Limbo A Novel About Jamaica Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Limbo
Author: Esther Figueroa
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
ISBN: 1628723882
Pages: 256
Year: 2014-03-04
View: 852
Read: 537
Limbo is a character driven environmental murder mystery set in the shifting sands of Jamaica’s environmental policies. Flora is the dynamic leader of an environmental organization set to expose the corporate greed and political hypocrisy that has polluted so much of the Jamaica’s once pristine coastal environment. Funding difficulties as well as personal crises loom as Flora attempts to take on the big business of the hotel industry despite threats to her life. Old friends and revelations from the past surface to reveal that all is not what it seems to be. A new lover tempts Flora to consider a life that she has pushed away for years, causing her to ask herself the fundamental questions: How does one change a life? How does one change a society? When a film-maker dies trying to document environmental degradation, the plot heats up as Flora races the clock to expose the culprits before she herself becomes a victim. With fantastic characters steeped in Jamaican culture and language, LIMBO is both a fluid, fun mystery and a seething condemnation of Jamaican’s political and environmental turmoil. Skyhorse Publishing, as well as our Arcade, Yucca, and Good Books imprints, are proud to publish a broad range of books for readers interested in fiction—novels, novellas, political and medical thrillers, comedy, satire, historical fiction, romance, erotic and love stories, mystery, classic literature, folklore and mythology, literary classics including Shakespeare, Dumas, Wilde, Cather, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.
Blue Limbo
Author: Frank Lauria
Publisher: Open Road Media
ISBN: 1497613124
Pages: 310
Year: 2014-04-01
View: 691
Read: 1205
A nuclear sub trapped in the Bermuda Triangle . . . A sensual widow’s lover, stalked by her zombie husband . . . A cadre of undead assassins—in a devastating plot to dominate the world . . . A beautiful voodoo priestess with the power of sexual healing . . . This is Blue Limbo, a Doctor Orient Occult Novel. Telepathy, technology, and supernatural evil intertwine in this high-energy thriller. Doctor Owen Orient attempts to locate a crippled nuclear sub somewhere in the Caribbean—and becomes drawn into a soul-chilling battle with Voodoo Lord, whose power ripples from Jamaica to the Pentagon.
Beyond the Limbo Silence
Author: Elizabeth Nunez
Publisher: Seal Press (CA)
ISBN: 1580050174
Pages: 321
Year: 1998
View: 697
Read: 582
When Sara Edgehill leaves her home in Trinidad to attend college in Wisconsin, she finds solace and friendship with Courtney, another West Indian who covertly practices voodoo rituals, and Sam, a charismatic civil rights activist
A Brief History of Seven Killings
Author: Marlon James
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 159448600X
Pages: 688
Year: 2014
View: 1106
Read: 902
"From the acclaimed writer of The Book of Night Women comes a masterful novel framed as a fictional oral history that explores the events and characters surrounding the attempted assassination of Bob Marley during the political turmoil on Jamaica in the late 1970s"--
Sacral Grooves, Limbo Gateways
Author: Keith Cartwright
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820345997
Pages: 308
Year: 2013
View: 1179
Read: 426
“We're seeing people that we didn't know exist,” the director of FEMA acknowledged in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. Sacral Grooves, Limbo Gateways offers a corrective to some of America's institutionalized invisibilities by delving into the submerged networks of ritual performance, writing, intercultural history, and migration that have linked the coastal U.S. South with the Caribbean and the wider Atlantic world. This interdisciplinary study slips beneath the bar of rigid national and literary periods, embarking upon deeper—more rhythmic and embodied—signatures of time. It swings low through ecologies and symbolic orders of creolized space. And it reappraises pluralistic modes of knowledge, kinship, and authority that have sustained vital forms of agency (such as jazz) amid abysses of racialized trauma. Drawing from Haitian Vodou and New Orleanian Voudou and from Cuban and South Floridian Santería, as well as from Afro-Baptist (Caribbean, Geechee, and Bahamian) models of encounters with otherness, this book reemplaces deep-southern texts within the counterclockwise ring-stepping of a long Afro-Atlantic modernity. Turning to an orphan girl's West African initiation tale to follow a remarkably traveled body of feminine rites and writing (in works by Paule Marshall, Zora Neale Hurston, Lydia Cabrera, William Faulkner, James Weldon Johnson, and LeAnne Howe, among others), Cartwright argues that only in holistic form, emergent from gulfs of cross-cultural witness, can literary and humanistic authority find legitimacy. Without such grounding, he contends, our educational institutions blind and even poison students, bringing them to “swallow lye,” like the grandson of Phoenix Jackson in Eudora Welty's “A Worn Path.” Here, literary study may open pathways to alternative medicines—fetched by tenacious avatars like Phoenix (or an orphan Kumba or a shell-shaking Turtle)—to remedy the lies our partial histories have made us swallow.
