A History Of Boston In 50 Artifacts Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

A History of Boston in 50 Artifacts
Author: Joseph M. Bagley
Publisher: University Press of New England
ISBN: 1611689643
Pages: 232
Year: 2016-04-12
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A unique introduction to the history of Boston through archaeological objects
A Short History of Boston
Author: Robert J. Allison
Publisher:
ISBN: 1889833479
Pages: 128
Year: 2004
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"Until 2004 and the publication of ""A Short History of Boston,"" there was no good short history of the city of Boston, not in print anyway. With economy and style, Dr. Robert Allison brings Boston history alive, from the Puritan theocracy of the seventeenth century to the Big Dig of the twenty-first. His book includes a wealth of illustrations, a lengthy chronology of the key events in four centuries of Boston history, and twenty short profiles of exceptional Bostonians, from founder John Winthrop to heavyweight champion John L. Sullivan, from ""heretic"" Anne Hutchinson to Russian-American author Mary Antin. Says the Provincetown Arts, ""A first-rate short history of the city, lavishly illustrated, lovingly written, and instantly the best book of its kind."" "
The Rough Guide to Boston
Author: Sarah Hull
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1405382473
Pages: 280
Year: 2011-03-01
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The Rough Guide to Boston is the ultimate travel guide to this historic city. Seek out Boston's highlights with detailed information on everything from Fenway Park's "Green Monster" to the purple windowpanes of Beacon Hill. Spot the grasshopper weathervane on top of Faneuil Hall. Savour the city's best ice cream and lobster rolls. Walk in the footsteps of revolutionaries. Discover it all with up-to-date descriptions and maps pinpointing Boston's best hotels, eateries, drinking spots and shops. The Rough Guide to Boston also includes two full-colour sections documenting the city's zealous relationship with sports, plus a guide to Yankee cooking and eats. For out-of-city diversions, there is an additional in-depth chapter on the beach region of Cape Cod and the islands. Explore every corner of this engaging city with insider tips and illuminating photographs designed to help make your journey a uniquely memorable one. Make the most of your holiday with The Rough Guide to Boston.
What the Victorians Threw Away
Author: Tom Licence
Publisher: Oxbow Books
ISBN: 178297878X
Pages: 108
Year: 2016-05-31
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The people who lived in England before the First World War now inhabit a realm of yellow photographs. Theirs is a world fast fading from ours, yet they do not appear overly distant. Many of us can remember them as being much like ourselves. Nor is it too late for us to encounter them so intimately that we might catch ourselves worrying that we have invaded their privacy. Digging up their refuse is like peeping through the keyhole. How far off are our grandparents in reality when we can sniff the residues of their perfume, cough medicines, and face cream? If we want to know what they bought in the village store, how they stocked the kitchen cupboard, and how they fed, pampered, and cared for themselves there is no better archive than a rubbish tip within which each object reveals a story. A simple glass bottle can reveal what people were drinking, how a great brand emerged, or whether an inventor triumphed with a new design. An old tin tells us about advertising, household chores, or foreign imports, and even a broken plate can introduce us to the children in the Staffordshire potteries, who painted in the colors of a robin, crudely sketched on a cheap cup and saucer. In this highly readable and delightfully illustrated little book Tom Licence reveals how these everyday minutiae, dug from the ground, contribute to the bigger story of how our great grandparents built a throwaway society from the twin foundations of packaging and mass consumption and illustrates how our own throwaway habits were formed.
A City So Grand
Author: Stephen Puleo
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807050458
Pages: 320
Year: 2010-05-04
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Once upon a time, "Boston Town" was an insulated New England township. But the community was destined for greatness. Between 1850 and 1900, Boston underwent a stunning metamorphosis to emerge as one of the world's great metropolises-one that achieved national and international prominence in politics, medicine, education, science, social activism, literature, commerce, and transportation. Long before the frustrations of our modern era, in which the notion of accomplishing great things often appears overwhelming or even impossible, Boston distinguished itself in the last half of the nineteenth century by proving it could tackle and overcome the most arduous of challenges and obstacles with repeated-and often resounding-success, becoming a city of vision and daring. In A City So Grand, Stephen Puleo chronicles this remarkable period in Boston's history, in his trademark page-turning style. Our journey begins with the ferocity of the abolitionist movement of the 1850s and ends with the glorious opening of America's first subway station, in 1897. In between we witness the thirty-five-year engineering and city-planning feat of the Back Bay project, Boston's explosion in size through immigration and annexation, the devastating Great Fire of 1872 and subsequent rebuilding of downtown, and Alexander Graham Bell's first telephone utterance in 1876 from his lab at Exeter Place. These lively stories and many more paint an extraordinary portrait of a half century of progress, leadership, and influence that turned a New England town into a world-class city, giving us the Boston we know today. From the Hardcover edition.
