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From Polders to Postmodernism
Author: John Ridener
Publisher: Library Juice Press, LLC
ISBN: 0980200458
Pages: 184
Year: 2009
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"A history of the conception and development of the theories that have guided archivists in their work from the late 19th through the early 21st centuries"--Provided by publisher.
From Polders to Postmodernism
Author: John Ridener
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 400
Year: 2007
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Processing the Past
Author: Francis X. Blouin Jr., William G. Rosenberg
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199324026
Pages: 268
Year: 2012-12-18
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Processing the Past explores the dramatic changes taking place in historical understanding and archival management, and hence the relations between historians and archivists. Written by an archivist and a historian, it shows how these changes have been brought on by new historical thinking, new conceptions of archives, changing notions of historical authority, modifications in archival practices, and new information technologies. The book takes an "archival turn" by situating archives as subjects rather than places of study, and examining the increasingly problematic relationships between historical and archival work. By showing how nineteenth- and early twentieth-century historians and archivists in Europe and North America came to occupy the same conceptual and methodological space, the book sets the background to these changes. In the past, authoritative history was based on authoritative archives and mutual understandings of scientific research. These connections changed as historians began to ask questions not easily answered by traditional documentation, and archivists began to confront an unmanageable increase in the amount of material they processed and the challenges of new electronic technologies. The authors contend that historians and archivists have divided into two entirely separate professions with distinct conceptual frameworks, training, and purposes, as well as different understandings of the authorities that govern their work. Processing the Past moves toward bridging this divide by speaking in one voice to these very different audiences. Blouin and Rosenberg conclude by raising the worrisome question of what future historical archives might be like if historical scholars and archivists no longer understand each other, and indeed, whether their now different notions of what is archival and historical will ever again be joined.
The Silence of the Archive
Author: David Thomas, Simon Fowler, Valerie Johnson
Publisher: Facet Publishing
ISBN: 1783301554
Pages: 224
Year: 2017-05-11
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Foreword by Anne J Gilliland, University of California Evaluating archives in a post-truth society. In recent years big data initiatives, not to mention Hollywood, the video game industry and countless other popular media, have reinforced and even glamorized the public image of the archive as the ultimate repository of facts and the hope of future generations for uncovering ‘what actually happened’. The reality is, however, that for all sorts of reasons the record may not have been preserved or survived in the archive. In fact, the record may never have even existed – its creation being as imagined as is its contents. And even if it does exist, it may be silent on the salient facts, or it may obfuscate, mislead or flat out lie. The Silence of the Archive is written by three expert and knowledgeable archivists and draws attention to the many limitations of archives and the inevitability of their having parameters. Silences or gaps in archives range from details of individuals’ lives to records of state oppression or of intelligence operations. The book brings together ideas from a wide range of fields, including contemporary history, family history research and Shakespearian studies. It describes why these silences exist, what the impact of them is, how researchers have responded to them, and what the silence of the archive means for researchers in the digital age. It will help provide a framework and context to their activities and enable them to better evaluate archives in a post-truth society. This book includes discussion of: enforced silencesexpectations and when silence means silencedigital preservation, authenticity and the futuredealing with the silencepossible solutions; challenging silence and acceptancethe meaning of the silences: are things getting better or worse?user satisfaction and audience development. This book will make compelling reading for professional archivists, records managers and records creators, postgraduate and undergraduate students of history, archives, librarianship and information studies, as well as academics and other users of archives.
Digital Memory and the Archive
Author: Wolfgang Ernst
Publisher: Electronic Mediations
ISBN: 0816677662
Pages: 265
Year: 2013
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"Digital Memory and the Archive, the first English-language collection of the German media theorist's work, brings together essays that present Wolfgang Ernst's controversial materialist approach to media theory and history. His insights are central to the emerging field of media archaeology, which uncovers the role of specific technologies and mechanisms, rather than content, in shaping contemporary culture and society."--Pub. desc.
Encyclopedia of Archival Science
Author: Luciana Duranti, Patricia C. Franks
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 0810888114
Pages: 464
Year: 2015-06-17
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Here is the first-ever comprehensive guide to archival principles and practices. Encyclopedia of Archival Science features 130 entries which cover every aspect of the profession. These entries range from the traditional basics (like appraisal and provenance) to today’s necessities (digitization and digital curation).
