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London's Curse
Author: Mark Beynon
Publisher: The History Press
ISBN: 0752466720
Pages: 224
Year: 2011-10-31
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The first book to examine the bizarre sequence of deaths—all attributed to the "Curse of Tutankhamun"—that occurred in London's 1920s West End Throughout the 1920 and 1930s, London was gripped by the supposed curse of Tutankhamun, the Egyptian boy-king of antiquity, whose tomb was uncovered in 1923. Over the next few years more than 20 of those involved in the tomb's exhumation perished in strange, often terrifying circumstances, prompting the myth of the curse. With a blend of meticulous research and educated conjecture, historian Mark Beynon explores the strange circumstances surrounding a brutal murder at the Savoy Hotel, sinister happenings at Mayfair's Bath Club, a mysterious suicide at St. James's Court, and a series of inexplicable deaths linked to the British Museum, and uncovers a wealth of hitherto unpublished material that lays bare the truth behind these fatalities. Set against the backdrop of London's glittering 1920s and 30s, the author delves deep into the murky underworld of a morally corrupt and decadent city, and uncovers evidence that these deaths were not only linked by the ominous presence of Tutankhamum himself, but also by a murderer hell-bent on retribution and dubbed by the press as "The Most Wickedest Man in the World."
Harry Potter and the Cursed Child – Parts One and Two (Special Rehearsal Edition)
Author: J.K. Rowling, John Tiffany, Jack Thorne
Publisher: Pottermore Publishing
ISBN: 1781107041
Pages: 320
Year: 2016-07-31
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Based on an original new story by J.K. Rowling, Jack Thorne and John Tiffany, a new play by Jack Thorne, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is the eighth story in the Harry Potter series and the first official Harry Potter story to be presented on stage. The play received its world premiere in London’s West End on 30th July 2016. It was always difficult being Harry Potter and it isn’t much easier now that he is an overworked employee of the Ministry of Magic, a husband and father of three school-age children. While Harry grapples with a past that refuses to stay where it belongs, his youngest son Albus must struggle with the weight of a family legacy he never wanted. As past and present fuse ominously, both father and son learn the uncomfortable truth: sometimes, darkness comes from unexpected places.
The Finance Curse
Author: Nicholas Shaxson
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1473546931
Pages: 368
Year: 2018-10-11
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Read: 1249
Global finance is a system that works for the few and against the many. We need finance – but when finance grows too big it becomes a curse. The City of London is the single biggest drain on our resources; it sucks talent out of every sphere, it siphons wealth and hoovers up government time. Yet to be ‘competitive’, we’re told we must turn a blind eye to money-laundering and appease big business with tax cuts. We are told global finance is about wealth creation; the reality is wealth extraction. Tracing the curse back through economic history, Shaxson uncovers how we got to this point. He exposes offshore tax havens; the uncontrolled growth of monopolies; the myths around the Celtic Tiger and its low corporate tax rate; the bizarre industry of wealth management; the destructive horrors of private equity; and the sinister ‘Competitiveness Agenda’. Nicholas Shaxson revealed the dark heart of tax havens long before the Panama and Paradise Papers. Now he tells the explosive story of how finance established a stranglehold on society and points us towards a way out. This is a book that none of us can afford to ignore.
London's Curse
Author: Mark Beynon
Publisher: The History Press
ISBN: 0752466720
Pages: 224
Year: 2011-10-31
View: 728
Read: 700
The first book to examine the bizarre sequence of deaths—all attributed to the "Curse of Tutankhamun"—that occurred in London's 1920s West End Throughout the 1920 and 1930s, London was gripped by the supposed curse of Tutankhamun, the Egyptian boy-king of antiquity, whose tomb was uncovered in 1923. Over the next few years more than 20 of those involved in the tomb's exhumation perished in strange, often terrifying circumstances, prompting the myth of the curse. With a blend of meticulous research and educated conjecture, historian Mark Beynon explores the strange circumstances surrounding a brutal murder at the Savoy Hotel, sinister happenings at Mayfair's Bath Club, a mysterious suicide at St. James's Court, and a series of inexplicable deaths linked to the British Museum, and uncovers a wealth of hitherto unpublished material that lays bare the truth behind these fatalities. Set against the backdrop of London's glittering 1920s and 30s, the author delves deep into the murky underworld of a morally corrupt and decadent city, and uncovers evidence that these deaths were not only linked by the ominous presence of Tutankhamum himself, but also by a murderer hell-bent on retribution and dubbed by the press as "The Most Wickedest Man in the World."
