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LMF Lexical Markup Framework
Author: Gil Francopoulo
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118712595
Pages: 288
Year: 2013-05-06
View: 1054
Read: 512
The community responsible for developing lexicons for Natural Language Processing (NLP) and Machine Readable Dictionaries (MRDs) started their ISO standardization activities in 2003. These activities resulted in the ISO standard – Lexical Markup Framework (LMF). After selecting and defining a common terminology, the LMF team had to identify the common notions shared by all lexicons in order to specify a common skeleton (called the core model) and understand the various requirements coming from different groups of users. The goals of LMF are to provide a common model for the creation and use of lexical resources, to manage the exchange of data between and among these resources, and to enable the merging of a large number of individual electronic resources to form extensive global electronic resources. The various types of individual instantiations of LMF can include monolingual, bilingual or multilingual lexical resources. The same specifications can be used for small and large lexicons, both simple and complex, as well as for both written and spoken lexical representations. The descriptions range from morphology, syntax and computational semantics to computer-assisted translation. The languages covered are not restricted to European languages, but apply to all natural languages. The LMF specification is now a success and numerous lexicon managers currently use LMF in different languages and contexts. This book starts with the historical context of LMF, before providing an overview of the LMF model and the Data Category Registry, which provides a flexible means for applying constants like /grammatical gender/ in a variety of different settings. It then presents concrete applications and experiments on real data, which are important for developers who want to learn about the use of LMF. Contents 1. LMF – Historical Context and Perspectives, Nicoletta Calzolari, Monica Monachini and Claudia Soria. 2. Model Description, Gil Francopoulo and Monte George. 3. LMF and the Data Category Registry: Principles and Application, Menzo Windhouwer and Sue Ellen Wright. 4. Wordnet-LMF: A Standard Representation for Multilingual Wordnets, Piek Vossen, Claudia Soria and Monica Monachini. 5. Prolmf: A Multilingual Dictionary of Proper Names and their Relations, Denis Maurel, Béatrice Bouchou-Markhoff. 6. LMF for Arabic, Aida Khemakhem, Bilel Gargouri, Kais Haddar and Abdelmajid Ben Hamadou. 7. LMF for a Selection of African Languages, Chantal Enguehard and Mathieu Mangeot. 8. LMF and its Implementation in Some Asian Languages, Takenobu Tokunaga, Sophia Y.M. Lee, Virach Sornlertlamvanich, Kiyoaki Shirai, Shu-Kai Hsieh and Chu-Ren Huang. 9. DUELME: Dutch Electronic Lexicon of Multiword Expressions, Jan Odijk. 10. UBY-LMF – Exploring the Boundaries of Language-Independent Lexicon Models, Judith Eckle-Kohler, Iryna Gurevych, Silvana Hartmann, Michael Matuschek and Christian M. Meyer. 11. Conversion of Lexicon-Grammar Tables to LMF: Application to French, Éric Laporte, Elsa Tolone and Matthieu Constant. 12. Collaborative Tools: From Wiktionary to LMF, for Synchronic and Diachronic Language Data, Thierry Declerck, Pirsoka Lendvai and Karlheinz Mörth. 13. LMF Experiments on Format Conversions for Resource Merging: Converters and Problems, Marta Villegas, Muntsa Padró and Núria Bel. 14. LMF as a Foundation for Servicized Lexical Resources, Yoshihiko Hayashi, Monica Monachini, Bora Savas, Claudia Soria and Nicoletta Calzolari. 15. Creating a Serialization of LMF: The Experience of the RELISH Project, Menzo Windhouwer, Justin Petro, Irina Nevskaya, Sebastian Drude, Helen Aristar-Dry and Jost Gippert. 16. Global Atlas: Proper Nouns, From Wikipedia to LMF, Gil Francopoulo, Frédéric Marcoul, David Causse and Grégory Piparo. 17. LMF in U.S. Government Language Resource Management, Monte George. About the Authors Gil Francopoulo works for Tagmatica (www.tagmatica.com), a company specializing in software development in the field of linguistics and documentation in the semantic web, in Paris, France, as well as for Spotter (www.spotter.com), a company specializing in media and social media analytics.
