A Most Glorious Ride The Diaries Of Theodore Roosevelt 1877 1886 Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

A Most Glorious Ride
Author: Edward P. Kohn
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 1438455135
Pages: 322
Year: 2014-12-12
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Encompasses key years and important events in Theodore Roosevelt’s early life and career. A Most Glorious Ride presents the complete diaries of Theodore Roosevelt from 1877 to 1886. Covering the formative years of his life, Roosevelt’s entries show the transformation of a sickly and solitary Harvard freshman into a confident and increasingly robust young adult. He writes about his grief over the premature death of his father, his courtship and marriage to his first wife, Alice Hathaway Lee, and later the death of Alice and his mother on the same day. The diaries chronicle his burgeoning political career in New York City and his election to the New York State Assembly. With his descriptions of balls, dinner parties, and nights at the opera, they offer a glimpse into life among the Gilded Age elite in Boston and New York. They also recount Roosevelt’s first birding and hunting trips to the Adirondacks, the Maine woods, and the American West. Ending with Roosevelt’s secret engagement to his second wife, Edith Kermit Carow, A Most Glorious Ride provides an intimate look into the life of the man who would become America’s twenty-sixth president. Brought together for the first time in a single volume, the diaries have been meticulously transcribed, annotated, and introduced by Edward P. Kohn. Twenty-four black-and-white photographs are also included. “Edward P. Kohn has done scholars a great public service by editing the diaries of Theodore Roosevelt, 1877–1886. This volume is essential reading for anybody interested in the rise of the great Rough Rider. Highly recommended.” — Douglas Brinkley, author of The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America “I thought there was nothing new under the sun to be done on Theodore Roosevelt, given the thousands of books already published, but Edward P. Kohn has discovered, and admirably filled, a major gap in books on the life and times of TR. By bringing these diaries together in one place for the first time and providing expert annotation and footnotes, Kohn makes an extremely valuable contribution to understanding Roosevelt.” — Paul Grondahl, author of I Rose Like a Rocket: The Political Education of Theodore Roosevelt “A Most Glorious Ride is an outstanding addition not only to the scholarship on Roosevelt but also to the study of the Gilded Age, capturing the social norms of the times and offering insights into a long-gone era of family life.” — Michael Patrick Cullinane, author of Liberty and American Anti-Imperialism: 1898–1909
The Cowboy President
Author: Michael F. Blake
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1493030728
Pages: 320
Year: 2018-03-01
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The Cowboy President: How the American West Transformed Theodore Roosevelt details how his time spent in the Western Dakota Territory helped him recover from an overwhelming personal loss, but more importantly, how it transformed him into the man etched onto Mount Rushmore, a man who is still rated as one of the top five Presidents in American history. Unlike other Roosevelt biographies, The Cowboy President details how the land, the people and the Western code of honor had an enormous impact on Theodore and how this experience influenced him in his later years.
The Naturalist
Author: Darrin Lunde
Publisher:
ISBN: 0307464318
Pages: 352
Year: 2017-03-30
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No U.S. president is more popularly associated with nature and wildlife than Theodore Roosevelt-prodigious hunter, tireless adventurer, and ardent conservationist. We think of him as a larger-than-life original, yet in The Naturalist, Darrin Lunde has located Roosevelt in the proud tradition of museum naturalism. From his earliest days, Roosevelt actively modeled himself on the men who pioneered a key branch of biology through the collection of animal specimens and by developing a taxonomy of the natural world. The influence they would have on Roosevelt shaped not only his audacious personality but also his career, informing his work as a statesman and ultimately affecting generations of Americans' relationships to this country's wilderness. Drawing on Roosevelt's diaries and expedition journals, and pulling from his own experience as a leading figure in today's museum naturalism, Lunde constructs a thoughtfully researched, singularly insightful history that tracks Roosevelt's maturation from exuberant boyhood hunter to vital champion of serious scientific inquiry.