Writing in Limbo
Author: Simon Gikandi
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 150172293X
Pages: 276
Year: 2018-03-15
View: 682
Read: 430
In Simon Gikandi’s view, Caribbean literature and postcolonial literature more generally negotiate an uneasy relationship with the concepts of modernism and modernity—a relationship in which the Caribbean writer, unable to escape a history encoded by Europe, accepts the challenge of rewriting it. Drawing on contemporary deconstructionist theory, Gikandi looks at how such Caribbean writers as George Lamming, Samuel Selvon, Alejo Carpentier, C. L. R. James, Paule Marshall, Merle Hodge, Zee Edgell, and Michelle Cliff have attempted to confront European modernism.
A High Wind in Jamaica
Author: Richard Hughes
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 0099437430
Pages: 175
Year: 2002
View: 1270
Read: 730
On the high seas of the Caribbean, a family of English children is set loose - sent by their parents from their home in Jamaica to receive the civilising effects of England. When their ship is captured by pirates, the thrilling cruise continues as the children transfer their affections from one batch of sailors to another. Innocence is their protection, but as life in the care of pirates reveals its dangers, the events which unfold begin to take on a savagely detached quality.
The Parking Lot Attendant
Author: Nafkote Tamirat
Publisher: Henry Holt
ISBN: 1250128501
Pages: 240
Year: 2018-03-13
View: 1311
Read: 362
A mesmerizing, indelible coming-of-age story about a girl in Boston's tightly-knit Ethiopian community who falls under the spell of a charismatic hustler out to change the world A haunting story of fatherhood, national identity, and what it means to be an immigrant in America today, Nafkote Tamirat's The Parking Lot Attendant explores how who we love, the choices we make, and the places we’re from combine to make us who we are. The story begins on an undisclosed island where the unnamed narrator and her father are the two newest and least liked members of a commune that has taken up residence there. Though the commune was built on utopian principles, it quickly becomes clear that life here is not as harmonious as the founders intended. After immersing us in life on the island, our young heroine takes us back to Boston to recount the events that brought her here. Though she and her father belong to a wide Ethiopian network in the city, they mostly keep to themselves, which is how her father prefers it. This detached existence only makes Ayale’s arrival on the scene more intoxicating. The unofficial king of Boston’s Ethiopian community, Ayale is a born hustler—when he turns his attention to the narrator, she feels seen for the first time. Ostensibly a parking lot attendant, Ayale soon proves to have other projects in the works, which the narrator becomes more and more entangled in to her father’s growing dismay. By the time the scope of Ayale’s schemes—and their repercussions—become apparent, our narrator has unwittingly become complicit in something much bigger and darker than she ever imagined.
Prospero's Daughter
Author: Elizabeth Nunez
Publisher: Akashic Books
ISBN: 1617755427
Pages: 320
Year: 2016-10-25
View: 693
Read: 783
“The very title of Elizabeth Nunez’s gripping and richly imagined sixth novel, Prospero’s Daughter, distances her work from both the original Tempest (in which the daughter, Miranda, is perhaps the least developed of all Shakespearean heroines) and from the many postcolonial reactions to the play . . . Nunez, who is a master at pacing and plotting, explores the motivations behind Caliban’s outburst, hatching an entirely new story that is inspired by Shakespeare, but not beholden to him.” —New York Times Book Review “Masterful . . . simply wonderful . . . [an] exquisite retelling of The Tempest.” —Kirkus Reviews (starred review) “Absorbing . . . [Nunez] writes novels that resound with thunder and fury.” —Essence “A story about the transformative power of love . . . Readers are sure to enjoy the journey.” —Black Issues Book Review Prospero’s Daughter is a captivating recreation of Shakespeare’s The Tempest set on a verdant Caribbean island during the height of tensions between the native population and British colonists. Using Shakespeare’s play as a template to address questions of race, class, and power, Nunez turns an intimate eye to an unlikely bond formed between a boy and a girl of disparate backgrounds. When Peter Gardner’s ruthless medical genius leads him to experiment on his unwitting patients—often at the expense of their lives—he flees England, seeking an environ where his experiments might continue without scrutiny. He arrives with his three-year-old-daughter, Virginia, in Chacachacare, an isolated island off the coast of Trinidad, in the early 1960s. Gardner considers the locals to be nothing more than savages. He assumes ownership of the home of a servant boy named Carlos, seeing in him a suitable subject upon whom to continue his amoral medical work. Nonetheless, he educates the boy alongside Virginia. As Virginia and Carlos grow and come of age together, they form a covert relationship that violates the outdated mores of colonial rule. When Gardner unveils the pair’s relationship and accuses Carlos of a monstrous act, the investigation into the truth is left up to a curt, stonehearted British inspector, whose inquiries bring to light a horrendous secret. At turns epic and intimate, Prospero’s Daughter is one of the finest novels of the past two decades.