Toward a Critical-Inclusive Assessment Practice for Library Instruction
Author: Lyda Fontes McCartin, Rachel Dineen
Publisher: Library Juice Press
ISBN: 1634000358
Pages: 162
Year: 2018-09
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"Offers academic librarians practical, and actionable, strategies for critical assessment of teaching and student learning"--Provided by publisher.
The Ethics of Memory in a Digital Age
Author: A. Ghezzi, Â. Pereira, Lucia Vesnic-Alujevic
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137428457
Pages: 143
Year: 2014-11-16
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This edited volume documents the current reflections on the 'Right to be Forgotten' and the interplay between the value of memory and citizen rights about memory. It provides a comprehensive analysis of problems associated with persistence of memory, the definition of identities (legal and social) and the issues arising for data management.
Identity Palimpsests
Author: Dominique Daniel, Amalia S. Levi
Publisher: Litwin Books Llc
ISBN: 1936117851
Pages: 326
Year: 2014-03-01
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Identity Palimpsests assesses the ways ethnic identities and other forms of belonging are affected by current practices in ethnic archiving. The book begins with an overview of the evolution of the ways ethnic organizations and communities have collected, preserved and provided access to their heritage. It then goes on to examine contemporary practices and theories in the context of a cultural heritage sector that is today defined by the digital medium and the Web. Institutions involved in ethnic archiving include libraries, archives and museums that document the history immigration and ethnicity in the United States and Canada. Archival science has long challenged the image of the archivist as a neutral guardian of the historical record and recognized her role as an active shaper of archives, but historians have yet to discuss implications for historical research. This book is designed to bring new theoretical insight into the impact of this challenge on ethnic archiving, to suggest ways historians are affected, and to begin to study implications for the archivist's practice. The book also innovates by exploring the impact that archivists have on the very ethnic identities they are trying to preserve. The book's intended audience includes cultural heritage professionals, iSchools and Library Science schools' students and faculty, and historians. While the book deals with heritage institutions in the U.S. and Canada, it appeals to an international audience.
The Archival Turn in Feminism
Author: Kate Eichhorn
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 1439909539
Pages: 190
Year: 2013-07-26
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In the 1990s, a generation of women born during the rise of the second wave feminist movement plotted a revolution. These young activists funneled their outrage and energy into creating music, and zines using salvaged audio equipment and stolen time on copy machines. By 2000, the cultural artifacts of this movement had started to migrate from basements and storage units to community and university archives, establishing new sites of storytelling and political activism. The Archival Turn in Feminism chronicles these important cultural artifacts and their collection, cataloging, preservation, and distribution. Cultural studies scholar Kate Eichhorn examines institutions such as the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture at Duke University, The Riot Grrrl Collection at New York University, and the Barnard Zine Library. She also profiles the archivists who have assembled these significant feminist collections. Eichhorn shows why young feminist activists, cultural producers, and scholars embraced the archive, and how they used it to stage political alliances across eras and generations. A volume in the American Literatures Initiative
Archive Stories
Author: Antoinette Burton
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822387042
Pages: 408
Year: 2006-01-04
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Despite the importance of archives to the profession of history, there is very little written about actual encounters with them—about the effect that the researcher’s race, gender, or class may have on her experience within them or about the impact that archival surveillance, architecture, or bureaucracy might have on the histories that are ultimately written. This provocative collection initiates a vital conversation about how archives around the world are constructed, policed, manipulated, and experienced. It challenges the claims to objectivity associated with the traditional archive by telling stories that illuminate its power to shape the narratives that are “found” there. Archive Stories brings together ethnographies of the archival world, most of which are written by historians. Some contributors recount their own experiences. One offers a moving reflection on how the relative wealth and prestige of Western researchers can gain them entry to collections such as Uzbekistan’s newly formed Central State Archive, which severely limits the access of Uzbek researchers. Others explore the genealogies of specific archives, from one of the most influential archival institutions in the modern West, the Archives nationales in Paris, to the significant archives of the Bakunin family in Russia, which were saved largely through the efforts of one family member. Still others explore the impact of current events on the analysis of particular archives. A contributor tells of researching the 1976 Soweto riots in the politically charged atmosphere of the early 1990s, just as apartheid in South Africa was coming to an end. A number of the essays question what counts as an archive—and what counts as history—as they consider oral histories, cyberspace, fiction, and plans for streets and buildings that were never built, for histories that never materialized. Contributors. Tony Ballantyne, Marilyn Booth, Antoinette Burton, Ann Curthoys, Peter Fritzsche, Durba Ghosh, Laura Mayhall, Jennifer S. Milligan, Kathryn J. Oberdeck, Adele Perry, Helena Pohlandt-McCormick, John Randolph, Craig Robertson, Horacio N. Roque Ramírez, Jeff Sahadeo, Reneé Sentilles
Change!