LMF Lexical Markup Framework
Author: Gil Francopoulo
Publisher: Wiley-ISTE
ISBN: 1848214308
Pages: 288
Year: 2013-04-08
View: 1200
Read: 933
The community responsible for developing lexicons for Natural Language Processing (NLP) and Machine Readable Dictionaries (MRDs) started their ISO standardization activities in 2003. These activities resulted in the ISO standard – Lexical Markup Framework (LMF). After selecting and defining a common terminology, the LMF team had to identify the common notions shared by all lexicons in order to specify a common skeleton (called the core model) and understand the various requirements coming from different groups of users. The goals of LMF are to provide a common model for the creation and use of lexical resources, to manage the exchange of data between and among these resources, and to enable the merging of a large number of individual electronic resources to form extensive global electronic resources. The various types of individual instantiations of LMF can include monolingual, bilingual or multilingual lexical resources. The same specifications can be used for small and large lexicons, both simple and complex, as well as for both written and spoken lexical representations. The descriptions range from morphology, syntax and computational semantics to computer-assisted translation. The languages covered are not restricted to European languages, but apply to all natural languages. The LMF specification is now a success and numerous lexicon managers currently use LMF in different languages and contexts. This book starts with the historical context of LMF, before providing an overview of the LMF model and the Data Category Registry, which provides a flexible means for applying constants like /grammatical gender/ in a variety of different settings. It then presents concrete applications and experiments on real data, which are important for developers who want to learn about the use of LMF. Contents 1. LMF – Historical Context and Perspectives, Nicoletta Calzolari, Monica Monachini and Claudia Soria. 2. Model Description, Gil Francopoulo and Monte George. 3. LMF and the Data Category Registry: Principles and Application, Menzo Windhouwer and Sue Ellen Wright. 4. Wordnet-LMF: A Standard Representation for Multilingual Wordnets, Piek Vossen, Claudia Soria and Monica Monachini. 5. Prolmf: A Multilingual Dictionary of Proper Names and their Relations, Denis Maurel, Béatrice Bouchou-Markhoff. 6. LMF for Arabic, Aida Khemakhem, Bilel Gargouri, Kais Haddar and Abdelmajid Ben Hamadou. 7. LMF for a Selection of African Languages, Chantal Enguehard and Mathieu Mangeot. 8. LMF and its Implementation in Some Asian Languages, Takenobu Tokunaga, Sophia Y.M. Lee, Virach Sornlertlamvanich, Kiyoaki Shirai, Shu-Kai Hsieh and Chu-Ren Huang. 9. DUELME: Dutch Electronic Lexicon of Multiword Expressions, Jan Odijk. 10. UBY-LMF – Exploring the Boundaries of Language-Independent Lexicon Models, Judith Eckle-Kohler, Iryna Gurevych, Silvana Hartmann, Michael Matuschek and Christian M. Meyer. 11. Conversion of Lexicon-Grammar Tables to LMF: Application to French, Éric Laporte, Elsa Tolone and Matthieu Constant. 12. Collaborative Tools: From Wiktionary to LMF, for Synchronic and Diachronic Language Data, Thierry Declerck, Pirsoka Lendvai and Karlheinz Mörth. 13. LMF Experiments on Format Conversions for Resource Merging: Converters and Problems, Marta Villegas, Muntsa Padró and Núria Bel. 14. LMF as a Foundation for Servicized Lexical Resources, Yoshihiko Hayashi, Monica Monachini, Bora Savas, Claudia Soria and Nicoletta Calzolari. 15. Creating a Serialization of LMF: The Experience of the RELISH Project, Menzo Windhouwer, Justin Petro, Irina Nevskaya, Sebastian Drude, Helen Aristar-Dry and Jost Gippert. 16. Global Atlas: Proper Nouns, From Wikipedia to LMF, Gil Francopoulo, Frédéric Marcoul, David Causse and Grégory Piparo. 17. LMF in U.S. Government Language Resource Management, Monte George. About the Authors Gil Francopoulo works for Tagmatica (www.tagmatica.com), a company specializing in software development in the field of linguistics and documentation in the semantic web, in Paris, France, as well as for Spotter (www.spotter.com), a company specializing in media and social media analytics.
