Billy Bacon And The Soldier Slaves Colonial Warrior Series Book 1 Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Tales from a Revolution
Author: James D. Rice
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0195386949
Pages: 280
Year: 2013-08-01
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In the spring of 1676, Nathaniel Bacon, a hotheaded young newcomer to Virginia, led a revolt against the colony's Indian policies. Bacon's Rebellion turned into a civil war within Virginia--and a war of extermination against the colony's Indian allies--that lasted into the following winter, sending shock waves throughout the British colonies and into England itself. James Rice offers a colorfully detailed account of the rebellion, revealing how Piscataways, English planters, slave traders, Susquehannocks, colonial officials, plunderers and intriguers were all pulled into an escalating conflict whose outcome, month by month, remained uncertain. In Rice's rich narrative, the lead characters come to life: the powerful, charismatic Governor Berkeley, the sorrowful Susquehannock warrior Monges, the wiley Indian trader and tobacco planter William Byrd, the regal Pamunkey chieftain Cockacoeske, and the rebel leader himself, Nathaniel Bacon. The dark, slender Bacon, born into a prominent family, soon earned a reputation in America as imperious, ambitious, and arrogant. But the colonial leaders did not foresee how rash and headstrong Nathaniel Bacon could be, nor how adept he would prove to be at both inciting colonists and alienating Indians. As the tense drama unfolds, it becomes apparent that the struggle between Governor Berkeley and the impetuous Bacon is nothing less than a battle over the soul of America. Bacon died in the midst of the uprising and Governor Berkeley shortly afterwards, but the profoundly important issues at the heart of the rebellion took another generation to resolve. The late seventeenth century was a pivotal moment in American history, full of upheavals and far-flung conspiracies. Tales From a Revolution brilliantly captures the swirling rumors and central events of Bacon's Rebellion and its aftermath, weaving them into a dramatic tale that is part of the founding story of America.
Royal Flash
Author: George MacDonald Fraser
Publisher:
ISBN: 0007557361
Pages: 304
Year: 2015-05-01
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George MacDonald Fraser's famous Flashman series appearing for the first time in B-format with an exciting new series style, ready to please his legions of old fans and attract armies of new ones. In this volume of The Flashman Papers, Flashman, the arch-cad and toady, matches his wits, his talents for deceit and malice, and above all his speed in evasion against the most brilliant European statesman and against the most beauiful and unscrupulous adventuress of the era. From London gaming-halls and English hunting-fields to European dungeons and throne-rooms, he is involved in a desperate succession of escapes, disguises, amours and (when he cannot avoid them) hand-to-hand combats. All the while, the destiny of a continent rests on his broad and failing shoulders.
The True Soldier
Author: Paul Fraser Collard
Publisher: Headline
ISBN: 1472239059
Pages: 384
Year: 2017-07-13
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In The True Soldier by Paul Fraser Collard, roguish hero Jack Lark - dubbed 'Sharpe meets the Talented Mr Ripley' - travels to America to reinvent himself as the American Civil War looms... A must-read for fans of Bernard Cornwell and Simon Scarrow. 'Enthralling' - The Times 'This ain't the kind of war you are used to. It's brother against brother, countryman against countryman' April, 1861. Jack Lark arrives in Boston as civil war storms across America. A hardened soldier, Jack has always gone where he was ordered to go - and killed the enemy he was ordered to kill. But when he becomes a sergeant for the Union army, he realises that this conflict between North and South is different. Men are choosing to fight - and die - for a cause they believe in. The people of Boston think it will take just one, great battle. But, with years of experience, Jack knows better. This is the beginning of something that will tear a country apart - and force Jack to see what he is truly fighting for.
