Monster Fire At Minong Wisconsins Five Mile Tower Fire Of 1977 Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Monster Fire at Minong
Author: Bill Matthias
Publisher: Wisconsin Historical Society
ISBN: 0870204726
Pages: 192
Year: 2010-09-15
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Ignited by a single match on April 30, 1977, the Five Mile Tower Fire raged out of control for 17 hours. It would be one of the largest wildland fires in Wisconsin history, ultimately destroying more than 13,000 acres of land and 63 buildings. As a column of black pine smoke reached high in the sky, citizens from Minong, Chicog, Webster, Gordon, Wascott, Hayward, Spooner, Solon Springs, and other communities began showing up to help. The grassy field designated as fire headquarters quickly became a hub of activity, jammed with trucks, school buses, dozers on trailers, dump trucks, tanker trucks, fuel trucks, and hundreds of people waiting to sign in. More than 900 came in the first four hours, clogging the road with traffic in both directions. Headquarters personnel worked valiantly to coordinate citizens and DNR workers in a buildup of people and equipment unprecedented in the history of Wisconsin firefighting. Based on his own experiences during the long battle, plus dozens of interviews and other eyewitness accounts, Bill Matthias presents an in-depth look at the Five Mile Tower Fire, the brave citizens who helped fight it, and the important changes made to firefighting laws and procedures in its aftermath.
Wisconsin Magazine of History
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Publisher:
ISBN:
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Year: 2009
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The Great Peshtigo Fire
Author: Peter Pernin
Publisher: Wisconsin Historical Society
ISBN: 0870206842
Pages: 64
Year: 2014-10-30
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Reverend Peter Pernin was the parish priest for Peshtigo and nearby Marinette, whose churches burned to the ground. He published his account of the fire in 1874. The late William Converse Haygood served as editor of the Wisconsin Magazine of History from 1957 to 1975. He prepared this version of Father Pernin's account on the occasion of the Peshtigo Fire's centennial in 1971. Foreword writer Stephen J. Pyne is a professor at Arizona State University in Tempe and author of numerous books on wildland fire, including Fire in America.
The Great Peshtigo Fire
Author: Scott Knickelbine
Publisher: Wisconsin Historical Society
ISBN: 0870206028
Pages: 80
Year: 2012-08-29
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On the night of October 8, 1871, a whirlwind of fire swept through northeastern Wisconsin, destroying the bustling frontier town of Peshtigo. Trees, buildings, and people burst into flames. Metal melted. Sand turned into glass. People thought the end of the world had come. When the “tornado of fire” was over, 2,500 people were dead, and Peshtigo was nothing but a smoking ruin. It was the deadliest wildfire in U.S. history. The Great Peshtigo Fire: Stories and Science from America’s Deadliest Firestorm explores the history, science, and legacy of the 1871 Peshtigo Fire at a fourth-grade reading level. Readers will learn about the history of settlement, agriculture, and forestry in 19th-century Wisconsin. This illuminating text covers a diverse range of topics that will enrich the reader’s understanding of the Peshtigo Fire, including the building and land-use practices of the time that made the area ripe for such a fire, the weather patterns that fostered widespread fires throughout the upper Midwest in the summer and fall of 1871, and exciting first-person accounts that vividly bring the `victims’ stories to life. Connections made between the Peshtigo Fire and the history of fire prevention in the United States encourage critical thinking about issues that remain controversial to this day, such as planned burns and housing development restrictions near forested areas. The Great Peshtigo Fire: Stories and Science from America’s Deadliest Firestorm will inform and captivate its readers as it journeys through the horrifying history of the Peshtigo Fire.
Certain Victory
Author: Robert H. Scales
Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.
ISBN: 1612340776
Pages: 435
Year: 1998-02-27
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A balanced, comprehensive account of the largest armored battle since World War II
"A Good Man is Hard to Find"
Author: Flannery O'Connor
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813519772
Pages: 180
Year: 1993
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Presents a chronology of the life of author Flannery O'Conner, comments and letters by the author about the story, and a series of ten critical essays by noted authors about her work.
Dressing for Altitude
Author: Dennis R. Jenkins
Publisher: Government Printing Office
ISBN: 0160901103
Pages: 526
Year: 2012
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Crossing the Rubicon
Author: Michael C. Ruppert
Publisher: New Society Publishers
ISBN: 1550923188
Pages: 512
Year: 2013-10-18
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The long-awaited expose of 9/11 and Peak Oil - by the "Godfather of 9/11 research."
A century of innovation
Author: Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company
Publisher:
ISBN: 0972230211
Pages: 236
Year: 2002
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A compilation of 3M voices, memories, facts and experiences from the company's first 100 years.
