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Louisiana
Author: Bennett H. Wall, John C. Rodrigue
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118619641
Pages: 520
Year: 2013-11-19
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Covering the lively, even raucous, history of Louisiana from before First Contact through the Elections of 2012, this sixth edition of the classic Louisiana history survey provides an engaging and comprehensive narrative of what is arguably America’s most colorful state. Since the appearance of the first edition of this classic text in 1984, Louisiana: A History has remained the best-loved and most highly regarded college-level survey of Louisiana on the market Compiled by some of the foremost experts in the field of Louisiana history who combine their own research with recent historical discoveries Includes complete coverage of the most recent events in political and environmental history, including the continued aftermath of Katrina and the 2010 BP oil spill Considers the interrelationship between Louisiana history and that of the American South and the nation as a whole Written in an engaging and accessible style complemented by more than a hundred photographs and maps
Louisiana
Author: Light Townsend Cummins, Judith Kelleher Schafer, Edward F. Haas, Michael L. Kurtz
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118619293
Pages: 552
Year: 2014-01-28
View: 340
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Covering the lively, even raucous, history of Louisiana from before First Contact through the Elections of 2012, this sixth edition of the classic Louisiana history survey provides an engaging and comprehensive narrative of what is arguably America's most colorful state. Since the appearance of the first edition of this classic text in 1984, Louisiana: A History has remained the best-loved and most highly regarded college-level survey of Louisiana on the market Compiled by some of the foremost experts in the field of Louisiana history who combine their own research with recent historical discoveries Includes complete coverage of the most recent events in political and environmental history, including the continued aftermath of Katrina and the 2010 BP oil spill Considers the interrelationship between Louisiana history and that of the American South and the nation as a whole Written in an engaging and accessible style complemented by more than a hundred photographs and maps
Louisiana: A History
Author: Joe Gray Taylor
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393243745
Pages: 240
Year: 1984-05-17
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From the earliest colonists through the latest Mardi Gras, Louisiana has had a history as exotic as that of any state. Even its political corruption--extending from French governors for whom office was exploitable property through the "Louisiana Hayride" following the death of Huey Long--seems to have had a glamorous side. Handing the colony of Louisiana back and forth between their empires, the French and Spanish left a legacy that lives in such forms as the architecture of the Vieux Carre and a civil law deriving from the Napoleonic Code. Acadian refugees, German farmers, black slaves and free blacks, along with Italians, Irish, and the "Kaintucks" who helped Andrew Jackson win the Battle of New Orleans added to the state's distinctiveness. Made rich by sugar cane, cotton, and Mississippi River commerce before the Civil War, Louisiana faced poverty afterward. Battles between Bourbon Democrats and Reconstruction Republicans followed, ultimately involving the Custom House Ring and the Knights of the White Camelia. By methods that remain controversial, Huey Long ended "government by gentlemen" with economic transformations other had sought. Gas, oil, and industrialization have additionally "Americanized" the state. Something of Louisiana's historic joie de vivre remains, however, to the gratification of residents and visitors alike; both will enjoy Joe Gray Taylor's telling of the story.
Tirailleurs
Author: Thomas H. Richey
Publisher: iUniverse
ISBN: 0595272584
Pages: 336
Year: 2003
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The Tirailleurs was a company of soldiers from Brusly Landing, West Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana. They were mostly Acadians and fought gallantly for the Southern Cause. This book follows them through the Civil War and uses diaries, letters, and memoirs to allow the soldiers to tell their own story. From a bloodbath at Shiloh's Hornet's, Nest, we follow them through the terrible debacle at the Battle of Nashville. Tirailleurs is the first definitive history of the 4th Louisiana Infantry, CSA. Over sixteen hundred men served in the 4th LA and are all listed by company in the book s appendix making it an excellent genealogical resource.
