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Cascading Style Sheets
Author: Eric A. Meyer
Publisher: "O'Reilly Media, Inc."
ISBN: 0596005253
Pages: 507
Year: 2004
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Demonstrates the control and flexibility Cascading Style Sheets bring to Web design, covering selectors and structure, units, text manipulation, colors, backgrounds, borders, visual formatting, and positioning.
Cascading Style Sheets
Author: Hakon Wium Lie, Bert Bos
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional
ISBN: 0132465736
Pages: 416
Year: 2005-04-25
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In this updated edition to their original best-selling classic, the co-creators of CSS clearly, logically, and painlessly explain the hows and whys and ins and outs of the visual formatting language that is their gift to us. The Web would be a poorer place without Messieurs Bos and Lie. Your shelf will be richer for the addition of this book. Rely on it. Study it. Savor it. The Indispensible CSS Tutorial and Reference–Straight from the Creators of CSS Direct from the creators of CSS, this is the definitive guide to CSS, today's indispensable standard for controlling the appearance of any Web or XML document. This book doesn't just show how to use every significant CSS 1 and 2.x feature; it carefully explains the "why" behind today's most valuable CSS design techniques. You'll find practical, downloadable examples throughout–along with essential browser support information and best practices for building high-impact pages and applications. Cascading Style Sheets: Designing for the Web, Third Edition covers every CSS 2.1 improvement and fix, from new height/width definitions in absolutely positioned elements to new clip property calculations. Clear, readable, and thorough, it's the one must-have CSS resource for every Web developer, designer, and content provider. Coverage includes Mastering essential CSS concepts: Rules, declarations, selectors, properties, and more Working with type: From absolute/relative units to font size and weight Understanding CSS objects: Box model, display properties, list styles, and more Exercising total control over spacing and positioning Specifying colors for borders and backgrounds Managing printing: Margins, page breaks, and more Implementing media-specific style sheets for audio rendering, handhelds, and other forms of presentation Moving from HTML extensions to CSS: Five practical case studies Making the most of cascading and inheritance Using external style sheets and @import Integrating CSS with XML documents Optimizing the performance of CSS pages Includes a handy CSS Quick Reference printed on the inside covers
Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) by Example
Author: Steven E. Callihan
Publisher: Que Publishing
ISBN: 0789726173
Pages: 461
Year: 2002
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Reviews Web design fundamentals while reviewing the capabilities of Cascading Style Sheets and their impact upon Web design.
Cascading Style Sheets
Author: Molly E. Holzschlag
Publisher: Sybex
ISBN: 0782141846
Pages: 274
Year: 2003-04-08
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CSS is finally supported by all modern web browsers, empowering Web designers to do what they've been hungering to do for years: control layout more precisely, use color more effectively, and expand typographic options beyond the frustrating limitations of the past. So where to begin? Where can you get design-focused instruction on CSS while learning the technical details? Cascading Style Sheets: The Designer's Edge is precisely the resource you've been looking for. Written by renowned web designer Molly Holzschlag, this book begins with an in-depth look at structured markup, both XHTML and CSS. It then explains how to use CSS to achieve specific design goals involving typography, color, layout, and more. Finally, it deconstructs a series of impressive designs, showing you how the authors used CSS to maximize their efficiency and get exactly the right effect. Key topics you'll learn about include: * Writing valid XHTML * Authoring effective CSS rules * Working with classes and IDs * Validating your CSS * Creating great typographical designs with CSS * Using CSS for backgrounds, borders, and color * Creating multiple link styles * Using absolute positioning * Working with relative positioning * Positioning with float * Creating great CSS layouts
Professional CSS
Author: Christopher Schmitt
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0470383100
Pages: 301
Year: 2008-08-04
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Core CSS
Author: Keith Schengili-Roberts
Publisher: Prentice Hall Professional
ISBN: 0130092789
Pages: 818
Year: 2004
View: 987