When Old Technologies Were New
Author: Carolyn Marvin
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198021380
Pages: 296
Year: 1990-05-24
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In the history of electronic communication, the last quarter of the nineteenth century holds a special place, for it was during this period that the telephone, phonograph, electric light, wireless, and cinema were all invented. In When old Technologies Were New, Carolyn Marvin explores how two of these new inventions--the telephone and the electric light--were publicly envisioned at the end of the nineteenth century, as seen in specialized engineering journals and popular media. Marvin pays particular attention to the telephone, describing how it disrupted established social relations, unsettling customary ways of dividing the private person and family from the more public setting of the community. On the lighter side, she describes how people spoke louder when calling long distance, and how they worried about catching contagious diseases over the phone. A particularly powerful chapter deals with telephonic precursors of radio broadcasting--the "Telephone Herald" in New York and the "Telefon Hirmondo" of Hungary--and the conflict between the technological development of broadcasting and the attempt to impose a homogenous, ethnocentric variant of Anglo-Saxon culture on the public. While focusing on the way professionals in the electronics field tried to control the new media, Marvin also illuminates the broader social impact, presenting a wide-ranging, informative, and entertaining account of the early years of electronic media.
Encyclopedia of Disasters
Author: Angus Macleod Gunn
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 0313087474
Pages: 733
Year: 2007-12-30
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Provides an accessible introduction to the most important disasters - both natural and human caused - throughout human history
The Canneries, Cabins, and Caches of Bristol Bay, Alaska
Author: John B. Branson
Publisher: Department of Interior National Park Service Lake Clark National Park & Preserve
ISBN: 097964321X
Pages: 264
Year: 2007
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The Unspoken Alliance
Author: Sasha Polakow-Suransky
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307379256
Pages: 352
Year: 2010-05-25
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A revealing account of how Israel’s booming arms industry and apartheid South Africa’s international isolation led to a secretive military partnership between two seemingly unlikely allies. Prior to the Six-Day War, Israel was a darling of the international left: socialist idealists like David Ben-Gurion and Golda Meir vocally opposed apartheid and built alliances with black leaders in newly independent African nations. South Africa, for its part, was controlled by a regime of Afrikaner nationalists who had enthusiastically supported Hitler during World War II. But after Israel’s occupation of Palestinian territories in 1967, the country found itself estranged from former allies and threatened anew by old enemies. As both states became international pariahs, their covert military relationship blossomed: they exchanged billions of dollars’ worth of extremely sensitive material, including nuclear technology, boosting Israel’s sagging economy and strengthening the beleaguered apartheid regime. By the time the right-wing Likud Party came to power in 1977, Israel had all but abandoned the moralism of its founders in favor of close and lucrative ties with South Africa. For nearly twenty years, Israel denied these ties, claiming that it opposed apartheid on moral and religious grounds even as it secretly supplied the arsenal of a white supremacist government. Sasha Polakow-Suransky reveals the previously classified details of countless arms deals conducted behind the backs of Israel’s own diplomatic corps and in violation of a United Nations arms embargo. Based on extensive archival research and exclusive interviews with former generals and high-level government officials in both countries, The Unspoken Alliance tells a troubling story of Cold War paranoia, moral compromises, and Israel’s estrangement from the left. It is essential reading for anyone interested in Israel’s history and its future. From the Hardcover edition.
Living with Lead
Author: Bradley D. Snow
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press
ISBN: 082298279X
Pages: 272
Year: 2017-07-31
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The Coeur d’Alenes, a twenty-five by ten mile portion of the Idaho Panhandle, is home to one of the most productive mining districts in world history. Historically the globe’s richest silver district and also one of the nation’s biggest lead and zinc producers, the Coeur d’Alenes’ legacy also includes environmental pollution on an epic scale. For decades local waters were fouled with tailings from the mining district’s more than one hundred mines and mills and the air surrounding Kellogg, Idaho was laced with lead and other toxic heavy metals issuing from the Bunker Hill Company’s smelter. The same industrial processes that damaged the environment and harmed human health, however, also provided economic sustenance to thousands of local residents and a string of proud, working-class communities. Living with Lead endeavors to untangle the costs and benefits of a century of mining, milling, and smelting in a small western city and the region that surrounds it.
Mining and Communities in Northern Canada
Author: Arn Keeling, John Sandlos
Publisher:
ISBN: 1552388042
Pages: 456
Year: 2015-11-25
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This collection examines historical and contemporary social, economic, and environmental impacts of mining on Aboriginal communities in northern Canada. Combining oral history research with intensive archival study, this work juxtaposes the perspectives of government and industry with the perspectives of local communities. CONTRIBUTORS: Patricia Boulter, Jean-Sebastien Boutet, Emilie Cameron, Sarah Gordon, Heather Green, Jane Hammond, Joella Hogan, Arn Keeling, Tyler Levitan, Hereward Longley, Scott Midgley, Kevin O Reilly, Andrea Procter, John Sandlos, and Alexandra Winton."

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