Louisiana
Author:
Publisher: Pelican Publishing
ISBN: 1455607894
Pages:
Year:
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Africans in Colonial Louisiana
Author: Gwendolyn Midlo Hall
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 0807119997
Pages: 456
Year: 1995-07-01
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Although a number of important studies of American slavery have explored the formation of slave cultures in the English colonies, no book until now has undertaken a comprehensive assessment of the development of the distinctive Afro-Creole culture of colonial Louisiana. This culture, based upon a separate language community with its own folkloric, musical, religious, and historical traditions, was created by slaves brought directly from Africa to Louisiana before 1731. It still survives as the acknowledged cultural heritage of tens of thousands of people of all races in the southern part of the state. In this pathbreaking work, Gwendolyn Midlo Hall studies Louisiana's creole slave community during the eighteenth century, focusing on the slaves' African origins, the evolution of their own language and culture, and the role they played in the formation of the broader society, economy, and culture of the region. Hall bases her study on research in a wide range of archival sources in Louisiana, France, and Spain and employs several disciplines--history, anthropology, linguistics, and folklore--in her analysis. Among the topics she considers are the French slave trade from Africa to Louisiana, the ethnic origins of the slaves, and relations between African slaves and native Indians. She gives special consideration to race mixture between Africans, Indians, and whites; to the role of slaves in the Natchez Uprising of 1729; to slave unrest and conspiracies, including the Pointe Coupee conspiracies of 1791 and 1795; and to the development of communities of runaway slaves in the cypress swamps around New Orleans.
A History of French Louisiana
Author: Marcel Giraud
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 0807116092
Pages: 248
Year: 1993-04-01
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The death of Louis XIV in 1715 and the accession of his more progressive younger brother as Regent of France might have brought some hopeful changes to Louisiana, France's tiny, struggling outpost on the Gulf of Mexico. However, the continuation of the debilitating regime of the merchant Antoine Crozat and the extreme impoverishment of the French Treasury Following the disastrous wars of Louis XIV meant that no radical changes were possible. Instead, these few years at the beginning of the Regency represented a period of transition for the colony, when the need for a new administrative regime for Louisiana was met in France by a growing awareness of the strategic and economic potential of the Mississippi settlements. All of these conditions prepared the way for the appearance on the scene of the Company of the West in 1717. In his detailed survey of this brief but crucial period of Louisiana's history, Marcel Giraud assesses the new mood and conditions in France -- the personnel and objectives of the Council of the Navy, which oversaw the colony's administration; the advances in scientific opinion and their impact on Louisiana; and the political, fiscal, and economic conditions that created a new appreciation of the colony of official circles -- while describing actual conditions in the colony. Giraud portrays the Louisiana of 1715 as a few clusters of squalid buildings scattered along the Gulf Coast from Alabama to Natchitoches, inhabited by largely dispirited settlers and soldiers who for the most part lacked the barest necessities of life. Crozat's essentially self-serving regime made this a period of virtual stagnation. Rivalries among the colony's administrative personnel, especially between the governors and the Le Moyne family and their supporters, impeded development, as did the inadequacy of the priests sent to minister to the colony; the paucity of women, farmers, and skilled workers; and the infertile soil around the sties chosen for the forts and settlements. Relations with the indigenous populations were hindered by the lack of acceptable trade goods, as were efforts by the French colonists to establish commercial relations with the neighboring Spanish colonies. At the same time, Louisiana bore the encroachments of better-supplied British traders who were moving into Alabama and the Illinois country and developing regular trade with Indian tribes whom the French claimed as their own clients. With his customary thoroughness and scrupulous attention to documentary details, Marcel Giraud provides a vivid description of a struggling colony hovering between extinction and the spark of growth that would, in years to come, establish it as a viable French outpost in North America. Despite the obstacles facing Louisiana during these difficult years of transition, the colony survived to experience new expansion and development under the Company of the West.
The Story of Louisiana
Author: Maurice Thompson
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 337
Year: 1888
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A History of Louisiana
Author: Alcée Fortier
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages:
Year: 1904
View: 256
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Acadia Parish, Louisiana
Author: Mary Alice Fontenot, Paul B. Freeland
Publisher: University of Louisiana
ISBN: 1887366180
Pages: 746
Year: 1979-01-01
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Traces the region's development from pre-history to 1900.