Theodore Roosevelt in the Field
Author: Michael R. Canfield
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022629837X
Pages: 476
Year: 2015-11-16
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"Draws extensively on the 26th President's field notebooks, diaries and letters to share insight into how Roosevelt's field expeditions shaped his character and political polices, covering his teen ornithology adventures, Badlands travels and safaris in Africa and South America, "--NoveList.
Focus On: 100 Most Popular American Autobiographers
Author: Wikipedia contributors
Publisher: e-artnow sro
ISBN:
Pages:
Year:
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Focus On: 100 Most Popular 20Th-century American Politicians
Author: Wikipedia contributors
Publisher: e-artnow sro
ISBN:
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Year:
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An Unlikely Trust
Author: Gerard Helferich
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1493025783
Pages: 288
Year: 2018-01-01
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At the dawn of the twentieth century, Theodore Roosevelt and J. Pierpont Morgan were the two most powerful men in America, perhaps the world. As the nation’s preeminent financier, Morgan presided over an elemental shift in American business, away from family-owned companies and toward modern corporations of unparalleled size and influence. As president, Theodore Roosevelt expanded the power of that office to an unprecedented degree, seeking to rein in those corporations and to rebalance their interests with those of workers, consumers, and society at large. Overpowering figures and titanic personalities, Roosevelt and Morgan could easily have become sworn enemies. And when they have been considered together (never before at book length), they have generally been portrayed as battling colossi, the great trust builder versus the original trustbuster. But their long association was far more complex than that, and even mutually beneficial. Despite their many differences in temperament and philosophy, Roosevelt and Morgan had much in common—social class, an unstinting Victorian moralism, a drive for power, a need for order, and a genuine (though not purely altruistic) concern for the welfare of the nation. Working this common ground, the premier progressive and the quintessential capitalist were able to accomplish what neither could have achieved alone—including, more than once, averting national disaster. In the process they also changed forever the way that government and business worked together. An Unlikely Trust is the story of the uneasy but fruitful collaboration between Theodore Roosevelt and Pierpont Morgan. It is also the story of how government and business evolved from a relationship of laissez-faire to the active regulation that we know today. And it is an account of how, despite all that has changed in America over the past century, so much remains the same, including the growing divide between rich and poor; the tangled bonds uniting politicians and business leaders; and the pervasive feeling that government is working for the special interests rather than for the people. Not least of all, it is the story of how citizens with vastly disparate outlooks and interests managed to come together for the good of their common country.
Heir to the Empire City
Author: Edward P. Kohn, P Kohn
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465069754
Pages: 272
Year: 2013-12-10
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"Theodore Roosevelt is best remembered as America's prototypical "cowboy" president--an outdoorsy, rough-riding figure who was as versatile with a six-shooter as he was with a pen, and who derived his political wisdom from a life spent in rugged and inhospitable environs: the Dakota Badlands, the battlefields of Cuba, and the African savannah. Roosevelt himself did little to dispel his outdoorsy aura, and for decades historians have bought into this mythology. Yet while such experiences certainly contributed to Roosevelt's progressive politics and abiding love of the natural world, they've played an excessive role in defining his biography. In fact, Roosevelt was a native Manhattanite who came of age in the upper crust of New York society, and the reformist, anti-corruption policies for which he would come to be known were firmly rooted in the realities of life in the 19th-century city. A riveting portrait of a man and a city on the brink of greatness, Heir to the Empire City reveals that Roosevelt was a New Yorker through and through, and that his true education took place not on the ranges of the West but on the mean streets of New York"--
Lion in the White House
Author: Aida Donald
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465010326
Pages: 304
Year: 2008-11-04
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New York State Assemblyman, Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Governor of New York, Vice President and, at forty-two, the youngest President ever—in his own words, Theodore Roosevelt “rose like a rocket.” He was also a cowboy, a soldier, a historian, an intrepid explorer, and an unsurpassed environmentalist. In Lion in the White House, historian Aida Donald masterfully chronicles the life of this first modern president. TR's accomplishments in office were immense. As President, Roosevelt redesigned the office of Chief Executive and the workings of the Republican Party to meet the challenges of the new industrial economy. Believing that the emerging aristocracy of wealth represented a genuine threat to democracy, TR broke trusts to curb the rapacity of big business. He built the Panama Canal and engaged the country in world affairs, putting a temporary end to American isolationism. And he won the Nobel Peace Prize—the only sitting president ever so honored. Throughout his public career, TR fought valiantly to steer the GOP back to its noblest ideals as embodied by Abraham Lincoln. Alas, his hopes for his party were quashed by the GOP's strong rightward turn in the years after he left office. But his vision for America lives on. In lapidary prose, this concise biography recounts the courageous life of one of the greatest leaders our nation has ever known.