Boundaries
Author: Elizabeth Nunez
Publisher: Akashic Books
ISBN: 1617750727
Pages: 275
Year: 2011-09-27
View: 577
Read: 984
"Boundaries is told in spare and transcendent prose. [...] As always, Nunez delivers a unique and riveting perspective on Caribbean life as well as immigrant life in general." --The New York Amsterdam News "Many moments of elegant, overarching insight bind the personal to the collective past." --New York Times Book Review "If I wore a hat, I'd tip it to novelist Elizabeth Nunez . . . with Boundaries, her eighth work, the storyteller is in fine form . . . [it] is timely and provocative -- and it's written with such vivid prose that, despite the bittersweet ending, you'll step away from this refreshing take on contemporary publishing with a smile." --Essence "In Nunez's latest, the author further explores immigrant life, a life where a hard-working woman can progress up the corporate ladder, buy an apartment in a soon-to-be trendy neighborhood, and still be plagued by outsider’s angst . . . A thoughtful literary novel exploring the shadows of cultural identity and the mirage of assimilation." --Kirkus Reviews "A quiet, sensitive portrait. . . This work covers a lot of ground, from mother-daughter and male-female relationships to the tensions between immigrants and the American born." --Library Journal "Nunez deftly dissects the immigrant experience in light of cultural traditions that impact family roles, professional obligations, and romantic opportunities." --Booklist "Elizabeth Nunez is one of the finest and most necessary voices in contemporary American and Caribbean fiction." --Colum McCann, author of Let the Great World Spin In an age of reality TV, a husband and wife cling to Victorian notions of privacy, though doing so threatens the life of the wife. Their daughter Anna yearns for her mother's unguarded affection, and eventually learns there is value in restraint. But Anna, a Caribbean American immigrant, finds that lesson harder to accept when, eager to assimilate in her new country, she discovers that a gap yawns between her and American-born citizens. THE HEAD OF A SPECIALIZED IMPRINT at a major publishing house, Anna is soon challenged for her position by an ambitious upstart who accuses her of not really understanding American culture, particularly African American culture. Her job at stake, Anna turns for advice to her boyfriend Paul, a Caribbean American himself, who attempts to convince her that immigrants must accept limitations on their freedom in America. TOLD IN SPARE AND TRANSCENDENT PROSE, Boundaries is a riveting immigrant story, a fascinating look into the world of contemporary book publishing, a beautiful extension of the exploration of family dynamics that began in Nunez's previous novel Anna In-Between, and a heart-warming love story.
