war, the former seminarian ruthlessly dominates the new regime until he stands as absolute ruler of a vast and terrible state apparatus, with dominion over Eurasia. While still building his power base within the Bolshevik dictatorship, he embarks upon the greatest gamble of his political life and the largest program of social reengineering ever attempted: the collectivization of all agriculture and industry across one sixth of the earth. Millions will die, and many more millions will suffer, but the man will push through to the end against all resistance and doubts. Where did such power come from? In Stalin, Stephen Kotkin offers a biography that, at long last, is equal to this shrewd, sociopathic, charismatic dictator in all his dimensions. The character of Stalin emerges as both astute and blinkered, cynical and true believing, people oriented and vicious, canny enough to see through people but prone to nonsensical beliefs. We see a man inclined to despotism who could be utterly charming, a pragmatic ideologue, a leader who obsessed over slights yet was a precocious geostrategic thinker—unique among Bolsheviks—and yet who made egregious strategic blunders. Through it all, we see Stalin’s unflinching persistence, his sheer force of will—perhaps the ultimate key to understanding his indelible mark on history. Stalin gives an intimate view of the Bolshevik regime’s inner geography of power, bringing to the fore fresh materials from Soviet military intelligence and the secret police. Kotkin rejects the inherited wisdom about Stalin’s psychological makeup, showing us instead how Stalin’s near paranoia was fundamentally political, and closely tracks the Bolshevik revolution’s structural paranoia, the predicament of a Communist regime in an overwhelmingly capitalist world, surrounded and penetrated by enemies. At the same time, Kotkin demonstrates the impossibility of understanding Stalin’s momentous decisions outside of the context of the tragic history of imperial Russia. The product of a decade of intrepid research, Stalin is a landmark achievement, a work that recasts the way we think about the Soviet Union, revolution, dictatorship, the twentieth century, and indeed the art of history itself. Stalin: Waiting for Hitler, 1929-1941 will be published by Penguin Press in October 2017
Stalking Nabokov
Author: Brian Boyd
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231530293
Pages: 488
Year: 2011-11-08
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At the age of twenty-one, Brian Boyd wrote a thesis on Vladimir Nabokov that the famous author called "brilliant." After gaining exclusive access to the writer's archives, he wrote a two-part, award-winning biography, Vladimir Nabokov: The Russian Years (1990) and Vladimir Nabokov: The American Years (1991). This collection features essays written by Boyd since completing the biography, incorporating material he gleaned from his research as well as new discoveries and formulations. Boyd confronts Nabokov's life, career, and legacy; his art, science, and thought; his subtle humor and puzzle-like storytelling; his complex psychological portraits; and his inheritance from, reworking of, and affinities with Shakespeare, Pushkin, Tolstoy, and Machado de Assis. Boyd offers new ways of reading Nabokov's best English-language works: Lolita, Pale Fire, Ada, and the unparalleled autobiography, Speak, Memory, and he discloses otherwise unknown information about the author's world. Sharing his personal reflections, Boyd recounts the adventures, hardships, and revelations of researching Nabokov's biography and his unusual finds in the archives, including materials still awaiting publication. The first to focus on Nabokov's metaphysics, Boyd cautions against their being used as the key to unlock all of the author's secrets, showing instead the many other rooms in Nabokov's castle of fiction that need exploring, such as his humor, narrative invention, and psychological insight into characters and readers alike. Appreciating Nabokov as novelist, memoirist, poet, translator, scientist, and individual, Boyd helps us understand more than ever the author's multifaceted genius.
Alexander Pushkin
Author: A. D. P. Briggs
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 0389203408
Pages: 257
Year: 1983
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A clear, detailed and accessible account of all Pushkin's poetry
Russian Postmodernism
Author: Mikhail N. Epstein, Alexander A. Genis, Slobodanka Vladiv-Glover
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 1782388648
Pages: 579
Year: 2015-12-15
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Recent decades have been decisive for Russia not only politically but culturally as well. The end of the Cold War has enabled Russia to take part in the global rise and crystallization of postmodernism. This volume investigates the manifestations of this crucial trend in Russian fiction, poetry, art, and spirituality, demonstrating how Russian postmodernism is its own unique entity. It offers a point of departure and valuable guide to an area of contemporary literary-cultural studies insufficiently represented in English-language scholarship. This second edition includes additional essays on the topic and a new introduction examining the most recent developments.
Fathers and Sons
Author: Ivan Sergeevich Turgenev, Richard Freeborn
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0192833928
Pages: 261
Year: 1998
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Fathers and Sons is one of the greatest nineteenth century Russian novels, and has long been acclaimed as Turgenev's finest work. It is a political novel set in a domestic context, with a universal theme, the generational divide between fathers and sons. Set in 1859 at the moment when the Russian autocratic state began to move hesitantly towards social and political reform, the novel explores the conflict between the liberal-minded fathers of Russian reformist sympathies and their free-thinking intellectual sons whose revolutionary ideology threatened the stability of the state.
Australian Slavonic and East European Studies
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Year: 2008
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Marked Women
Author: Russell Campbell
Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press
ISBN: 029921253X
Pages: 464
Year: 2006-04-05
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Julia Roberts played a prostitute, famously, in Pretty Woman. So did Jodie Foster in Taxi Driver, Jane Fonda in Klute, Anna Karina in Vivre sa vie, Greta Garbo in Anna Christie, and Charlize Theron, who won an Academy Award for Monster. This engaging and generously illustrated study explores the depiction of female prostitute characters and prostitution in world cinema, from the silent era to the present-day industry. From the woman with control over her own destiny to the woman who cannot get away from her pimp, Russell Campbell shows the diverse representations of prostitutes in film. Marked Women classifies fifteen recurrent character types and three common narratives, many of them with their roots in male fantasy. The “Happy Hooker,” for example, is the liberated woman whose only goal is to give as much pleasure as she receives, while the “Avenger,” a nightmare of the male imagination, represents the threat of women taking retribution for all the oppression they have suffered at the hands of men. The “Love Story,” a common narrative, represents the prostitute as both heroine and anti-heroine, while “Condemned to Death” allows men to manifest, in imagination only, their hostility toward women by killing off the troubled prostitute in an act of cathartic violence. The figure of the woman whose body is available at a price has fascinated and intrigued filmmakers and filmgoers since the very beginning of cinema, but the manner of representation has also been highly conflicted and fiercely contested. Campbell explores the cinematic prostitute as a figure shaped by both reactionary thought and feminist challenges to the norm, demonstrating how the film industry itself is split by fascinating contradictions.
The Ridiculous Jew
Author: Gary Rosenshield
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804769850
Pages: 264
Year: 2008-09-25
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This book is a study devoted to exploring the use of a Russian version of the Jewish stereotype (the ridiculous Jew) in the works of three of the greatest writers of the nineteenth century. Rosenshield does not attempt to expose the stereotype—which was self-consciously and unashamedly employed. Rather, he examines how stereotypes are used to further the very different artistic, cultural, and ideological agendas of each writer. What distinguishes this book from others is that it explores the problems that arise when an ethnic stereotype is so fully incorporated into a work of art that it takes on a life of its own, often undermining the intentions of its author as well as many of the defining elements of the stereotype itself. With each these writers, the Jewish stereotype precipitates a literary transformation, taking their work into an uncomfortable space for the author and a challenging one for readers.

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