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Preface Welcome to the second edition of Core CSS. When the initial edition came out in 2000, while CSS had been around for a few years, it was largely underutilized on the Web. And there was a good reason for this: browser support for CSS properties was, to put it kindly, "spotty." In the past few years things have changed substantially: the Mozilla project pushed for a standards-compliant rendering engine—including CSS—that has since been incorporated into the most recent versions of Netscape Navigator; and Internet Explorer 5.0 and later 6.0 made real advances in supporting CSS properties. As older, non-CSS-compliant browsers fade into the background, Web design has advanced accordingly and is beginning to take full advantage of the formatting possibilities that CSS opens up for both eye-popping and better functioning Web sites. While the browser manufacturers have been playing "catch-up" and have largely (with some notable exceptions) instituted the CSS1 and CSS2 standards devised by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), the W3C has not stood still. While still in draft status, the various modules that will one day comprise the CSS3 specification are well on the way towards providing a comprehensive set of tools for Web authors seeking to format just about anything and everything you can think of that has to do with a Web page. While none of these CSS3 modules have been finalized—and things may still change substantially—many of the new directions that are being charted by the W3C in this area are covered in this book as a "heads up" as to what future Web developers can come to expect. One of the original reasons behind the creation of CSS was to prevent competing browsers developers from the runaway development of new HTML tags that only worked in their particular browser. This has seemingly not stopped the temptation by browser manufacturers to continue to "push the envelope," and in particular, recent versions of Microsoft's Internet Explorer have included a number of browser-specific CSS properties. These are covered in the various sections of the book, both out of a sense of completeness as well as wanting to provide readers who may be working in a "closed-shop" environment (i.e., where they know that their clients are all using this browser) with information they can genuinely use. As a member of the W3C, Microsoft is also helping to chart the progress of the future CSS development, and many as yet browser-specific CSS properties may not be so in the future. When I am asked why I write computer books, I usually respond that I write books I wished already existed that I could use daily in my work. A number of books have appeared since the first edition of Core CSS came out, but none of them have been as comprehensive—especially when it came to covering CSS2 or Internet Explorer properties—as I would have liked. The majority of the code in the first book has been completely re-written for this edition, and dozens more examples better show what particular CSS properties can do and how they work—or do not work—in modern browsers. Who You Are You are a Web author who is looking to expand the capabilities of your Web pages. You know that CSS opens the doors to a wide range of possibilities, but want to learn more about how to make the most of it. Or perhaps you know that CSS will solve some of your most pernicious Web formatting problems, but shy away from using it because you have heard that it can produce varying results when viewed under different browsers or under different operating systems. Maybe you are looking for a single source that tells you what you need to know about a property at a glance, instead of having to traverse a dozen Web sites to get the same information. If you fit any of these circumstances, then this book is for you. This book takes a practical, pragmatic look at the current state of affairs regarding CSS and guides the reader through how CSS works. This book provides the information Web authors need in order to understand not only how CSS should work, but also how it actually works in current major browsers. It does not confine itself only to one operating system, but takes a look at how CSS works under browsers working under multiple operating systems. With this knowledge, Web authors will know which CSS properties are "safe" for use, and which to avoid. More than that though, this book also provides information as to the future of CSS with an in-depth look at what will likely prove to be the foundation of the future CSS3 specification. You do not have to be an expert at understanding how Web pages work, but the book does assume you have a basic understanding of both HTML and the Web. The book assumes no prior knowledge of CSS. It will not only serve those Web authors who are just starting out using CSS, but also act as a handy reference for those occasions when you need to look up how a particular CSS property works. How This Book Is Organized The first edition of this book separated CSS1 and CSS2 properties. Now that much of CSS2 has been adopted within the major browsers, it no longer made sense to keep things separate. This has been extended further to include draft CSS3 properties into the (sometimes rough) families of properties to which they belong. While these properties are not currently in use—and some of them may not end up looking the same as they do in this book when they are finally released—they are important as an indicator of the way CSS development is progressing, so that forwardlooking Web authors can get a heads up. The CSS3 properties outlined here are my "best guesses" based on my own Web-authoring experience. In some cases there are wholly separate chapters devoted to Internet Explorer-only CSS properties, but many of them fall into already-defined families of properties and are included in those chapters. In addition to all of the chapters in this book are some appendices designed to provide the Web author with quick reference material to have on hand when writing CSS code. Chapter 1 ("The Birth of CSS") explores how CSS in its current form came to