White Cargo
Author: Don Jordan, Michael Walsh
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814742963
Pages: 320
Year: 2008-03-08
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White Cargo is the forgotten story of the thousands of Britons who lived and died in bondage in Britain's American colonies. In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, more than 300,000 white people were shipped to America as slaves. Urchins were swept up from London's streets to labor in the tobacco fields, where life expectancy was no more than two years. Brothels were raided to provide "breeders" for Virginia. Hopeful migrants were duped into signing as indentured servants, unaware they would become personal property who could be bought, sold, and even gambled away. Transported convicts were paraded for sale like livestock. Drawing on letters crying for help, diaries, and court and government archives, Don Jordan and Michael Walsh demonstrate that the brutalities usually associated with black slavery alone were perpetrated on whites throughout British rule. The trade ended with American independence, but the British still tried to sell convicts in their former colonies, which prompted one of the most audacious plots in Anglo-American history. This is a saga of exploration and cruelty spanning 170 years that has been submerged under the overwhelming memory of black slavery. White Cargo brings the brutal, uncomfortable story to the surface.
Prison Ship
Author: Paul Dowswell
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 1619630192
Pages: 336
Year: 2012-10-01
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In March 1801, a mere six weeks after Sam Witchall's ship wrecked off the Cornish coast, his hopes for getting home are dashed when he is framed for theft and sent to Australia for punishment. The fifteen-thousand mile, eight-month journey is a hard and horrible one, and when he and his good friend Richard finally arrive, they find themselves fighting for their lives in the Australian bush. This epic sequel to Powder Monkey is every bit as exciting and action packed as its predecessor. "Adventure fans will not be disappointed with the daring rescues, shark attacks, espionage, and heated battles that fill the pages of this historically accurate and vastly entertaining sequel." -School Library Journal
Sapiens
Author: Yuval Noah Harari
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062316109
Pages: 464
Year: 2015-02-10
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New York Times Bestseller A Summer Reading Pick for President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.” One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us? Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book that begins about 70,000 years ago with the appearance of modern cognition. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, Sapiens integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas. Dr. Harari also compels us to look ahead, because over the last few decades humans have begun to bend laws of natural selection that have governed life for the past four billion years. We are acquiring the ability to design not only the world around us, but also ourselves. Where is this leading us, and what do we want to become? Featuring 27 photographs, 6 maps, and 25 illustrations/diagrams, this provocative and insightful work is sure to spark debate and is essential reading for aficionados of Jared Diamond, James Gleick, Matt Ridley, Robert Wright, and Sharon Moalem.
The Killing Man
Author: Mickey Spillane
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101174625
Pages: 320
Year: 1990-11-01
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Mike Hammer walks into his office to find his unconscious secretary on the floor, a brutally butchered corpse occupying his office chair, and a note from a murderer on his desk: “You die for killing me.” So begins a tough-as-nails tale of government assassins and renegade mobsters, told with the breakneck pacing and brutal impact of a freshly fired .45 bullet.
American Contempt for Liberty
Author: Walter E. Williams
Publisher: Hoover Institution Press
ISBN: 0817918752
Pages: 432
Year: 2015-05-01
View: 475
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Throughout history, personal liberty, free markets, and peaceable, voluntary exchanges have been roundly denounced by tyrants and often greeted with suspicion by the general public. Unfortunately, Americans have increasingly accepted the tyrannical ideas of reduced private property rights and reduced rights to profits, and have become enamored with restrictions on personal liberty and control by government. In this latest collection of essays selected from his syndicated newspaper columns, Walter E. Williams takes on a range of controversial issues surrounding race, education, the environment, the Constitution, health care, foreign policy, and more. Skewering the self-righteous and self-important forces throughout society, he makes the case for what he calls the "the moral superiority of personal liberty and its main ingredient—limited government." With his usual straightforward insights and honesty, Williams reveals the loss of liberty in nearly every important aspect of our lives, the massive decline in our values, and the moral tragedy that has befallen Americans today: our belief that it is acceptable for the government to forcibly use one American to serve the purposes of another.
The Education of the Negro Prior to 1861
Author: Carter Godwin Woodson
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 454
Year: 1919
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The Negro
Author: W. E. B. Du Bois
Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.