The Seven Curses of London
Author: James Greenwood
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 336
Year: 1869
View: 911
Read: 725

The Siberian Curse
Author: Fiona Hill, Clifford G. Gaddy
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press
ISBN: 0815796188
Pages: 240
Year: 2003-11-04
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Can Russia ever become a normal, free-market, democratic society? Why have so many reforms failed since the Soviet Union's collapse? In this highly-original work, Fiona Hill and Clifford Gaddy argue that Russia's geography, history, and monumental mistakes perpetrated by Soviet planners have locked it into a dead-end path to economic ruin. Shattering a number of myths that have long persisted in the West and in Russia, The Siberian Curse explains why Russia's greatest assets––its gigantic size and Siberia's natural resources––are now the source of one its greatest weaknesses. For seventy years, driven by ideological zeal and the imperative to colonize and industrialize its vast frontiers, communist planners forced people to live in Siberia. They did this in true totalitarian fashion by using the GULAG prison system and slave labor to build huge factories and million-person cities to support them. Today, tens of millions of people and thousands of large-scale industrial enterprises languish in the cold and distant places communist planners put them––not where market forces or free choice would have placed them. Russian leaders still believe that an industrialized Siberia is the key to Russia's prosperity. As a result, the country is burdened by the ever-increasing costs of subsidizing economic activity in some of the most forbidding places on the planet. Russia pays a steep price for continuing this folly––it wastes the very resources it needs to recover from the ravages of communism. Hill and Gaddy contend that Russia's future prosperity requires that it finally throw off the shackles of its Soviet past, by shrinking Siberia's cities. Only by facilitating the relocation of population to western Russia, closer to Europe and its markets, can Russia achieve sustainable economic growth. Unfortunately for Russia, there is no historical precedent for shrinking cities on the scale that will be required. Downsizing Siberia will be a costly and wrenching process. But there is no alternative. Russia cannot afford to keep the cities communist planners left for it out in the cold.
Learning to Curse
Author: Stephen Greenblatt
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136774203
Pages: 280
Year: 2012-08-21
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Stephen Greenblatt argued in these celebrated essays that the art of the Renaissance could only be understood in the context of the society from which it sprang. His approach - 'New Historicism' - drew from history, anthropology, Marxist theory, post-structuralism, and psychoanalysis and in the process, blew apart the academic boundaries insulating literature from the world around it. Learning to Curse charts the evolution of that approach and provides a vivid and compelling exploration of a complex and contradictory epoch.
The Mummy's Curse
Author: Jasmine Day
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134297955
Pages: 240
Year: 2006-09-27
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The most penetrating study of the curse ever conducted, The Mummy's Curse uncovers forgotten nineteenth-century fiction and poetry, revolutionizes the study of mummy horror films, and reveals the prejudices embedded in children’s toys. Examining original surveys and field observations of museum visitors demonstrate that media stereotypes - to which museums inadvertently contribute - promote vilification of mummies, which can invalidate demands for their removal from display. Jasmine Day shows that the curse's structure and meaning has changed over time, as public attitudes toward archaeology and the Middle East were transformed by events such as the discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb. The riddle of the 'curse of the pharaohs' is finally solved via a radical anthropological treatment of the legend as a cultural concept rather than a physical phenomenon. A must for anyone interested in this ancient and mystifying legend.