be. The following two chapters (Chapter 2, "(X)HTML and Its Relationship to CSS" and Chapter 3, "Browser Adoption of CSS") provide information on how CSS can be accessed within Web page code, and how the major browser manufacturers have increasingly adopted CSS within their browsers. Chapter 4 ("Implementation of Basic CSS Concepts") looks at how some of the basic concepts behind CSS—such as inheritance, grouping CSS code and cascading rules—are implemented in the major browsers. Chapters 5 and 6 ("The Cascade" and "CSS Units," respectively) extend this concept further by looking at how the "C" of "CSS" works, and explains the many different fundamental units of measure that can be used in conjunction with certain CSS properties. Chapter 7 ("Pseudo-Classes and Pseudo-Elements") looks at how these CSS elements which allow for special or conditional types of formatting can be utilized. Chapter 8 ("Media Types and Media Queries") introduces the concept of media types and examines how Web pages can be modified so that they can be displayed through such things as print or "talking browsers." Chapters 9 and 10 ("Font Properties" and "Text Properties") begin the "meat and potatoes" part of the book for most readers, looking in detail at the properties used daily by an increasing number of Web authors. Chapter 11 ("Text Property Extensions") is the first chapter devoted wholly to Internet Explorer-specific properties, most of which are aimed at formatting Web pages for an international audience. Chapter 12 ("Box Properties") brings us back to the "meat and potatoes" area of CSS formatting, explaining in detail the box set CSS properties, which can determine how a wide variety of Web elements such as headers, images and paragraphs can be enhanced. The topic of Chapter 13 ("Color") used to be part of the background family of properties, but the draft CSS3 module has charted a new course for using color on the Web, all of which is looked at in this section. Background properties—including a number of draft CSS innovations in this area—are covered in Chapter 14 ("Background Properties"). Chapter 15 ("Classification Properties and Generated/Automatic Content") is the start of what for many readers will be the more esoteric uses to which CSS can be put to, and yet represents much of where the real rendering power behind CSS lies. This chapter looks at how its functions enable Web authors to control and enhance content that is automatically generated by the browser, including such things as the numbering and display of lists. Chapter 16 ("Visual Formatting and Detailed Visual Formatting") represents the core of what is popularly known as the "CSS positioning" properties. Chapter 17 ("Visual Effects") looks primarily at properties designed to produce stunning effects using dynamic code. Chapter 18 ("Paged Media") explores those properties related to crafting Web pages so that they can be printed (rather than displayed on a screen) in the precise way that a Web author desires. Chapter 19 ("Tables") looks at the somewhat rag-tag collection of table-related formatting properties, but then rounds off the chapter by looking at ways of creating table-like formatting structures using only CSS. In addition to covering what is already possible to do with user-interface properties in Chapter 20 ("User Interface")—such as providing greater control over the display of such things as cursors and the outlines that surround buttons or text fields in forms that denote a "focus" for user input—it also includes an extensive preview as to how you can affect the functionality of Web pages when now-draft CSS3 properties become available. Mastering the properties covered in these sections guarantees that you will be at the forefront of CSS-based Web design. Chapter 21 ("Aural Cascading Style Sheets") begins a section of the book covering either under-implemented CSS properties or those specific to working with a particular browser. This chapter explores a relatively new class of properties designed to enable the Web author to determine how a Web page could be spoken aloud by a browser with speech capabilities—sadly, this is poorly implemented in the major browsers. Chapter 22 ("Ruby") looks at the properties used in formatting a particular type of Chinese text layout; these properties are specific to Internet Explorer but are now being actively considered by the W3C for inclusion in the future CSS3 specification. Columnar layout properties, based in part on some old browser-specific HTML tags in Netscape Navigator, are explored in Chapter 23 ("Multi-Column Layout"). Chapter 24 ("Scrollbars") briefly looks at some properties designed to change the appearance of scrollbars specific to recent versions of Internet Explorer. The final chapter (Chapter 25 "Filters and Transitions") is a sizable one devoted to Internet Explorer's CSS-based way of adding some interesting and often dynamic visual effects. Appendix A is a CSS compatibility chart, looking at all of the "Safe," "Unsafe" and "Partial"-ly implemented CSS1 and CSS2 properties for various versions of the browsers Web authors are likely to run into. Appendix B provides an alphabetical listing of all CSS1, CSS2 and Internet Explorer CSS properties (minus the admittedly oddball filter and transition properties) as a quick reference. Appendix C looks at the CSS3 Mobile Profile and contains properties that are expected to be implemented in scaled-down browsers intended for use while "on the go."