Rapides Parish, Louisiana
Author: George Purnell Whittington
Publisher:
ISBN: 0974728527
Pages: 206
Year: 2004-12-01
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Rapides Parish, Louisiana, a History, by George Purnell Whittington, was the first comprehensive history of Alexandria and Rapides Parish. Unfortunately, due to the author's early demise, it was left incomplete after its coverage of the Civil War. Originally appearing in issues of the Louisiana Historical Quarterly from 1932-1935, it was published posthumously in one volume by the Alexandria Committee of the National Society of Colonial Dames in the State of Louisiana. It was out of print from sometime in the early 1970s until this second edition was recently completed by Red River X-Press. Topics include native and migrant Indians, Indian traders, early settlements and explorations by Spain and France, the Louisiana and Orleans territories and how they affected the local area, slavery and slave insurrections, schools and school teachers, early religion, courts and lawyers, Rapides and its leaders in the presidential campaign of 1860, preparations for the Civil War, the invasions and occupations of 1863 and 1864, (i.e. the Red River Campaign), the building of Bailey's dam to allow the escape of Union gunboats and transports, and the burning of Alexandria and much of Rapides Parish by retreating Union troops in 1864.
A History of French Louisiana: The reign of Louis XIV, 1698-1715
Author: Marcel Giraud
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 0807100587
Pages: 398
Year: 1974
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Keep in mind that French Louisiana took in a lot more area than the present-day state of Louisiana.
Archaeology of Louisiana
Author: Chip McGimsey
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 0807137057
Pages: 488
Year: 2010-11-30
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Archaeology of Louisiana provides a groundbreaking and up-to-date overview of archaeology in the Bayou State, including a thorough analysis of the cultures, communities, and people of Louisiana from the Native Americans of 13,000 years ago to the modern historical archaeology of New Orleans. With eighteen chapters and twenty-seven distinguished contributors, Archaeology of Louisiana brings together the studies of some of the most respected archaeologists currently working in the state, collecting in a single volume a range of methods and theories to offer a comprehensive understanding of the latest archaeological findings. In the past two decades alone, much new data has transformed our knowledge of Louisiana's history. This collection, accordingly, presents fresh perspectives based on current information, such as the discovery that Native Americans in Louisiana constructed some of the earliest-known monumental architecture in the world -- extensive earthen mounds -- during the Middle Archaic period (6000--2000 B.C.) Other contributors consider a variety of subjects, such as the development of complex societies without agriculture, underwater archaeology, the partnering of archaeologists with the Caddo Nation and descendant communities, and recent research in historical archaeology and cultural resource management that promises to transform our current appreciation of colonial Spanish, French, Creole, and African American experiences in the Lower Mississippi Valley. Accessible and engaging, Archaeology of Louisiana provides a complete and current archaeological reference to the state's unique heritage and history.
Teche
Author: Shane K. Bernard
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 1496809424
Pages: 272
Year: 2016-11-03
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Shane K. Bernard’s Teche examines this legendary waterway of the American Deep South. Bernard delves into the bayou’s geologic formation as a vestige of the Mississippi and Red Rivers, its prehistoric Native American occupation, and its colonial settlement by French, Spanish, and, eventually, Anglo-American pioneers. He surveys the coming of indigo, cotton, and sugar; steam-powered sugar mills and riverboats; and the brutal institution of slavery. He also examines the impact of the Civil War on the Teche, depicting the running battles up and down the bayou and the sporadic gunboat duels, when ironclads clashed in the narrow confines of the dark, sluggish river. Describing the misery of the postbellum era, Bernard reveals how epic floods, yellow fever, racial violence, and widespread poverty disrupted the lives of those who resided under the sprawling, moss-draped live oaks lining the Teche’s banks. Further, he chronicles the slow decline of the bayou, as the coming of the railroad, automobiles, and highways reduced its value as a means of travel. Finally, he considers modern efforts to redesign the Teche using dams, locks, levees, and other water-control measures. He examines the recent push to clean and revitalize the bayou after years of desecration by litter, pollutants, and invasive species. Illustrated with historic images and numerous maps, this book will be required reading for anyone seeking the colorful history of Louisiana and the Gulf Coast. As a bonus, the second part of the book describes Bernard’s own canoe journey down the Teche’s 125-mile course. This modern personal account from the field reveals the current state of the bayou and the remarkable people who still live along its banks.
Negro troops of antebellum Louisiana
Author: Roland Calhoun McConnell
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 143
Year: 1968
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