Author: Gabriele Bammer
Publisher: ANU Press
ISBN: 192502265X
Pages: 332
Year: 2015-07-16
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Change happens all the time, so why is driving particular change generally so hard? Why are the outcomes often unpredictable? Are some types of change easier to achieve than others? Are some techniques for achieving change more effective than others? How can change that is already in train be stopped or deflected? Knowledge about change is fragmented and there is nowhere in the academic or practice worlds that provides comprehensive answers to these and other questions. Every discipline and practice area has only a partial view and there is not even a map of those different perspectives. The purpose of this book is to begin the task of developing a comprehensive approach to change by gathering a variety of viewpoints from the academic and practice worlds.
Information First
Author: Elaine Evernden, Roger Evernden
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136395695
Pages: 256
Year: 2012-06-25
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Information is seriously undervalued and underused as a corporate resource. The pressures of global competition and a growing dependence on information technology mean that the effective use of information is more important now than it has ever been. This book is a fundamental guide for unleashing information potential, by combining the discipline of information architecture with the power of knowledge management, to drive organizational changes. Instead of unlocking the potential of information, people are drowning in detail. Current books only approach this subject from an information technology perspective. This book combines techniques from knowledge management and information architecture to provide a layer above the detail - techniques for seeing the big picture.
Paper Cadavers
Author: Kirsten Weld
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 082237658X
Pages: 352
Year: 2014-02-26
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In Paper Cadavers, an inside account of the astonishing discovery and rescue of Guatemala's secret police archives, Kirsten Weld probes the politics of memory, the wages of the Cold War, and the stakes of historical knowledge production. After Guatemala's bloody thirty-six years of civil war (1960–1996), silence and impunity reigned. That is, until 2005, when human rights investigators stumbled on the archives of the country's National Police, which, at 75 million pages, proved to be the largest trove of secret state records ever found in Latin America. The unearthing of the archives renewed fierce debates about history, memory, and justice. In Paper Cadavers, Weld explores Guatemala's struggles to manage this avalanche of evidence of past war crimes, providing a firsthand look at how postwar justice activists worked to reconfigure terror archives into implements of social change. Tracing the history of the police files as they were transformed from weapons of counterinsurgency into tools for post-conflict reckoning, Weld sheds light on the country's fraught transition from war to an uneasy peace, reflecting on how societies forget and remember political violence.
Archives
Author: Sue McKemmish, Michael Piggott, Barbara Reed, Frank Upward
Publisher: Elsevier
ISBN: 1780634161
Pages: 368
Year: 2005-06-01
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Archives: Recordkeeping in Society introduces the significance of archives and the results of local and international research in archival science. It explores the role of recordkeeping in various cultural, organisational and historical contexts. Its themes include archives as a web of recorded information: new information technologies have presented dilemmas, but also potentialities for managing of the interconnectedness of archives. Another theme is the relationship between evidence and memory in archives and in archival discourse. It also explores recordkeeping and accountability, memory, societal power and juridical power, along with an examination of issues raised by globalisation and interntionalisation. The chapter authors are researchers, practitioners and educators from leading Australian and international recordkeeping organisations, each contributing previously unpublished research in and reflections on their field of expertise. They include Adrian Cunningham, Don Schauder, Hans Hofman, Chris Hurley, Livia Iacovino, Eric Ketelaar and Ann Pederson. The book reflects broad Australian and international perspectives making it relevant worldwide. It will be a particularly valuable resource for students of archives and records, researchers from realted knowledge disciplines, sociology and history, practitioners wanting to reflect further on their work, and all those with an interest in archives and their role in shaping human activity and community culture.

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