The Seven Curses of London
Author: James Greenwood
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 336
Year: 1869
View: 371
Read: 576

Young People and the Curse of Ordinariness
Author: Nick Luxmoore
Publisher: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
ISBN: 0857004077
Pages: 144
Year: 2011-06-15
View: 666
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Again and again, young people return to the question, "Am I the same as other people or am I different?" It's a difficult question to answer. Everyone knows that they're the same as other people in lots of ways yet they suspect that they might also be different. Or they want to be different... Or they accuse other people of being different... Or they get beaten up for being different... This book is about young people trying to find answers, or at least trying to live more comfortably with the question. Using dozens of recognisable vignettes, Luxmoore explores young people's anxieties about ordinariness and extraordinariness, anxieties that affect everything: their behaviour, choices, relationships, happiness. He describes ways of working supportively and imaginatively with young people so that they can begin to find a better balance, enjoying their lives and achieving all sorts of things without losing sight of the fact that - underneath everything and like everyone else - they're ordinary, and there's nothing wrong with that. This original and thought-provoking book will enable professionals in counselling, teaching, youth work and youth justice to support young people struggling with these anxieties and the eternal question, "Am I normal?"
The Seven Curses of London. [With Portrait of the Author.]
Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages:
Year: 1869
View: 562
Read: 165

The Curse of Four
Author: Caitlin Kittredge
Publisher: Subterranean
ISBN: 159606398X
Pages: 143
Year: 2011
View: 1326
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After Fiona Hannigan is found murdered, former black magician Jack Winter is accused of the crime, along with three other slayings, and he must return to the supernatural world he left behind to find the real killer.
The Mummy's Curse
Author: Roger Luckhurst
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191640980
Pages: 336
Year: 2012-10-25
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In the winter of 1922-23 archaeologist Howard Carter and his wealthy patron George Herbert, the Fifth Earl of Carnarvon, sensationally opened the tomb of Tutenkhamen. Six weeks later Herbert, the sponsor of the expedition, died in Egypt. The popular press went wild with rumours of a curse on those who disturbed the Pharaoh's rest and for years followed every twist and turn of the fate of the men who had been involved in the historic discovery. Long dismissed by Egyptologists, the mummy's curse remains a part of popular supernatural belief. Roger Luckhurst explores why the myth has captured the British imagination across the centuries, and how it has impacted on popular culture. Tutankhamen was not the first curse story to emerge in British popular culture. This book uncovers the 'true' stories of two extraordinary Victorian gentlemen widely believed at the time to have been cursed by the artefacts they brought home from Egypt in the nineteenth century. These are weird and wonderful stories that weave together a cast of famous writers, painters, feted soldiers, lowly smugglers, respected men of science, disreputable society dames, and spooky spiritualists. Focusing on tales of the curse myth, Roger Luckhurst leads us through Victorian museums, international exhibitions, private collections, the battlefields of Egypt and Sudan, and the writings of figures like Arthur Conan Doyle, Rider Haggard and Algernon Blackwood. Written in an open and accessible style, this volume is the product of over ten years research in London's most curious archives. It explores how we became fascinated with Egypt and how this fascination was fuelled by myth, mystery, and rumour. Moreover, it provides a new and startling path through the cultural history of Victorian England and its colonial possessions.
The Curse of Lono
Author: Hunter S. Thompson, Ralph Steadman
Publisher: Taschen America Llc
ISBN: 3836548968
Pages: 205
Year: 2014-05-01
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A wild ride to the dark side of Americana. Hunter S. Thompson's and Ralph Steadman's most eccentric book The Curse of Lono is to Hawaii what Fear and Loathing was to Las Vegas: the crazy tales of a journalist's “coverage” of a news event that ends up being a wild ride to the dark side of Americana. Originally published in 1983, The Curse of Lono features all of the zany, hallucinogenic wordplay and feral artwork for which the Hunter S. Thompson/Ralph Steadmanduo became known and loved. This curious book, considered an oddity among Hunter's œuvre, was long out of print, prompting collectors to search high and low for an original copy. TASCHEN's signed, limited edition sold out before the book even hit the stores—this unlimited version, in a different, smaller format, makes The Curse of Lono accessible to everyone.
Thomas Burke's Dark Chinoiserie
Author: Anne Veronica Witchard
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 0754658643
Pages: 292
Year: 2009
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Focusing on Thomas Burke's bestselling collection of short stories, Limehouse Nights (1916), Anne Witchard's interdisciplinary book contextualises the burgeoning cult of Chinatown in turn-of-the-century London. Witchard shows that Burke's immensely popular Chinatown stories destabilize social orthodoxies in highly complex ways, forcing us to rethink his influence on both sides of the Atlantic. She shows that China and chinoiserie served as mirrors that reveal the disquietudes of western art and culture.

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