Hot Time in the Old Town
Author: Edward P. Kohn
Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com
ISBN: 1459612566
Pages: 380
Year: 2011-03-01
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One of the worst natural disasters in American history, the 1896 New York City heat wave killed almost 1,500 people in ten oppressively hot days. The heat coincided with a pitched presidential contest between William McKinley and upstart Democrat William Jennings Bryan, who arrived in New York at the height of the catastrophe. Showing how Bryan's hopes for the presidency began to flag just as a bright, young police commissioner named Theodore Roosevelt was scrambling to aid the city's poor, Hot Time in the Old Town vividly captures both the birth of the Progressive Era and one of New York's greatest--yet least-remembered--tragedies.
The Master of Game
Author: Edward (of Norwich)
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 392
Year: 1909
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Major Problems in the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era
Author: Leon Fink
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1285433424
Pages: 544
Year: 2014-05-16
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MAJOR PROBLEMS IN THE GILDED AGE AND THE PROGRESSIVE ERA, Third Edition, presents a carefully selected group of readings on the transformative period between 1877 and 1920 that allow students to evaluate primary sources, test the interpretations of distinguished historians, and draw their own conclusions. Covering capitalism, labor movements, the Great War, and roots of Progressive reform movements the book takes a roughly chronological approach, emphasizing themes that continue to resonate today. As part of Cengage Learning's Major Problems in American History Series, the book is designed to encourage critical thinking about history. It contains primary documents and analytical essays as well as introductions, headnotes to provide context, up-to-date bibliographies, and full document sources. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
Why Nations Fail
Author: Daron Acemoglu, James A. Robinson
Publisher: Crown Books
ISBN: 0307719227
Pages: 529
Year: 2013-08
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An award-winning professor of economics at MIT and a Harvard University political scientist and economist evaluate the reasons that some nations are poor while others succeed, outlining provocative perspectives that support theories about the importance of institutions. Reprint.
The Golden Lad: The Haunting Story of Quentin and Theodore Roosevelt
Author: Eric Burns
Publisher: Pegasus Books
ISBN: 1681771004
Pages: 300
Year: 2016-02-15
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Theodore Roosevelt is one of the most fascinating and written-about presidents in American history—yet the most poignant tale about this larger-than-life man has never been told. More than a century has passed since Theodore Roosevelt was in the White House, but he still continues to fascinate. Never has a more exuberant man been our nation's leader. He became a war hero, reformed the NYPD, busted the largest railroad and oil trusts, passed the Pure Food and Drug Act, created national parks and forests, won the Nobel Peace Prize, and built the Panama Canal—to name just a few. Yet it was the cause he championed the hardest—America's entry in to WWI—that would ultimately divide and destroy him. His youngest son, Quentin, his favorite, would die in an air fight. How does looking at Theodore's relationship with his son, and understanding him as a father, tell us something new about this larger-than-life-man? Does it reveal a more human side? A more hypocritical side? Or simply, if tragically, a nature so surprisingly sensitive, despite the bluster, that he would die of a broken heart? Roosevelt's own history of boyhood illnesses made him so aware of was like to be a child in pain, that he could not bear the thought of his own children suffering. The Roosevelts were a family of pillow-fights, pranks, and "scary bear." And it was the baby, Quentin—the frailest—who worried his father the most. Yet in the end, it was he who would display, in his brief life, the most intellect and courage of all.
Historical Essays
Author: James Ford Rhodes
Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand
ISBN: 373267956X
Pages: 244
Year: 2018-05-15
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Reproduction of the original: Historical Essays by James Ford Rhodes

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