LMF Lexical Markup Framework
Author: Gil Francopoulo
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118712668
Pages: 266
Year: 2013-05-06
View: 601
Read: 1225
The community responsible for developing lexicons for Natural Language Processing (NLP) and Machine Readable Dictionaries (MRDs) started their ISO standardization activities in 2003. These activities resulted in the ISO standard – Lexical Markup Framework (LMF). After selecting and defining a common terminology, the LMF team had to identify the common notions shared by all lexicons in order to specify a common skeleton (called the core model) and understand the various requirements coming from different groups of users. The goals of LMF are to provide a common model for the creation and use of lexical resources, to manage the exchange of data between and among these resources, and to enable the merging of a large number of individual electronic resources to form extensive global electronic resources. The various types of individual instantiations of LMF can include monolingual, bilingual or multilingual lexical resources. The same specifications can be used for small and large lexicons, both simple and complex, as well as for both written and spoken lexical representations. The descriptions range from morphology, syntax and computational semantics to computer-assisted translation. The languages covered are not restricted to European languages, but apply to all natural languages. The LMF specification is now a success and numerous lexicon managers currently use LMF in different languages and contexts. This book starts with the historical context of LMF, before providing an overview of the LMF model and the Data Category Registry, which provides a flexible means for applying constants like /grammatical gender/ in a variety of different settings. It then presents concrete applications and experiments on real data, which are important for developers who want to learn about the use of LMF. Contents 1. LMF – Historical Context and Perspectives, Nicoletta Calzolari, Monica Monachini and Claudia Soria. 2. Model Description, Gil Francopoulo and Monte George. 3. LMF and the Data Category Registry: Principles and Application, Menzo Windhouwer and Sue Ellen Wright. 4. Wordnet-LMF: A Standard Representation for Multilingual Wordnets, Piek Vossen, Claudia Soria and Monica Monachini. 5. Prolmf: A Multilingual Dictionary of Proper Names and their Relations, Denis Maurel, Béatrice Bouchou-Markhoff. 6. LMF for Arabic, Aida Khemakhem, Bilel Gargouri, Kais Haddar and Abdelmajid Ben Hamadou. 7. LMF for a Selection of African Languages, Chantal Enguehard and Mathieu Mangeot. 8. LMF and its Implementation in Some Asian Languages, Takenobu Tokunaga, Sophia Y.M. Lee, Virach Sornlertlamvanich, Kiyoaki Shirai, Shu-Kai Hsieh and Chu-Ren Huang. 9. DUELME: Dutch Electronic Lexicon of Multiword Expressions, Jan Odijk. 10. UBY-LMF – Exploring the Boundaries of Language-Independent Lexicon Models, Judith Eckle-Kohler, Iryna Gurevych, Silvana Hartmann, Michael Matuschek and Christian M. Meyer. 11. Conversion of Lexicon-Grammar Tables to LMF: Application to French, Éric Laporte, Elsa Tolone and Matthieu Constant. 12. Collaborative Tools: From Wiktionary to LMF, for Synchronic and Diachronic Language Data, Thierry Declerck, Pirsoka Lendvai and Karlheinz Mörth. 13. LMF Experiments on Format Conversions for Resource Merging: Converters and Problems, Marta Villegas, Muntsa Padró and Núria Bel. 14. LMF as a Foundation for Servicized Lexical Resources, Yoshihiko Hayashi, Monica Monachini, Bora Savas, Claudia Soria and Nicoletta Calzolari. 15. Creating a Serialization of LMF: The Experience of the RELISH Project, Menzo Windhouwer, Justin Petro, Irina Nevskaya, Sebastian Drude, Helen Aristar-Dry and Jost Gippert. 16. Global Atlas: Proper Nouns, From Wikipedia to LMF, Gil Francopoulo, Frédéric Marcoul, David Causse and Grégory Piparo. 17. LMF in U.S. Government Language Resource Management, Monte George. About the Authors Gil Francopoulo works for Tagmatica (www.tagmatica.com), a company specializing in software development in the field of linguistics and documentation in the semantic web, in Paris, France, as well as for Spotter (www.spotter.com), a company specializing in media and social media analytics.
Semi-Automatic Ontology Development: Processes and Resources
Author: Pazienza, Maria Teresa
Publisher: IGI Global
ISBN: 1466601892
Pages: 340
Year: 2012-02-29
View: 777
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"This book includes state-of-the-art research results aimed at the automation of ontology development processes and the reuse of external resources becoming a reality, thus being of interest for a wide and diversified community of users"--
Language Resource Management
Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 77
Year: 2008
View: 1220
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Towards a Theoretical Framework for Analyzing Complex Linguistic Networks
Author: Alexander Mehler, Andy Lücking, Sven Banisch, Philippe Blanchard, Barbara Job
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3662472384
Pages: 343
Year: 2015-07-07
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The aim of this book is to advocate and promote network models of linguistic systems that are both based on thorough mathematical models and substantiated in terms of linguistics. In this way, the book contributes first steps towards establishing a statistical network theory as a theoretical basis of linguistic network analysis the boarder of the natural sciences and the humanities. This book addresses researchers who want to get familiar with theoretical developments, computational models and their empirical evaluation in the field of complex linguistic networks. It is intended to all those who are interested in statistical models of linguistic systems from the point of view of network research. This includes all relevant areas of linguistics ranging from phonological, morphological and lexical networks on the one hand and syntactic, semantic and pragmatic networks on the other. In this sense, the volume concerns readers from many disciplines such as physics, linguistics, computer science and information science. It may also be of interest for the upcoming area of systems biology with which the chapters collected here share the view on systems from the point of view of network analysis.
