Four Princes Henry Viii Francis I Charles V Suleiman The Magnificent And The Obsessions That Forged Modern Europe Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Four Princes
Author: John Julius Norwich
Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
ISBN: 0802189466
Pages: 304
Year: 2017-04-04
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John Julius Norwich—“the very model of a popular historian” (Wall Street Journal)—is acclaimed for his distinctive ability to weave together a fascinating narrative through vivid detail, colorful anecdotes, and captivating characters. Here, he has crafted a bold tapestry of Europe and the Middle East in the early sixteenth century, when four legendary rulers towered over the era. Francis I of France was the personification of the Renaissance, and a highly influential patron of the arts and education. Henry VIII, who was not expected to inherit the throne but embraced the role with gusto, broke with the Roman Catholic Church and appointed himself head of the Church of England. Charles V was the most powerful industrious man of the time, and was unanimously elected Holy Roman Emperor. Suleiman the Magnificent—who stood apart as a Muslim—brought the Ottoman Empire to its apogee of political, military, and economic power. Against the vibrant background of the Renaissance, these four men collectively shaped the culture, religion, and politics of their respective domains. With remarkable erudition, John Julius Norwich delves into this entertaining and layered history, indelibly depicting four dynamic characters and how their incredible achievements—and obsessions with one another—changed European history.
Four Princes
Author: John Julius Norwich
Publisher: Grove Press
ISBN: 0802128092
Pages: 304
Year: 2018-04-17
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Renowned historian John Julius Norwich has created a brilliant portrait of four dynamic rulers--all born in the last decade of the 15th century--who collectively shaped modern Europe and the Middle East
Four Princes
Author: John Julius Norwich
Publisher: Atlantic Monthly Press
ISBN: 0802126634
Pages: 304
Year: 2017-04-04
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In Europe, 1491 to 1500 was an exciting time to be alive. The entire continent was overshadowed by four rulers, all born within a ten-year period: King Francis I of France, the most interesting of the quartet, bursting with energy and swagger, was a great patron of the arts and the personification of the Renaissance. King Henry VIII of England--who was not born to be king but embraced the role with gusto--broke with the Roman Catholic Church, and made himself head of the Church of England. Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, the most powerful man in the civilized world, obsessed with the religious disputes of Europe, was leader of the Spanish and then Roman Empire. Suleiman the Magnificent, the richest of them all, stands apart as a Muslim, who brought the Ottoman Empire to its apogee of political, military, and economic power, as well as to the golden age of its artistic and architectural prowess. Never before had humankind seen such giants coexisting. Against the rich background of the Renaissance, they laid the foundation for modern Europe. Individually, each man could hardly have been more different. Their mutual relations shifted constantly: often they were actively hostile and occasionally they were friendly. There was a healthy respect between them; never did one make the mistake of underestimating another. And together, they dominated the world stage.
The Reign of Charles V
Author: William S. Maltby
Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education
ISBN: 1137159545
Pages: 176
Year: 2002-03-25
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Why should we remember the reign of Charles V? What happened in those years that altered the course of history and helped to shape the world we live in today? Few ages have been more important to the history of Europe and America than the reign of Charles V. Charles ruled the first truly global empire, his sovereignty extending beyond Spain to the Netherlands, much of Italy, the Americas, and the Holy Roman Empire. His life saw the waning of the Renaissance, the religious transformation of Europe by the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, and the emergence of Spain as a leading international power. At the same time, the conquests of Mexico and Peru, the establishment of a Habsburh empirein eastern Europe, and a series of wars with France, the Ottoman Empire and the German Protestants transformed European politics and the global economy. William Maltby's engaging new study not only looks at Charles V as a person, but also examines important critical issues: the emperor's policies and their consequences; the institional, economic and intellectual development of his various realms; and his military and diplomatic struggles. Concise and readable, it provides students and the general reader with an indispensable introduction to a reign that defies historical comparison, and an era that changed the world.