Beginning CSS
Author: Ian Pouncey, Richard York
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118121783
Pages: 480
Year: 2011-05-25
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Completely updated material and new examples show you what CSS can do With the latest versions of Firefox, Safari, Internet Explorer, and other browsers released, CSS is more essential than ever. This beginner guide demonstrates how cascading style sheets can be used to define styles to items in Web pages, rather than format each item individually. Each lesson in this full-color book has been methodically revised to be more concise and efficient, making your learning experience as productive as possible. Covers the latest in CSS, including the new features of Internet Explorer, Firefox, Safari, and Google Chrome Reviews the vast improvements to mobile browsers and how CSS can work with them Provides helpful examples and walks you through real-world solutions to common hurdles Discusses embedded fonts, compatibility tables, and cross-browser bug scenarios Beginning CSS, Third Edition gets you completely up to date so that you can start using CSS in the newest Web and mobile browsers today!
CSS Hacks and Filters
Author: Joseph Lowery
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0764599976
Pages: 292
Year: 2005-05-27
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Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) is a method of describing how a Web page should look in a Web browser, but a growing number of browsers do not support CSS in the same way, forcing developers to constantly play catch-up to keep their sites consistent Bestselling author Joe Lowery eases the pain for those Web developers who aren't feeling the CSS love-he guides readers through real-world workarounds that will help a CSS-based site look and work the way it was meant to Readers will grit their teeth, clench their fists, and roll their eyes for the last time once they learn how to craft fluid multi-column layouts, build interactive navigation, fix the Box Model, implement CSS hacks in Dreamweaver, and more cool tricks
Cascading Style Sheets 2.0 Programmer's Reference
Author: Eric Meyer
Publisher: McGraw Hill Professional
ISBN: 0072131780
Pages: 334
Year: 2001-03-20
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The most authoritative quick reference available for CSS programmers. This handy resource gives you programming essentials at your fingertips, including all the new tags and features in CSS 2.0. You'll get concise information on designing and deploying complex style sheets as well as details on browser support.
Cascading Style Sheets FAQ
Author:
Publisher: One Percent Better
ISBN: 1907863125
Pages:
Year:
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Cascading Style Sheets Complete
Author: David D. Busch, J. W. Olsen
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Companies
ISBN: 0079137032
Pages: 424
Year: 1998-01-01
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Teaches Web programmers to use Cascading Style Sheets to modify the design elements--such as typography, color, type sizes, and styles--of Web sites for a more creative look. Original. (All Users).
CSS Cookbook
Author: Christopher Schmitt
Publisher: "O'Reilly Media, Inc."
ISBN: 0596554680
Pages: 544
Year: 2006-10-17
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As the industry standard method for enriching the presentation of HTML-based web pages, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) allow you to give web pages more structure and a more sophisticated look. But first, you have to get past CSS theory and resolve real-world problems. For those all-too-common dilemmas that crop up with each project, CSS Cookbook provides hundreds of practical examples with CSS code recipes that you can use immediately to format your web pages. Arranged in a quick-lookup format for easy reference, the second edition has been updated to explain the unique behavior of the latest browsers: Microsoft's IE 7 and Mozilla's Firefox 1.5. Also, the book has been expanded to cover the interaction of CSS and images and now includes more recipes for beginning CSS users. The explanation that accompanies each recipe enables you to customize the formatting for your specific needs. With topics that range from basic web typography and page layout to techniques for formatting lists, forms, and tables, this book is a must-have companion, regardless of your experience with Cascading Style Sheets.
CSS: The Definitive Guide
Author: Eric A. Meyer, Estelle Weyl
Publisher: "O'Reilly Media, Inc."