Towards the Multilingual Semantic Web
Author: Paul Buitelaar, Philipp Cimiano
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3662435853
Pages: 333
Year: 2014-11-13
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To date, the relation between multilingualism and the Semantic Web has not yet received enough attention in the research community. One major challenge for the Semantic Web community is to develop architectures, frameworks and systems that can help in overcoming national and language barriers, facilitating equal access to information produced in different cultures and languages. As such, this volume aims at documenting the state-of-the-art with regard to the vision of a Multilingual Semantic Web, in which semantic information will be accessible in and across multiple languages. The Multilingual Semantic Web as envisioned in this volume will support the following functionalities: (1) responding to information needs in any language with regard to semantically structured data available on the Semantic Web and Linked Open Data (LOD) cloud, (2) verbalizing and accessing semantically structured data, ontologies or other conceptualizations in multiple languages, (3) harmonizing, integrating, aggregating, comparing and repurposing semantically structured data across languages and (4) aligning and reconciling ontologies or other conceptualizations across languages. The volume is divided into three main sections: Principles, Methods and Applications. The section on “Principles” discusses models, architectures and methodologies that enrich the current Semantic Web architecture with features necessary to handle multiple languages. The section on “Methods” describes algorithms and approaches for solving key issues related to the construction of the Multilingual Semantic Web. The section on “Applications” describes the use of Multilingual Semantic Web based approaches in the context of several application domains. This volume is essential reading for all academic and industrial researchers who want to embark on this new research field at the intersection of various research topics, including the Semantic Web, Linked Data, natural language processing, computational linguistics, terminology and information retrieval. It will also be of great interest to practitioners who are interested in re-examining their existing infrastructure and methodologies for handling multiple languages in Web applications or information retrieval systems.
Lexical Markup Framework
Author: Frederic P. Miller, Agnes F. Vandome, John McBrewster
Publisher: Alphascript Publishing
ISBN: 6130274386
Pages: 70
Year: 2009-12
View: 447
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Language resource management - Lexical markup framework (LMF), is the ISO International Organization for Standardization ISO/To7 standard for natural language processing (NLP) and machine-readable dictionary (MRD) lexicons. The scope is standardization of principles and methods relating to language resources in the contexts of multilingual communication and cultural diversity.
Text, Speech, and Dialogue
Author: Pavel Král, Václav Matoušek
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319240331
Pages: 612
Year: 2015-09-18
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This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Text, Speech and Dialogue, TSD 2015, held in Pilsen, Czech Republic, in September 2015. The 67 papers presented together with 3 invited papers were carefully reviewed and selected from 138 submissions. They focus on topics such as corpora and language resources; speech recognition; tagging, classification and parsing of text and speech; speech and spoken language generation; semantic processing of text and speech; integrating applications of text and speech processing; automatic dialogue systems; as well as multimodal techniques and modelling.
Language Processing and Intelligent Information Systems
Author: Mieczyslaw A. Klopotek, Jacek Koronacki, Malgorzata Marciniak, Agnieszka Mykowiecka, Slawomir Wierzchon
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3642386342
Pages: 269
Year: 2013-06-07
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This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the International Conference on Intelligent Information Systems, IIS 2013, held in Warsaw, Poland in June 2013. The 28 full papers included in this volume were carefully reviewed and selected from 53 submissions. The contributions are organized in topical sections named: Natural language processing, text and Web mining, and machine learning and search.
Natural Language Processing and Computational Linguistics
Author: Mohamed Zakaria Kurdi
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1119145570
Pages: 296
Year: 2016-08-17
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Natural language processing (NLP) is a scientific discipline which is found at the interface of computer science, artificial intelligence and cognitive psychology. Providing an overview of international work in this interdisciplinary field, this book gives the reader a panoramic view of both early and current research in NLP. Carefully chosen multilingual examples present the state of the art of a mature field which is in a constant state of evolution. In four chapters, this book presents the fundamental concepts of phonetics and phonology and the two most important applications in the field of speech processing: recognition and synthesis. Also presented are the fundamental concepts of corpus linguistics and the basic concepts of morphology and its NLP applications such as stemming and part of speech tagging. The fundamental notions and the most important syntactic theories are presented, as well as the different approaches to syntactic parsing with reference to cognitive models, algorithms and computer applications.