Empress of the East
Author: Leslie Peirce
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465093094
Pages: 368
Year: 2017-09-19
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The extraordinary story of the Russian slave girl Roxelana, who rose from concubine to become the only queen of the Ottoman empire In Empress of the East, historian Leslie Peirce tells the remarkable story of a Christian slave girl, Roxelana, who was abducted by slave traders from her Ruthenian homeland and brought to the harem of Sultan Suleyman the Magnificent in Istanbul. Suleyman became besotted with her and foreswore all other concubines. Then, in an unprecedented step, he freed her and married her. The bold and canny Roxelana soon became a shrewd diplomat and philanthropist, who helped Suleyman keep pace with a changing world in which women, from Isabella of Hungary to Catherine de Medici, increasingly held the reins of power. Until now Roxelana has been seen as a seductress who brought ruin to the empire, but in Empress of the East, Peirce reveals the true history of an elusive figure who transformed the Ottoman harem into an institution of imperial rule.
Defenders of the Faith
Author: James Reston
Publisher: Marshall Cavendish
ISBN: 1594202257
Pages: 407
Year: 2009
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Describes the events surrounding the clash between Charles V, the Holy Roman Emperor, and Sèuleyman I, the Sultan of the Turks and their battle for supremacy in Europe.
A History of France
Author: John Julius Norwich
Publisher: Atlantic Monthly Press
ISBN: 0802146708
Pages:
Year: 2018-10-02
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John Julius Norwich—called a “true master of narrative history” by Simon Sebag Montefiore—returns with the book he has spent his distinguished career wanting to write, A History of France: a portrait of the past two centuries of the country he loves best. Beginning with Julius Caesar’s conquest of Gaul in the first century BC, this study of French history comprises a cast of legendary characters—Charlemagne, Louis XIV, Napoleon, Joan of Arc and Marie Antionette, to name a few—as Norwich chronicles France’s often violent, always fascinating history. From the French Revolution—after which neither France, nor the world, would be the same again—to the storming of the Bastille, from the Vichy regime and the Resistance to the end of the Second World War, A History of France is packed with heroes and villains, battles and rebellion, stories so enthralling that Norwich declared, “I can honestly say that I have never enjoyed writing a book more.” With his celebrated stylistic panache and expert command of detail, Norwich writes in an inviting, intimate tone, and with a palpable affection for France. One of our greatest contemporary historians has deftly crafted a comprehensive yet concise portrait of the country's historical sweep.
The Popes
Author: Viscount John Julius Norwich
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 144646850X
Pages: 528
Year: 2011-05-31
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John Julius Norwich examines the oldest continuing institution in the world, tracing the papal line down the centuries from St Peter (traditionally - but by no means historically - the first Pope) to the present. Of the 280-odd holders of the supreme office, some have unquestionably been saints; others have wallowed in unspeakable iniquity. One was said to have been a woman, her sex being revealed only when she improvidently gave birth to a baby during a papal procession. Almost as shocking was Formosus whose murdered corpse was exhumed, clothed in pontifical vestments, propped up on a throne and subjected to trial. From the glories of Byzantium to the decay of Rome, from the Albigensian Heresy to controversy within the Church today, The Popes is superbly written, witty and revealing.
Absolute Monarchs
Author: John Julius Norwich
Publisher: Random House Incorporated
ISBN: 0812978846
Pages: 512
Year: 2012-05
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A comprehensive history of the papacy by the legendary British historian and author of the three-volume Byzantium series describes the defining relevance of papal authority to the Church, chronicling the unexpectedly violent and colorful historical events that have indelibly shaped the Pope's authority and station. Reprint. A best-selling book.
Francis I
Author: Leonie Frieda
Publisher: Weidenfeld & Nicolson
ISBN: 1474605583
Pages: 512
Year: 2018-03-08
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Francis I (1494-1547) was inconstant, amorous, hot-headed and flawed. Yet he was also arguably the most significant king that France ever had. This is his story. A contemporary of Henry VIII of England, Francis saw himself as the first Renaissance king, a man who was the exemplar of courtly and civilised behaviour throughout Europe. A courageous and heroic warrior, he was also a keen aesthete, an accomplished diplomat and an energetic ruler who turned his country into a force to be reckoned with. Yet he was also capricious, vain and arrogant, taking hugely unnecessary risks, at least one of which nearly resulted in the end of his kingdom. His great feud with his nemesis Charles V, the Holy Roman Emperor, defined European diplomacy and sovereignty, but his notorious alliance with the great Ottoman ruler Suleiman the Magnificent threatened to destroy everything. With access to never-before-seen private archives, Leonie Frieda's comprehensive and sympathetic account explores the life of the most human of all Renaissance monarchs - and the most enigmatic.