Deeper Shades of Purple
Author: Stacey M. Floyd-Thomas
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814727522
Pages: 331
Year: 2006-08-01
View: 1276
Read: 273
The second wave of feminism was one of the most significant political and cultural developments of the 1960s and 1970s. Yet the role radical feminism played within the women's movement remains hotly contested. For some, radical feminism has made a lasting contribution to our understanding of male privilege, and the ways the power imbalance between men and women affects the everyday fabric of women's lives. For others, radical feminism represents a reflexive hostility toward men, sex, and heterosexuality, and thus is best ignored or forgotten. Rather than have the movement be interpreted by others, Radical Feminism permits the original work of radical feminists to speak for itself. Comprised of pivotal documents written by U.S. radical feminists in the 1960s and 1970s, Radical Feminism combines both unpublished and previously published manifestos, position papers, minutes of meetings, and newsletters essential to an understanding of radical feminism. Consisting of documents unavailable to the general public, and others in danger of being lost altogether, this panoramic collection is organized around the key issues of sex and sexuality, race, children, lesbianism, separatism, and class. Barbara A. Crow rescues the groundbreaking original work of such groups as The Furies, Redstockings, Cell 16, and the Women's Liberation Movement. Contributors include Kate Millet, Susan Brownmiller, Shulamith Firestone, Rosalyn Baxandall, Toni Morrison, Ellen Willis, Anne Koett, and Vivan Gornick. Gathered for the first time in one volume, these primary sources of radical feminism fill a major gap in the literature on feminism and feminist thought. Radical Feminism is an indispensable resource for future generations of feminists, scholars, and activists. "This valuable anthology may well change the way many of us view radical feminism." --Resources for Feminist Research, Winter/Spring 2001, Vol. 28, No. 3/4
Lovers and Strangers
Author: Clair Wills
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141974966
Pages: 464
Year: 2017-08-31
View: 926
Read: 1076
TLS BOOKS OF THE YEAR 2017 'Generous and empathetic ... opens up postwar migration in all its richness' Sukhdev Sandhu, Guardian 'Groundbreaking, sophisticated, original, open-minded ... essential reading for anyone who wants to understand not only the transformation of British society after the war but also its character today' Piers Brendon, Literary Review 'Lyrical, full of wise and original observations' David Goodhart, The Times The battered and exhausted Britain of 1945 was desperate for workers - to rebuild, to fill the factories, to make the new NHS work. From all over the world and with many motives, thousands of individuals took the plunge. Most assumed they would spend just three or four years here, sending most of their pay back home, but instead large numbers stayed - and transformed the country. Drawing on an amazing array of unusual and surprising sources, Clair Wills' wonderful new book brings to life the incredible diversity and strangeness of the migrant experience. She introduces us to lovers, scroungers, dancers, homeowners, teachers, drinkers, carers and many more to show the opportunities and excitement as much as the humiliation and poverty that could be part of the new arrivals' experience. Irish, Bengalis, West Indians, Poles, Maltese, Punjabis and Cypriots battled to fit into an often shocked Britain and, to their own surprise, found themselves making permanent homes. As Britain picked itself up again in the 1950s migrants set about changing life in their own image, through music, clothing, food, religion, but also fighting racism and casual and not so casual violence. Lovers and Strangers is an extremely important book, one that is full of enjoyable surprises, giving a voice to a generation who had to deal with the reality of life surrounded by 'white strangers' in their new country.
Aluminum Dreams
Author: Mimi Sheller
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262026821
Pages: 367
Year: 2014-02-14
View: 284
Read: 182
How aluminum enabled a high-speed, gravity-defying American modernity even as other parts of the world paid the price in environmental damage and political turmoil.
Caribbean Spaces
Author: Carole Boyce Davies
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252095863
Pages: 256
Year: 2013-11-15
View: 1293
Read: 1011
Drawing on both personal experience and critical theory, Carole Boyce Davies illuminates the dynamic complexity of Caribbean culture and traces its migratory patterns throughout the Americas. Both a memoir and a scholarly study, Caribbean Spaces: Escapes from Twilight Zones explores the multivalent meanings of Caribbean space and community in a cross-cultural and transdisciplinary perspective. From her childhood in Trinidad and Tobago to life and work in communities and universities in Nigeria, Brazil, England, and the United States, Carole Boyce Davies portrays a rich and fluid set of personal experiences. She reflects on these movements to understand the interrelated dynamics of race, gender, and sexuality embedded in Caribbean spaces, as well as many Caribbean people's traumatic and transformative stories of displacement, migration, exile, and sometimes return. Ultimately, Boyce Davies reestablishes the connections between theory and practice, intellectual work and activism, and personal and private space.
The Pagoda
Author: Patricia Powell
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0156008297
Pages: 245
Year: 1999
View: 284
Read: 1184
Lowe, an immigrant who flees China in the 1890s to seek a better life in Jamaica, finds adventure, estrangement, scandal, and romance as he becomes the owner of a small shop and plays a role in the building of the Pagoda, a school where Chinese workers le