Linked Data in Linguistics
Author: Christian Chiarcos, Sebastian Nordhoff, Sebastian Hellmann
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 3642282490
Pages: 218
Year: 2012-02-21
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The explosion of information technology has led to substantial growth of web-accessible linguistic data in terms of quantity, diversity and complexity. These resources become even more useful when interlinked with each other to generate network effects. The general trend of providing data online is thus accompanied by newly developing methodologies to interconnect linguistic data and metadata. This includes linguistic data collections, general-purpose knowledge bases (e.g., the DBpedia, a machine-readable edition of the Wikipedia), and repositories with specific information about languages, linguistic categories and phenomena. The Linked Data paradigm provides a framework for interoperability and access management, and thereby allows to integrate information from such a diverse set of resources. The contributions assembled in this volume illustrate the band-width of applications of the Linked Data paradigm for representative types of language resources. They cover lexical-semantic resources, annotated corpora, typological databases as well as terminology and metadata repositories. The book includes representative applications from diverse fields, ranging from academic linguistics (e.g., typology and corpus linguistics) over applied linguistics (e.g., lexicography and translation studies) to technical applications (in computational linguistics, Natural Language Processing and information technology). This volume accompanies the Workshop on Linked Data in Linguistics 2012 (LDL-2012) in Frankfurt/M., Germany, organized by the Open Linguistics Working Group (OWLG) of the Open Knowledge Foundation (OKFN). It assembles contributions of the workshop participants and, beyond this, it summarizes initial steps in the formation of a Linked Open Data cloud of linguistic resources, the Linguistic Linked Open Data cloud (LLOD).
Formalising Natural Languages with NooJ
Author: Anaïd Donabédian, Victoria Khurshudian, Max Silberztein
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 1443850195
Pages: 255
Year: 2013-07-16
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NooJ is a linguistic development environment that provides tools for linguists to construct linguistic resources that formalise a large gamut of linguistic phenomena: typography, orthography, lexicons for simple words, multiword units and discontinuous expressions, inflectional and derivational morphology, local, structural and transformational syntax, and semantics. For each resource that linguists create, NooJ provides parsers that can apply it to any corpus of texts in order to extract examples or counter-examples, to annotate matching sequences, to perform statistical analyses, etc. NooJ also contains generators that can produce the texts that these linguistic resources describe, as well as a rich toolbox that allows linguists to construct, maintain, test, debug, accumulate and reuse linguistic resources. For each elementary linguistic phenomenon to be described, NooJ proposes a set of computational formalisms, the power of which ranges from very efficient finite-state automata to very powerful Turing machines. This makes NooJ’s approach different from most other computational linguistic tools that typically offer a unique formalism to their users. Since it was released in 2002, NooJ has been enhanced with new features every year. Linguists, researchers in the social sciences and, more generally, professionals who analyse texts have contributed to its development and participated in the annual NooJ conference. Since 2011, the European project Meta-Net CESAR has introduced new interest in NooJ as well as a new set of projects, both in linguistics and in computer science. The present volume contains 18 articles selected from the 32 papers presented at the International NooJ 2012 Conference which was held from June 14th to 16th at the Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales (INALCO) in Paris. These articles are organised in three parts: “Vocabulary and Morphology” contains five articles; “Syntax and Semantics” contains six articles; “NooJ Applications” contains six articles. In this volume, we decided to add a new part: eight short papers that present prototype NooJ modules developed by graduate students and that could serve as bases for more ambitious projects.
The Oxford Guide to Practical Lexicography
Author: B. T. Sue Atkins, Michael Rundell
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199277710
Pages: 540
Year: 2008-06-19
View: 505
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This comprehensive introduction by two of the world's leading lexicographers presents a course in dictionary-making for publishers, colleges, and universities world-wide. The book takes readers through building a corpus, analysing the data, and writing entries. Numerous exercises show the use of software to manipulate data and compile entries.
Text, Speech and Dialogue
Author: Petr Sojka, Aleš Horak, Ivan Kopecek, Karel Pala
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3642327907
Pages: 700
Year: 2012-08-08
View: 716
Read: 403
This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Text, Speech and Dialogue, TSD 2012, held in Brno, Czech Republic, in September 2012. The 82 papers presented together with 2 invited talks were carefully reviewed and selected from 173 submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections on corpora and language resources, speech recognition, tagging, classification and parsing of text and speech, speech and spoken language generation, semantic processing of text and speech, integrating applications of text and speech processing, machine translation, automatic dialogue systems, multimodal techniques and modeling.

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