ISBN: 1449325092
Pages: 1090
Year: 2017-10-16
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If you’re a web designer or app developer interested in sophisticated page styling, improved accessibility, and saving time and effort, this book is for you. This revised edition provides a comprehensive guide to CSS implementation, along with a thorough review of the latest CSS specifications. CSS is a constantly evolving language for describing the presentation of web content on screen, printers, speech synthesizers, screen readers, and chat windows. It is used by all browsers on all screen sizes on all types of IoT devices, including phones, computers, video games, televisions, watches, kiosks, and auto consoles. Authors Eric Meyer and Estelle Weyl show you how to improve user experience, speed development, avoid potential bugs, and add life and depth to your applications through layout, transitions and animations, borders, backgrounds, text properties, and many other tools and techniques. This guide covers: Selectors, specificity, and the cascade Values, units, fonts, and text properties Padding, borders, outlines, and margins Colors, backgrounds, and gradients Floats and positioning tricks Flexible box layout The new Grid layout system 2D and 3D transforms, transitions, and animation Filters, blending, clipping, and masking Media and feature queries
CSS: The Missing Manual
Author: David Sawyer McFarland
Publisher: "O'Reilly Media, Inc."
ISBN: 1491918012
Pages: 718
Year: 2015-08-13
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CSS lets you create professional-looking websites, but learning its finer points can be tricky—even for seasoned web developers. This fully updated edition provides the most modern and effective tips, tricks, and tutorial-based instruction on CSS available today. Learn how to use new tools such as Flexbox and Sass to build web pages that look great and run fast on any desktop or mobile device. Ideal for casual and experienced designers alike. The important stuff you need to know: Start with the basics. Write CSS-friendly HTML, including the HTML5 tags recognized by today’s browsers. Design for mobile devices. Create web pages that look great when visitors use them on the go. Make your pages work for you. Add animations that capture the imagination, and forms that get the job done. Take control of page layouts. Use professional design techniques such as floats and positioning. Make your layouts more flexible. Design websites with Flexbox that adjust to different devices and screen sizes. Work more efficiently. Write less CSS code and work with smaller files, using Syntactically Awesome Stylesheets (Sass).
Enduring CSS
Author: Ben Frain
Publisher: Packt Publishing Ltd
ISBN: 1787284530
Pages: 134
Year: 2017-01-17
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Learn to really THINK about CSS, and how to create CSS that endures continual iteration, multiple authors, and yet always produces predictable results About This Book Address the problems of CSS at scale, avoiding the shortfalls of scaling CSS. The shortfalls of conventional approaches to scaling CSS. Develop consistent and enforceable selector naming conventions with ECSS. Learn how to organize project structure to more easily isolate and decouple visual components. Who This Book Is For This is a book for working CSS authors involved in large projects. This is a book that tackles create enduring CSS for large-scale projects. What You Will Learn The problems of CSS at scale—specificity, the cascade and styles intrinsically tied to element structure. The shortfalls of conventional approaches to scaling CSS. The ECSS methodology and the problems it solves. How to develop consistent and enforceable selector naming conventions with ECSS. How to organise project structure to more easily isolate and decouple visual components. How to handle state changes in the DOM with ARIA or override selectors. How to apply ECSS to web applications and visual modules. Considerations of CSS tooling and processing: Sass/PostCSS and linting. Addressing the notion of CSS selector speed with hard data and browser representative insight In Detail Learn with me, Ben Frain, about how to really THINK about CSS and how to use CSS for any size project! I'll show you how to write CSS that endures continual iteration, multiple authors, and yet always produces predictable results. Enduring CSS, often referred to as ECSS, offers you a robust and proven approach to authoring and maintaining style sheets at scale. Enduring CSS is not a book about writing CSS, as in the stuff inside the curly braces. This is a book showing you how to think about CSS, and be a smarter developer with that thinking! It's about the organisation and architecture of CSS—the parts outside the braces. I will help you think about the aspects of CSS development that become the most difficult part of writing CSS in larger projects. You'll learn about the problems of authoring CSS at scale—including specificity, the cascade and styles intrinsically tied to document structure. I'll introduce you to the ECSS methodology, and show you how to develop consistent and enforceable selector naming conventions. We'll cover how to apply ECSS to your web applications and visual model, and how you can organize your project structure wisely, and handle visual state changes with ARIA, providing greater accessibility considerations. In addition, we'll take a deep look into CSS tooling and process considerations. Finally we will address performance considerations by examining topics such as CSS selector speed with hard data and browser-representative insight. Style and approach Learn with me, Ben Frain, about how to really think about CSS. This is a book to deal with writing CSS for large-scale, rapidly changing web projects and applications. This isn't a book about writing CSS, as in the stuff inside the curly braces - this is a book about the organisation and architecture of CSS; the parts outside the braces!

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