ISBN: 1616403675
Pages: 154
Year: 2010-01-01
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Read: 190
This is the classic history of the African peoples in Africa and the New World, a repudiation of the absurd belief, widely held in the post-Civil War period, that Africans had no civilization but the one foisted upon them by their slave-trading captors.Writing for a popular audience in 1915, DuBois, one of America's greatest writers, lays out in easy-to-read, nonacademic prose the striking and illustrious story of the complex history and varied cultures of Africa. He explores everything from the art and industry of the peoples of the continent to the dramatic impact the slave trade had both in Africa and on her descendants in the Western Hemisphere.Boldly proud and beautifully written, this essential work will delight readers of American and African history as well as students of great American literature.American writer, civil rights activist, and scholar WILLIAM EDWARD BURGHARDT DU BOIS (1868-1963) was the first black man to receive a PhD from Harvard University. A co-founder of the NAACP, he wrote a number of important books, including Black Folk, Then and Now (1899) and The Negro (1915).
Life in Black and White
Author: Brenda E. Stevenson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199923647
Pages: 496
Year: 1997-11-06
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Life in the old South has always fascinated Americans--whether in the mythical portrayals of the planter elite from fiction such as Gone With the Wind or in historical studies that look inside the slave cabin. Now Brenda E. Stevenson presents a reality far more gripping than popular legend, even as she challenges the conventional wisdom of academic historians. Life in Black and White provides a panoramic portrait of family and community life in and around Loudoun County, Virginia--weaving the fascinating personal stories of planters and slaves, of free blacks and poor-to-middling whites, into a powerful portrait of southern society from the mid-eighteenth century to the Civil War. Loudoun County and its vicinity encapsulated the full sweep of southern life. Here the region's most illustrious families--the Lees, Masons, Carters, Monroes, and Peytons--helped forge southern traditions and attitudes that became characteristic of the entire region while mingling with yeoman farmers of German, Scotch-Irish, and Irish descent, and free black families who lived alongside abolitionist Quakers and thousands of slaves. Stevenson brilliantly recounts their stories as she builds the complex picture of their intertwined lives, revealing how their combined histories guaranteed Loudon's role in important state, regional, and national events and controversies. Both the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution, for example, were hidden at a local plantation during the War of 1812. James Monroe wrote his famous "Doctrine" at his Loudon estate. The area also was the birthplace of celebrated fugitive slave Daniel Dangerfield, the home of John Janney, chairman of the Virginia secession convention, a center for Underground Railroad activities, and the location of John Brown's infamous 1859 raid at Harpers Ferry. In exploring the central role of the family, Brenda Stevenson offers a wealth of insight: we look into the lives of upper class women, who bore the oppressive weight of marriage and motherhood as practiced in the South and the equally burdensome roles of their husbands whose honor was tied to their ability to support and lead regardless of their personal preference; the yeoman farm family's struggle for respectability; and the marginal economic existence of free blacks and its undermining influence on their family life. Most important, Stevenson breaks new ground in her depiction of slave family life. Following the lead of historian Herbert Gutman, most scholars have accepted the idea that, like white, slaves embraced the nuclear family, both as a living reality and an ideal. Stevenson destroys this notion, showing that the harsh realities of slavery, even for those who belonged to such attentive masters as George Washington, allowed little possibility of a nuclear family. Far more important were extended kin networks and female headed households. Meticulously researched, insightful, and moving, Life in Black and White offers our most detailed portrait yet of the reality of southern life. It forever changes our understanding of family and race relations during the reign of the peculiar institution in the American South.
A New World
Author: Arthur Quinn
Publisher: Berkley Publishing Group
ISBN: 0425149560
Pages: 532
Year: 1995
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Tells the early history of North America through the points of view of John Smith, Samuel Champlain, William Bradford, John Winthrop, Peter Stuyvesant, and William Penn
HIstory of European Morals
Author: W. E. H. Lecky
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages:
Year: 1920
View: 439
Read: 189

There is a River
Author: Vincent Harding
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0156890895
Pages: 416
Year: 1981
View: 1121
Read: 346
Presents Black history in America as a force of strong resistance to racism and slavery rather than accommodation and discusses the people and events of this struggle

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