Slavery in the Age of Reason
Author: Alexandra A. Chan
Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press
ISBN: 1572335653
Pages: 284
Year: 2007
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"Using traditional archaeological techniques and analysis, as well as theoretical perspectives and representational styles of post-processualist schools of thought, Slavery in the Age of Reason is an innovative volume that portrays the Royall family and the people they enslaved "from the inside out." It should put to rest any lingering myth that the peculiar institution was any less harsh or complex when found in the North." From the bookjacket.
The North End
Author: Alex R. Goldfeld
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1614232857
Pages: 192
Year: 2009-06-11
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Before evolving into a thriving "Little Italy," Boston's North End saw a tangled parade of military, religious and cultural change. Home to prominent historical figures such as Paul Revere, this neighborhood also played host to Samuel Adams and the North End Caucus--which masterminded the infamous Boston Tea Party--as well as the city's first African-American church. From the Boston Massacre to Revere's heroic ride, the North End embodies almost four centuries of strife and celebration, international influence and true American spirit. A small but storied stretch of land, the North End remains the oldest neighborhood in one of the country's most historic cities.
Dining Out in Boston
Author: James C. O'Connell
Publisher: University Press of New England
ISBN: 1611689937
Pages: 304
Year: 2016-11-01
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Over the years, Boston has been one of America's leading laboratories of urban culture, including restaurants, and Boston history provides valuable insights into American food ways. James C. O'Connell, in this fascinating look at more than two centuries of culinary trends in Boston restaurants, presents a rich and hitherto unexplored side to the city's past. Dining Out in Boston shows that the city was a pioneer in elaborate hotel dining, oyster houses, French cuisine, student hangouts, ice cream parlors, the twentieth-century revival of traditional New England dishes, and contemporary locavore and trendy foodie culture. In these stories of the most-beloved Boston restaurants of yesterday and today - illustrated with an extensive collection of historic menus, postcards, and photos - O'Connell reveals a unique history sure to whet the intellectual and nostalgic appetite of Bostonians and restaurant-goers the world over.
Loot
Author: Sharon Waxman
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1429960434
Pages: 432
Year: 2010-04-01
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A journey across four continents to the heart of the conflict over who should own the great works of ancient art Why are the Elgin Marbles in London and not on the Acropolis? Why do there seem to be as many mummies in France as there are in Egypt? Why are so many Etruscan masterworks in America? For the past two centuries, the West has been plundering the treasures of the ancient world to fill its great museums, but in recent years, the countries where ancient civilizations originated have begun to push back, taking museums to court, prosecuting curators, and threatening to force the return of these priceless objects. Where do these treasures rightly belong? Sharon Waxman, a former culture reporter for The New York Times and a longtime foreign correspondent, brings us inside this high-stakes conflict, examining the implications for the preservation of the objects themselves and for how we understand our shared cultural heritage. Her journey takes readers from the great cities of Europe and America to Egypt, Turkey, Greece, and Italy, as these countries face down the Louvre, the Metropolitan Museum, the British Museum, and the J. Paul Getty Museum. She also introduces a cast of determined and implacable characters whose battles may strip these museums of some of their most cherished treasures. For readers who are fascinated by antiquity, who love to frequent museums, and who believe in the value of cultural exchange, Loot opens a new window on an enduring conflict.