Game of Queens
Author: Sarah Gristwood
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465096794
Pages: 384
Year: 2016-11-29
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"Sarah Gristwood has written a masterpiece that effortlessly and enthrallingly interweaves the amazing stories of women who ruled in Europe during the Renaissance period."--Alison Weir Sixteenth-century Europe saw an explosion of female rule. From Isabella of Castile, and her granddaughter Mary Tudor, to Catherine de Medici, Anne Boleyn, and Elizabeth Tudor, these women wielded enormous power over their territories, shaping the course of European history for over a century. Across boundaries and generations, these royal women were mothers and daughters, mentors and protégées, allies and enemies. For the first time, Europe saw a sisterhood of queens who would not be equaled until modern times. A fascinating group biography and a thrilling political epic, Game of Queens explores the lives of some of the most beloved (and reviled) queens in history.
The End of Europe
Author: James Kirchick
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300227787
Pages: 256
Year: 2017-03-07
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Once the world’s bastion of liberal, democratic values, Europe is now having to confront demons it thought it had laid to rest. The old pathologies of anti-Semitism, populist nationalism, and territorial aggression are threatening to tear the European postwar consensus apart. In riveting dispatches from this unfolding tragedy, James Kirchick shows us the shallow disingenuousness of the leaders who pushed for “Brexit;” examines how a vast migrant wave is exacerbating tensions between Europeans and their Muslim minorities; explores the rising anti-Semitism that causes Jewish schools and synagogues in France and Germany to resemble armed bunkers; and describes how Russian imperial ambitions are destabilizing nations from Estonia to Ukraine. With President Trump now threatening to abandon America's traditional role as upholder of the liberal world order and guarantor of the continent's security, Europe may be alone in dealing with these unprecedented challenges. Based on extensive firsthand reporting, this book is a provocative, disturbing look at a continent in unexpected crisis.
The Great Cities in History
Author: John Julius Norwich
Publisher: Thames & Hudson
ISBN: 0500773599
Pages: 304
Year: 2016-08-02
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A portrait of world civilization told through the stories of the world's greatest cities from ancient times to the present. Today, for the first time in history, the majority of people in the world live in cities. The implications and challenges associated with this fact are enormous. But how did we get here? From the origins of urbanization in Mesopotamia to the global metropolises of today, great cities have marked the development of human civilization. The Great Cities in History tells their stories, starting with the earliest, from Uruk and Memphis to Jerusalem and Alexandria. Next come the fabulous cities of the first millennium: Damascus and Baghdad, Teotihuacan and Tikal, and Chang’an, capital of Tang Dynasty China. The medieval world saw the rise of powerful cities such as Palermo and Paris in Europe, Benin in Africa, and Angkor in southeast Asia. The last two sections bring us from the early modern world, with Isfahan, Agra, and Amsterdam, to the contemporary city: London and New York, Tokyo and Barcelona, Los Angeles and Sao Paulo. The distinguished contributors, including Jan Morris, Michael D. Coe, Simon Schama, Orlando Figes, Felipe Fernandez-Armesto, Misha Glenny, Susan Toby Evans, and A. N. Wilson, evoke the character of each place—people, art and architecture, government—and explain the reasons for its success.
Shakespeare's Kings
Author: John Julius Norwich
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0743200314
Pages: 432
Year: 2001-03-13
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Compares the historical kings with their portrayal in Shakespeare's plays
The Elements of Landscape Oil Painting
Author: Suzanne Brooker
Publisher: Watson-Guptill
ISBN: 0804137560
Pages: 208
Year: 2015-08-18
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A landscape painting guide for oil painters that breaks landscapes down into component elements from nature, and showcases tools and techniques used by classic and modern oil painters for bringing these scenes to life. Landscape painting is one of the most popular subjects for painters working in the medium of oils--from classic masters to contemporary artists. In The Elements of Landscape Oil Painting, established Watson-Guptill author and noted instructor/painter Suzanne Brooker presents the fundamentals necessary for mastering landscape oil painting, breaking landscapes down into component parts: sky, terrain, trees, and water. Each featured element builds off the previous, with additional lessons on the latest brushes, paints, and other tools used by artists. Key methods like observation, rendering, and color mixing are supported by demonstration paintings and samples from a variety of the best landscape oil painters of all time. With The Elements of Landscape Oil Painting, oil painters looking to break into landscape painting or enhance their work will find all the necessary ingredients for success.