Enduring Conquests
Author: Matthew Liebmann, Melissa Scott Murphy
Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN: 1934691410
Pages: 325
Year: 2011
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Alternate Histories of the World
Author: Matthew Buchholz
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0698139178
Pages: 192
Year: 2013-10-01
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This remarkable collection of maps, photographs, engravings and paintings from the early ages to modern day provides a stunning new look at the world as defined by our struggles and alliances with the monsters and supernatural creatures that have defined our existence. Learn how a mechanical man helped write America’s Declaration of Independence. Track the course of the Living Dead virus from Africa to Europe and on to the New World. View artifacts from our uneasy alliance with the Martian race, or simply delight in the vibrant colors and illustrations from a bygone age. More than 100 full-color images and insightful essays make this book an essential addition to the libraries of dedicated historians as well as casual fans of monsters and mayhem.
Havana Before Castro
Author: Peter Moruzzi
Publisher: Gibbs Smith
ISBN: 142360993X
Pages: 256
Year: 2008-07-01
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Featuring hundreds of vintage photographs, postcards, brochures, and other materials evocative of time and place, Havana Before Castro: When Cuba Was a Tropical Playground documents how the city of Havana evolved from Prohibition haven and rich man's playground to a heady blend of glittering nightclubs, outrageous cabarets, all-night bars, and backstreet brothels. Here, captured in one amazing book, is the drama, passion, intrigue, and opulence of a legendary city during its heyday-before the Castro dictatorship re-imagined the country and Americans were banned from travel to this tropical paradise. An architectural historian by profession, Peter Moruzzi is an acknowledged expert on midcentury modern architecture and design. He is the founder of the Palm Springs Modern Committee, an internationally recognized historic preservation organization, and the writer/director of Desert Holiday, a documentary film chronicling the history of Palm Springs as seen through vintage postcards. He resides in the Silver Lake district of Los Angeles and in Palm Springs.
Dr. Joseph Warren
Author: Sam Forman
Publisher: Pelican Publishing Company, Inc.
ISBN: 1455614742
Pages: 400
Year: 2011-11-21
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The definitive biography of the Revolutionary War doctor and hero. An American doctor, Bostonian, and patriot, Joseph Warren played a central role in the events leading to the American Revolution. This detailed biography of Warren rescues the figure from obscurity and reveals a remarkable revolutionary who dispatched Paul Revere on his famous ride and was the hero of the battle of Bunker Hill, where he was killed in action. Physician to the history makers of early America, political virtuoso, and military luminary, Warren comes to life in this comprehensive biography meticulously grounded in original scholarship.
The World Without Us
Author: Alan Weisman
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 0312347294
Pages: 324
Year: 2007-07-10
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A study of what would happen to Earth if the human presence was removed examines our legacy for the planet, from the objects that would vanish without human intervention to those that would become long-lasting remnants of humankind.
Lives in Ruins
Author: Marilyn Johnson
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062127225
Pages: 304
Year: 2014-11-11
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The author of The Dead Beat and This Book is Overdue! turns her piercing eye and charming wit to the real-life avatars of Indiana Jones—the archaeologists who sort through the muck and mire of swamps, ancient landfills, volcanic islands, and other dirty places to reclaim history for us all. Pompeii, Machu Picchu, the Valley of the Kings, the Parthenon—the names of these legendary archaeological sites conjure up romance and mystery. The news is full of archaeology: treasures found (British king under parking lot) and treasures lost (looters, bulldozers, natural disaster, and war). Archaeological research tantalizes us with possibilities (are modern humans really part Neandertal?). Where are the archaeologists behind these stories? What kind of work do they actually do, and why does it matter? Marilyn Johnson’s Lives in Ruins is an absorbing and entertaining look at the lives of contemporary archaeologists as they sweat under the sun for clues to the puzzle of our past. Johnson digs and drinks alongside archaeologists, chases them through the Mediterranean, the Caribbean, and even Machu Picchu, and excavates their lives. Her subjects share stories we rarely read in history books, about slaves and Ice Age hunters, ordinary soldiers of the American Revolution, children of the first century, Chinese woman warriors, sunken fleets, mummies. What drives these archaeologists is not the money (meager) or the jobs (scarce) or the working conditions (dangerous), but their passion for the stories that would otherwise be buried and lost.